PH22003-S Introduction to Philosophy Communications and HumanitiesArkansas Northeastern College First Day Handout

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PH22003
-
S

Introduction to Philosophy

Communications and Humanities

Arkansas Northeastern College

First Day Handout


Instructor:

Gary L. Yarbrough, Ph.D.

Term:

Spring 2012

Office:

C
-
8

Class Meeting Days:

Online

Phone:

(870)
-
762
-
3143

Class Meeting Hours:

Online

E
-
Mail:

gyarbrough@smail.anc.edu

Class Location:

Online

Office Hours:

M: 8:30
-
9:00, 10:45
-
2:15


T: 9:25
-
10:40, 1:30
-
2:30


W: 8:30
-
9:00, 10:45
-
2:45


H: 9:25
-
10:40, 1:30
-
2:
30


F: 8:30


10:30





I.

Welcome!

I hope you will find this class to be both challenging and rewarding! Please feel free to come by and discuss
any issue or concern you might have in reference to the class. I look forward to a great semester!


II.


Course Catalog Description


This is a survey course designed to acquaint students with the ideas of the great philosophers. Students will
be expected to approach each unit of study with an open mind, think about the issues with a critical method of
inqui
ry, and in the end, articulate one's own personal philosophy to some extent.


III.

Course Overview


This course takes one on a journey in search of the unanswerable; however, it is the quest that helps define and
shape the person, and it is a journey th
at covers the lifespan. Philosophy does not attempt to tell one what to
believe, but rather help the individual explore the different possibilities and figure out what makes sense to
oneself. It helps open up a new world of ideas!


IV.

Course
Rationale
Philosophy deals with the basic questions of life that everyone must resolve to some extent
if life is to have purpose and meaning. This philosophy course is designed to introduce the student to the
various philosophies which influenced culture
s throughout the world. It is designed to help the student
explore, analyze, and judge the merits of different beliefs for one self.



V.

Course Objectives

By the end of the course, students will be able to
explain, describe, discuss, recognize, and/or
apply
knowledge and understanding
in reference to the following:

1. the major philosophies that influenced both western and eastern thought

2. the critical thinking approach to fundamental questions about the origin and nature of human life

3. the argum
ents for and against the belief in God(s)

4. the different aspects and issues involved in ethics and morality

5. his or her own personal philosophy


VI.

Course Prerequisites

No formal prerequisites; however, students should have good reading comprehensio
n ability and continued
access to a computer with internet access.


VII.

Course Credits

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will receive 3 credit hours.


VIII.

Required Texts and Materials
Archetypes of Wisdom: An Introduction to Philo
sophy
, 8
th

ed., by Douglas
Soccio ( Wadsworth, 2013)



IX.

Basis for Final Grade

1.

Weekly Quizzes

will be given. The
quizzes

will consist of multiple choice and true/false questions
.

2.

Four

writing assignments will be required over
the lecture and

reading material. Each assignment will be
summary/response in nature and will be approximately two typed pages in length.

Instructions and due
dates
are available in a separate handout
.

The due dates are also noted below in our tentative schedule.
Som
e of these assignments may be completed as group assignments.

3.

In addition, each week you must participate in an online blog discussion
*
. These discussions will produce
a brief “reflection response”. These responses will be a 1/2 to 1 page summary of yo
ur response to one or
more of the discussion questions posed in the lecture.

4.

An end of the semester essay is required reflecting one's personal philosophy.
Instructions will be
distributed in early October.


*The first blog assignment has an “in person” c
omponent. You MUST come by my office, during my
office hours, no later than
October 12
th
, 2012. You must bring a photo ID to this meeting so that I can
verify your identity. In the meeting, we will discuss what you have learned in the class up to that
point.

If
you cannot come during my office hours, you must arrange for another time to meet me BEFORE the
October 12
th

deadline.




Assessment

Points Possible

Percent of Final Grade

Weekly Quizzes

(15, worth 20 points each)

30
0 pts.

30
%

Written
Assignments

(
4
, worth
75

points each)

3
00 pts.

30
%

Online Blog Discussions

(15, worth 20 points each)

Final Essay “My Personal Philosophy”


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XI.

Grade Dissemination

All coursework should be graded within a week of
the assignment’s due date
. Final grades can be accessed
using Campus Connect on myANC. It is the student’s responsibility to keep track of his/her grade after
viewing graded assignments. Write down your exam grades and keep up with them. If you need help
accessing myANC contac
t the ANC Helpdesk by email: ANChelp@smail.anc.edu.



XII.

Course Policies: Grades


Late Work and Make
-
up Policy

All coursework must be completed the week it is due. No late work will be accepted.


Extra Credit Policy
:


No formal bonus assignments will be given. However, the online blog discussions are intended to help your

grade. Points may be earned for the blog discussions simply by participating in the conversation and

posting answers and comments relevant to the
discussion. All students
should

have a perfect score on the

blog discussions; which comprise 30% of your final grade.


Grades of "Incomplete"
:

The current College policy concerning incomplete grades will be followed in this course.
Incomplete grades are

given only in situations where unexpected emergencies prevent a
student from completing the course and the remaining work can be completed the next
semester. Your instructor is the final authority on whether you qualify for an
incomplete. Incomplete work
must be finished by mid
-
term of the subsequent semester
or the “I” will automatically be recorded as an “F” on your transcript.


XIII.

Course Policies: Technology and Media


Email
:

Arkansas Northeastern College has partnered with Google to host email
ad
dresses for ANC students. myANCmail accounts are created for each student enrolled
in the current semester and is the email address your instructor will use to
communicate with you. Access your email account by going to
http://mail.google.com/a/smail.anc.edu

and using your first and last names, separated
by a period for your username. Your default password is your Student ID, no hyphens.
If you cannot access your st
udent email, contact the MITS department at 762
-
1020 ext
1150 or ext 1207 or send an email to
ANChelp@smail.anc.edu
.



You should use e
-
mail to contact your instructor if you have questions over the course
of t
he semester. E
-
mails to your instructor
must

include your full name and the class
and section that you are enrolled in. I respond to e
-
mail within 24 hours, Monday


Friday. Messages sent after 5:00 p.m. on Friday may not receive a reply until Monday
mo
rning.


Internet
: This course has a web component on myANC. As an online class, use of
myANC will be required. You will use myANC to access lectures, discussion
boards/blogs, handouts exams, and quizzes. You should log on several times each
week. You
must view each lecture video and should download each set of lecture PDF
slides. You must participate in a discussion each week and will have a quiz most
weeks.


Computer Labs:

In addition to general
-
purpose classrooms, a number of computer
laboratories
are provided for instructional and student use. These networked
laboratories are state
-
of
-
the
-
art and fully equipped with computers, printers, Internet
connections and the latest software. The labs are open to students enrolled in one or
more credit hours

at the College.


Technology Support:

A lab assistant is generally present in the computer lab in B202
for assistance in using the College computers. These assistants cannot help you with
course assignments; specific questions regarding the technology re
quirements for each
course should be directed to the instructor of the course. Problems with myANC or
College email accounts should be addressed by email to ANCHelp@smail.anc.edu.


XIV.

Course Policies: Student Expectations


Disability Access
: Arkansas
Northeastern College is committed to providing
reasonable accommodations for all persons with disabilities. This First Day Handout is
available in alternate formats upon request. Students with disabilities who need
accommodations in this course must contac
t the instructor at the beginning of the
semester to discuss needed accommodations. No accommodations will be provided
until the student has met with the instructor to request accommodations. Students who
need accommodations must be registered with Johnny
Moore in Statehouse Hall,
762
-
3180.


Attendance Policy

I reserve the right to lower your grade if you fail to view 3 or more lectures.


Traditional attendance will not be taken due to the Internet nature of this course. In the event a student’s last
date

of attendance is required for reporting reason, the date of the last assignment turned in will be reported.
As a courtesy, please let your instructor know if you have decided to drop the course. Unless you notify
your instructor you will continue to rec
eive emails concerning the course.


Professionalism Policy
: For your “in person” assignment, please make every effort to be on time!!!
"Coming and going" is disruptive to the testing process and also will not be tolerated. Per classroom
etiquette; mobile phones, iPods,
etc
.
must be silenced

during all classroom

lectures. Those not heeding this
rule will be asked to leave the classroom/lab immediately so as to not disrupt the learning environment. Do
not bring food to eat during this time.


This course has an online discussion/blog component. Participation is re
quired. It is expected that the
online discussion/blog will result in the exchange of ideas between students, as well as, between students and
the instructor. It is certain that differing views will be expressed. Your instructor does not agree with ever
y
view that is presented in your textbook and you are not expected to agree with these views either. For the
online discussion to be meaningful it is crucial that everyone be respectful of others, so that we can create a
climate in which each individual f
eels free to express her/his opinions.


While I fully believe in the right to “free speech”, the use of profanity is
strongly discouraged
. The use of
racist, sexist, or other derogatory language will not be tolerated and may result in a grade of “0” for t
he blog
component of the course.


Academic Integrity Policy
:

Academic dishonesty in any form will not be tolerated. Students are expected to do
their own work. Plagiarism, using the words of others without express permission or
proper citation, will not b
e tolerated. Any cheating (giving or receiving) or other
dishonest activity will, at a minimum, result in a zero on that test or assignment and may
be referred, at the discretion of the instructor, to the Department Chair and/or Vice
President of Instructi
on for further action. If you are uncertain as to what constitutes
academic dishonesty, please consult the Academic Integrity Policy for further details.
(
http://www.anc.edu/docs/Academ
ic_Integrity_Policy.pdf
)


The instructor also reserves the right to assign the student the grade of “F” for any assignment on which the
student violates ANC’s academic integrity policy or a grade of “F” for the course.



Academic Success Center:

The Academ
ic Success Center (ASC) is a free resource for ANC
students. The ASC provides drop
-
in assistance, computer tutorials and audio/visual aids
to students who need help in academic areas. Learning labs offer individualized
instruction in the areas of mathemati
cs, reading, writing, vocabulary development and
college study methods. Tutorial services are available on an individual basis for those
having difficulty with instructional materials. The ASC also maintains a shelf of free
materials addressing specific
problems, such as procedures for writing essays and term
papers, punctuation reviews, and other useful materials. For more information, visit
the ASC website at http://www.anc.edu/asc/ or stop by room L104 in the Adams/Vines
Library Complex.


Other Stude
nt Support Services
: Many departments are ready to assist you reach
your educational goals. Be sure to check with your advisor; the Academic Success
Center, Room L104; Student Support Services, Room S145; and Student Success, Room
L101 to find the right
type of support for you.


XV.

Important Dates to Remember



Last Day to Add/Drop Classes:


August 23

Withdrawal Deadline:


November 20

Final Exams:


December 6, 10
-
12


XVI.

Unit and Instructional Objectives



Unit I: From the Ancients Through

The Enlightenment


Rationale

: Since “philosophy” is used (and misused) many different ways, the introductory lectures will
clarify the various branches and purposes of philosophy as well as explain its role in everyday life. After
gaining a general unde
rstanding of the discipline, students will explore the major schools of thought within
philosophy through the Enlightenment.


At the conclusion of this unit, the student will have had to opportunity to do the following:

1.

define philosophy

(CH1
)

2.

understand t
he primary areas of philosophy

3.

define an archetype

4.

distinguish between an archetype and a stereotype

5.

define wisdom, belief, and knowledge

6.

understand the qualities of a sage

(CH2
)

7.

become familiar with the lives and philosophies of Lao
-
tzu, Confucius, and Bu
ddah

8.

define Tao, Yin and Yang, and the Golden Mean

9.

Understand Huminism

10.

Define Li, Te, Chun
-
tzu, and Hsiao
-
jen

11.

Know the Four Noble Truths

12.

Know the Eightfold path

13.

Understand the term Bodhisattva

14.

define Nirvana

15.

be familiar with the ideas of Thales, Heraclitus, Paramenides, and Zeno

(CH3)

16.

Understand the philosophy of Atomism and define materialism

17.

know the contributions of Pythagoras

18.

be familiar with the life and philosophy of Protagoras


19.

define pragmatism

20.

distinguish between a sophos and philosopher

21.

understand rational discourse

22.

define a Sophist

23.

understand ethnocentirsm

24.

understand relativism

25.

be familiar with the Ring of Gyges

26.

understand moral realism

27.

know the doctrine of the Superior individual

28.

be familiar
with the life and philosophy of Socrates

(CH4
)

29.

define psyche

30.

understand the “Socratic problem”

31.

define a paradigmatic individual

32.

understand the Socratic Dialectic and Socratic irony

33.

be familiar with the life and philosophy of Plato

(CH5
)

34.

def
ine the “Academy


35.

understand Plato’s distinction between knowledge and opinion and the concept of the Divided Line

36.

know the Platonic forms and define transcendental

37.

understand the Allegory of the Cave

38.

know Plato’s three basic levels of reality

39.

know the cardinal virtues
and the parts of the soul

40.

know Plato’s three parts of the ideal state

41.

understand Plato’s idea of Utopia

42.

be familiar with the life and philosophy of Aristotle

(CH6
)

43.

define naturalism

44.

Know Aristotle’s definition of form and matter

45.

know the four causes

46.

define

entelechy and teleological thinking

47.

define Eudaimonia and Sophrosyne

48.

know Aristotle’s definition of character

49.

understand the Aristotelian mean

50.

Understand Aristotle’s views of virtue and vice

51.

contrast Stocism and hedonism

(CH7
)

52.

be familiar with the life a
nd philosophy of Epictetus

53.

define Cynicism

54.

be familiar with the life and ideas of Aurelius Augustine

(CH8
)

55.

be familiar with the life and philosophy of Thomas Aquinas

56.

distinguish between secular and theological thinking

57.

understand Scholasticism, the law of
Contradiction, the Argument form Motion, the Argument from
Necessity, the Principle of Sufficient Reason, the Principle of Plentitude, the Argument from Gradation,
and the Teleological Argument

58.

understand the problem of evil


Unit II: From The Enlightenmen
t Through the 20
th

Century

Rationale: Modern Philosophy began during the age of the Enlightenment. Students will explore the
major schools of thought within philosophy between the Enlightenment and the modern era.


At the conclusion of this unit, the stu
dent will have had the opportunity to do the following:

1.

understand the effect of the Reformation and Copernican Revolution on thinking in the medieval world.

2.

contrast the secular worldview, God
-
centered worldview, and the modern worldview.

3.

understand the
significance of the Roman Catholic Church and Martin Luther for Reformation

4.

contrast the Geocentric worldview and the Copernican worldview

5.

be familiar with the life and philosophy of Rene Descartes

(CH9
)

6.

understand rationalism, the coherence theory of trut
h, and “methodic doubt”

7.

discriminate between
a priori

and
posteriori

knowledge

8.

understand skepticism and cogito

9.

understand Cartesian dualism

10.

be familiar with ontological and mind
-
body arguments

11.

define skeptic, skepticism, and modern skepticism

(CH
10
)

12.

understand rationalism and empiricism

13.

be familiar with the lives and philosophies of John Locke, George Berkeley, and David Hume

14.

define
Tabula Rasa

15.

understand the process of induction

16.

be familiar with the life and philosophy of Immanuel Kant

(CH 11
)

17.

unders
tand the theory of transcendental idealism

18.

define phenomenal reality and nominal reality

19.

compare theoretical reasoning and practical reasoning

20.

define maxim, inclinations, and moral duty

21.

compare hypothetical and categorical imperatives

22.

understand Kantian J
ustice

23.

define psychological hedonism and ethical hedonism

(CH12
)

24.

understand the principle of utility and utilitarianism

25.

discuss “hedonic calculus” and understand the factors involved

26.

discuss the great happiness principle

27.

discuss the “egotistic hook”

28.

be
familiar with John Stuart Mill’s “refined utilitarianism”

29.

define altruism

30.

be familiar with the life and philosophy of Karl Marx

(CH13
)

31.

understand zeitgeist, absolute idealism, and the dialectical process

32.

define bourgeoisie and proletariat

33.

understand the “d
ialectical process of history”

34.

understand mystification

35.

know the three elements of the material basis of society

36.

know the difference between the superstructure and substructure of society

37.

understand capitalism, surplus value and what it means to be co
-
opte
d

38.

be familiar with the life and philosophy of Soren Kierkegaard

(CH 14
)

39.

define existentialism

40.

contrast inauthenticity and authenticity

41.

know the three “stages on life’s way”

42.

understand the Kiekegaardian leap of faith

43.

define edification

44.

be familiar with the
life and philosophy of William James

(CH15
)

45.

define pragmatism and pragmaticism

46.

understand the “pragmatic theory of meaning” and the “pragmatic method”

47.

understand the “cash value” of an idea

48.

understand determinism and contrast it with the idea of free will

49.

discuss what it means to be “healthy
-
minded”

50.

understand the self
-
fulfilling prophecy

51.

understand the “pragmatic paradox”

52.

be familiar with the life and philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche

(CH16
)

53.

define modernity, pessimism, tragic optimism, Nietzschean perspec
tivism, nihilism, overman, and
underman

54.

discuss Nietzche’s views of God

55.

understand slave morality

56.

understand master morality

57.

be familiar with the lives and philosophies of Ludwig Wittgenstein and Martin Heidegger

(CH17
)

58.

define philosophical deconstruction


59.

understand analytical realism

60.

understand philosophical realism

61.

define phenomenology, constructivism, and ontoloty

62.

discuss the “they”, “idle talk, and “standing
-
reserve”

63.

discuss “philosophical advocacy”

(CH18
)

64.

understand Carol Gilligan’s “different voice”

65.

understand the issue of “representation” in academic philosophy

66.

be familiar with Peter Singer, Martha C. Nassbaum, and Pierre Hadot


Tentative Lecture/Reading Schedule


Week 1 (
August 20
-
August 26
)

First Day Handout

&

Introductions

Overview of Philosophy
(Chapter 1 pp. 2
-
14, 17
-
21)


Week 2 (August 27


September 2)

The Asian Sages (
Chapter 2
pp. 23
-
5
6
)



Week 3 (September 3


September 9)

The Sophist (
Chapter 3
pp.
61
-
65, 76
-
86
)



Week 4 (September 10


September 16)

Th
e Wise Man: Socra
tes (Chapter 4 pp.
90
-
120
)

Writing Assignment Due September 16
th



Week 5 (September 17


September 23)

The Philosopher
-
King: Plato (Chapter 5 pp.
124
-
154
)


Week 6 (September 24


September 30)

September 22
:
The Stoic: Epictetus (Chapter 7 pp.

187
-
215
)


Week 7 (October 1


October 7
)


The Scholar: T
homas Aquinas (Chapter 8 pp.
220
-
243
,

whole chapter covered in lecture
)


Week 8 (October 8


October 14
)

An Overview of Modern Themes (Chapter 8 pp.
247
-
251
) &

Rene Descartes (Chapter 9 pp.
254
-
269, 274
-
279
)


Week 9 (October 15



October 21
)

The Empiricist: John Locke &
The Skeptic: Da
vid Hume (Chapter 10 pp.
282
-
290, 292
-
311
)


Week 10: (October 22
-

October 28
)

The Universalist: Immanuel Kant (Chapter 11 pp.
315
-
327, 331
-
341
)

The Utilitarian: John Stuart Mill (Chapter 12 pp.
345
-
367
)


Week 11 (October 29


November 4
)

The Materialist: Karl Marx (Chapter 13 pp. 370
-
392)



Week 12: (November 5


November 11
)

The Existentialist: Soren Kierkegaard (Chapter 14 pp. 395
-
422)

Writing Assignment Due November 11
th


Week 13 (November 12


November 18
)

The Pragmatist: William James (Chapter 15 pp. 425
-
449)


Week 14 (November 19


November 25
)

THANKSGIVING WEEK

No work is due this week. Use this week
to work on your writing assignments!


Week 15 (November 26


December 2
)

The
Anti
-
Philosopher:

Friedrich Nietzsche (Chapter 16

pp.
453
-
479
)

Writing Assignment Due December 2
nd



Week 16 (December 3


December 5
)

Philosophy a
nd Life: (Chapter 18 pp.
520
-
522, 530
-
551
)

Writing Assignment Due December 5
th



Finals Begin

December 6th


Your

Final Paper

is

Due
December 10
th
, 2012 by 5:00 p.m.







XVII
. Disclaimer:
This First Day Handout was prepared under certain limited assumptions.
Therefore, if the students in the class seem to "fit" the design for the course and if
events occur as
planned, the schedule, assignments, and assessments will be followed.
The instructor has the option, however, to eliminate or add assignments and/or
assessments if he/she feels it is in the best interest of the students.