on creating accessible media - University of Alaska Anchorage

moancapableAI and Robotics

Nov 17, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

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Accessible Media

Using Video and Audio to meet the
needs of a diverse populations

Presented by Kaela Parks

Contents of this Presentation

This resource shares information related to:


Definitions and Benefits


Process Overviews


Producing Transcripts


Creating Timing Codes


Specific Options


YouTube with Subtitle Workshop or
Jubler


Captivate and
Camtasia


Definitions of Key Terms


Transcript


a text rendering of an audio or video file



Subtitle/Caption File



usually a file containing the
transcript text as well as time codes (
eg

sub,
srt
, etc)



Closed
vs

Open Captioning


Closed captions are hidden or
visible depending on user preference while open captions
are always visible



Subtitling

vs

Captioning


Subtitles may contain the spoken
words translated from the original language while
captioning is not only text but also other sounds

Defining Best Practices


Transcripts for Audio


information that is
presented as audio only, such as podcasts, should
have a transcript for those who can’t hear but do
not need timing codes for synchronous display



Subtitles or Captions for Video


whether
captured by video camera or from the screen
they should be synchronized so the text rendition
of audio content is displayed in chunks timed to
match the visual content

Benefits of Accessible Media

Who benefits from Captioning?


People who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing


People who do not have speakers


People in a noisy environments


People who learn better visually


People whose first language is not English


Search engines looking for key words


Process Overviews


Starting with audio or video and creating
transcripts and timing codes as needed



Starting with a presentation that includes
notes then creating audio and captions
automatically



Converting legacy content by requesting a
consultation or technical assistance if possible.


Producing Transcripts


If a transcript is not available and has to be
produced there are choices to make. The process
takes time and effort because there is no
automatic process that can provide reliable
results at this point.



Outsource or use available technical assistance


Do it yourself


Express Scribe provides nice playback control


Voice Recognition allows for “
revoicing


Producing subtitle files


While a transcript is sufficient for an audio
recording such as a podcast, for video, the text
must be synchronized. There are a lot of
programs to choose from that all do basically
the same thing in slightly different ways. Some
good choices include:



Subtitle Workshop


Jubler


C
APTIONING

WITH

Y
OU
T
UBE


YouTube has added a
feature that allows users
to upload either a
transcript or a subtitle
file that has both the text
and time codes.



For best results, upload a
subtitle file. One way to
create the subtitle file is
to use the free subtitle
workshop program.

Subtitle Workshop

The free Subtitle Workshop
program is a great basic tool.


There are a wide range of
keystroke commands and
options to choose from.


Many file types are
supported for both video
import and subtitle
filetypes
, for example
subrip

(.
srt
) which works well for
YouTube.


The program is available
from
http://www.urusoft.net/pro
ducts.php?cat=sw


Jubler

Subtitle Editor

The free
Jubler

program offers a lot
of great options.


There are many
keystroke commands
available and it is
possible to work in
different ways.


The program is
available from
www.jubler.org


Using Captivate to Create
Instructional Movies

from
PowerPoint


All speaker notes will automatically come through as
text that can be:



Spoken out loud by a computer synthesized voice of choice
and/or



Turned into captions with the timing set automatically.




Content authors can make changes in the original
PowerPoint and have those changes updated in the
Captivate movie.


Video tutorials on
http://moodle.uaa.alaska.edu


Using Captivate Manually


Consider using desktop recordings, interactive
simulations, quizzes, and more


Add voice/captions


Captions can be added for individual slides


Captions can be entered by typing, pasting, or
through voice recognition


Sliding bars adjust the timing for each caption


Using Captivate to Create Customized
Instructional Movies


Customizable skins


Presentations as well
as quizzes and more



Automatic or manual
voicing and captioning



Projects can be
exported or published
in a variety of formats
including
swf

or
pdf

Using
Camtasia


Camtasia

is often used for screen casting
(recording the desktop).


In
Camtasia

to caption you
:


Paste in the transcript.


It is broken into three line chunks.


You pick the start times for each.


The font size can be
modifed

and you can select to the
have text presented as overlay or presented
beneath.

Video tutorials embedded on the UAA Accessibility Site


Contact Information

Kaela Parks

Director of Disability Support Services

University of Alaska Anchorage

www.uaa.alaska.edu/dss



Email
aydss@uaa.alaska.edu


Phone 907
-
786
-
4535

Fax 907
-
786
-
4531