DIG 4104c Web Design Workshop Fall 2013 3 credits Instructors: Dr. J. Michael Moshell, Mr. Adam Lenz

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Dec 10, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

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DIG 4104c


Web Design Workshop

Fall

201
3



3 credits

Instructor
s
:
Dr.
J. Michael Moshell
,
Mr.
Adam Lenz


Lecture
[
001

:
W

2:30


4:20 PM


|
VAB 111

]

Lab: One of (
Fri. 9:00
-
10:50 AM
-

Moshell
) or (
Fri. 11:00


12:50 AM
-

Lenz
)

OTC 500


Contacting the Ins
tructor

Office Hrs:

See instructor website
, or by appointment

Office:

Moshell:
OTC 500 r
oom 156

Phone

407
-
694
-
6763

email

jm.moshell@cs.ucf.edu



Web:

http://
www.cs.ucf.edu/~jmmoshell/DIG4104c



Course R
equirements

PR: DIG
3134, DIG3716c, DIG3811, DIG3563

Catalog Description

Students will practice designing and implementing professional quality websites.

Course Objective
s

for
Fall
201
3

Students will
learn about the opportunities, challenges and techniques

for developing
websites designed from the grou
nd up for use on mobile devices, in an entrepreneurial
framework.


Educational objectives:


1) Learn how to produce professional
-
quality
websites for mobile devices.

2) learn how to use
a
version control soft
ware

called
git
,
and some accessory programs

3) Exercise and extend your creativity

4) Produce a portfolio piece to show potential employers

5)
Learn how to organize, manage and succeed with a team project

Required

Texts

None.


Recommended

Texts


These br
ief books are
excellent reference material
, and are available for
instant download
as e
-
books

from
www.abookapart.com
, for $9.00 each.


Mobile First. Luke Wroblewski. A Book Apart, Inc.



http://www.abookapart.com/pr
oducts/mobile
-
first


Responsive Web Design. Ethan Marcotte. A Book Apart, Inc.

http://www.abookapart.com/products/responsive
-
web
-
design



T
echnology Policies

Technology

Expectations for Use

E
-
mail:

Students can e
-
mail the instructor with any questions and

expect to
receive a response in a reasonable amount of time (2 business days).

KNIGHTS MAIL: Effective immediately, the University only supports
student e
-
mail communication to and from your @knights.ucf.edu e
-
mail address. The instructor will only respon
d to e
-
mails sent from
@knights.ucf.edu addresses.

Knights Mail:

KNIGHTS MAIL: Effective immediately, the University only supports
student e
-
mail communication to and from your @knights.ucf.edu e
-
mail address. The instructor will only respond to e
-
mails s
ent from
@knights.ucf.edu addresses.



Internet Access:

Students are expected to have access to the Internet at all times
throughout this course. Lectures, assignments and class examples will
be available through the class website, and students are resp
onsible for
checking for updates.

Software:

You are expected to have access to software that can perform the
following functions:

-

Browse the web and view XHTML/CSS

(Firefox latest version; currently Version 14 (August 2012))

-

Debugging (Mac/Win Firebug av
ailable for free)

-

VPN (Mac/Win Cisco VPN client available for free)

-

FTP/SFTP (Mac


Fetch/Fugu/Cyberduck, Win


WinSCP)

-

Telnet/SSH (Mac


Terminal app, Win


PuTTY)

-

IDE or text editor that supports HTML and CSS
(Dreamweaver, Eclipse, TextMate (Mac), EditP
lus(Win),
CodeLobster, Notepad++, etc.)

-

git

the version control system

-

SmartGIT, a free client for
git



You are required to bring pen or pencil and paper to every class. You
must have access to (at least) a desktop computer for homework and
projects.

L
aptop Usage:

You may use laptops
and/or audio recorders
for note
-
taking purposes.

It is considerably to your advantage to bring a laptop to class and be
prepared to demonstrate your work; and to work with your team during
lab. However we cannot require th
at you purchase a laptop.

Backups:

You are required to maintain your own backups. If an assignment goes
missing or gets deleted from the computer you have been working on,
it is your responsibility to re
-
do the assignment and bring it to the
instructor (
accepting full penalties).

I can’t recommend any services,


but I’ve heard that some people have had great success with cloud
-
storage services like dropbox.com and mozy.com

Web Browser Spec
:

All projects
will be graded using the most current default brows
ers on
Verizon HTC Android, and/or on Verizon iPhone.

Server Access:

Students are
required to use the Sulley web server to store their work
and assignments
.

Since Sulley is behind a secure firewall, VPN software
is required for access from off
-
campus. Th
is software is available at
noc.ucf.edu. Not being able to access Sulley will not be a valid excuse
for failing to complete assignments on time.


Additional Policies

Grading and
E
valuation

A: 89.5% and up

B: 79.5%
-

89.49%

C: 59.5%
-

79.49%. (D is a usel
ess grade, so why give it?)

F: less than 59.5%

Grades will be reported using
a spreadsheet on the course website,
keyed to your unique secret number. You will receive
this number on the second
lecture
day of class
(
8/27
/11)

Attendance and
P
articipation

A
ttendance will be taken in each class

and lab,

by passing a signup
sheet at the beginning of class

or lab
. If you miss the signup sheet and
ask to sign in late, you will receive half
-
credit for t
hat day.
Attendance
counts for
5
% of the course grade.

That'
s half a letter grade!

Grade Awareness

It is your responsibility to continually check your grades as they are
posted.
Any questions about grade computation must be raised within
one week of the grade's being posted. After this time the grade is final.

P
ersonal
Responsibility and
Ownership of your
Education

If I assign optional practice problems, and then you ask me questions
about an assignment that requires you to solve similar problems, I will
first ask for proof of the relevant practice problems worke
d out. If you
can’t produce this proof, my response will be “go work through those
practice problems first, and come back and see me again afterwards if
there is still a problem.”

Late,
M
ake
-
up and
E
xtra
C
redit
W
ork

No late
assignments

will be accepted
.

One (1) second after the due
date/time = late. Server
-
time is very unforgiving, so don’t taunt it!


Make
-
up exams will only be given if one of the following conditions
have been met:

1.

A student that misses an exam due to illness must notify the
instructor

prior to exam time
and produce a doctor’s note
stating that the student was unable to return to school for the
exam by the date the doctor says the student will be able to
return (for example, if the doctor says ‘do not return to school
until Thursday’ an
d the test was on Tuesday, the student must
notify the instructor that they will not be present for the exam
due to illness, and then bring an official doctor’s note to the
instructor by Thursday either in person or through mailbox.

2.

A student that misses a
n exam due to a death in the family must
notify the instructor
prior to exam time

and produce a


doctor’s note or funeral notice that falls reasonably near the
date of the exam.

3.

A student that misses an exam due to a court subpoena or
other legal obligation

must notify the instructor
prior to exam
time

and produce a note from a lawyer or judge justifying the
need for missing the exam.

If one or more of the above conditions are met, the instructor will
work with the student to schedule a makeup exam date/time

that is
convenient for both the instructor and student.

Note: job obligations are not valid excuses for missing class, an assignment due date,
an exam, or an exam makeup time.


Academic
I
ntegrity

Plagiarism and
c
heating of any kind on an examination, qui
z, or
assignment will result in an "F" for that assignment (and may,
depending on the severity of the case, lead to an "F" for the entire
course) and may be subject to appropriate referral to the Office of
Student Conduct for further action. See the UCF Go
lden Rule for
further information. I will assume for this course that you will adhere
to the academic creed of this University and will maintain the highest
standards of academic integrity. In other words, don't cheat by giving
answers to others o
r taking
them from anyone else
.


All assignments are expected to be completed individually
, except
where the written description of the document (on the course website)
specifies that this is a team project.

Accommodations for
the
D
ifferently
-
abled
(alternate test
ing
opportunities, support
for signers, etc.)

The University of Central Florida is committed to providing reasonable
accommodations for all persons with disabilities.


This syllabus is
available in alternate formats upon request.


Students with disabilitie
s
who need accommodations in this course must contact the professor at
the beginning of the semester to discuss needed accommodations.


No
accommodations will be provided until the student has met with the
professor to request accommodations.


Students who

need
accommodations must be registered with Student Disability Services,
Student Resource Center Room 132, phone (407) 823
-
2371,
TTY/TDD only phone (407) 823
-
2116, before requesting
accommodations from the professor.





DIG4014c

E
-
mail Protocols


All e
-
m
ails sent to the instructor must follow these guidelines in order to receive a
response from the instructor.


General E
-
mails

From:
Your Knights Mail account!

Subject: [DIG4014c]


Short description of the e
-
mail topic

Body:


Starts with
:
Dr. Moshell (or D
r. Kim),


Ends with
: Your full name


Example:


From: jane@knights
.ucf.edu


Subject: [DIG4014c]


Question about assignment 2


Body:



Dr. Moshell,



I have a question about assignment 2. May I do it in Javascript?




Jane Student

Complaints.

Any c
omplaints about the operation of this course, or any other Digital
Media course, must be handled in the following fashion.

1) Schedule an appointment with the instructor and discuss your complaint.

2) If the result is not satisfactory, write a clear descri
ption of the problem. Deliver it to
the

designated Student Liaison Person
of the School of Visual Arts and Design

(the
SVAD front desk will direct you to him or her.) S/h
e will request a written r
esponse from
the instructor. The liaison person may schedul
e a meeting with you to discuss and resolve
the issue.

3) If this result is not satisfactory, then follow the same procedure with respect to the
appropriate Assistant or Associate
Dean of the College of Arts and Humanities.

GOALS AND PHILOSOPHY OF THE COUR
SE


Mobile media are playing an enormous and growing role around the planet. In many
countries they represent the primary means of accessing the Internet, and are producing
enormous economic benefits to farmers, small businesspersons and citizens of all ki
nds.


We as Digital Media professonals need to know how to produce media for these
platforms. The fundamental divide is between
web based solutions,

and
native
applications

which are programs that actually execute on the mobile device's hardware.


Advantag
es of web solutions:



-

much quicker to deploy than native apps ("generic" across devices, one hopes)

-

dynamically updateable without downloads to devices

-

can contain links to other websites

-

are searchable by search engines, so you get new customers all the ti
me for free

-

no commission paid to the app store


Advantages of native apps:

-

can appear on home screen of the device ("front of mind")

-

access local features like:

o

the user's address book

o

SMS

o

camera

o

autio inputs

o

other built
-
in sensors (accelerometers, compas
ses, etc.)

-

earn money through app store sales


There are circumstances when you need BOTH a mobile website and a mobile app, to
capture maximum market share. Most airlines provide an app to improve the user
experience of making reservations, for instance.


What's a Workshop?


The difference is essentially on two axes:
content vs. experience,

and
canonical vs.
variable.

A content
-
oriented course teaches you lots of facts, whereas an experience
oriented course drives you to practice skills. Most DM courses ar
e mixtures of these two
extremes. A history course, by contrast, is usually fact
-
driven,and the experience you get
involves writing papers rather than making history.


What about 'canonical'? A 'canon' is not a cannon; it is a set of "officially sanctione
d
material" that all practitioners must master. Shakespeare's works are at the heart of
canonical English literature, and html is canonical for all Digital Media majors.


Mobile web design is not yet canonical within DM, but it will be within a couple of
y
ears. We don't yet have a required course about mobile media, because it is likely that
our EXISTING core courses will soon move in this direction. But ... you're the pioneers. I
should say WE are the pioneers.


What will we do in the workshop
?


Lectures.

We start with
some
lectures, as usual, to get some common background.
But
we’re going to try to minimize the time you spend listening to us, and maximize the time
in which your brain is actively involved.


One way of achieving this goal will involve YOUR p
roviding lectures. We call these
Student Talks.


Student Talks.

Every class member is required to select a topic related to the
development of websites or applications for mobile devices; read one or (preferably 2 or


more) articles related to this topic; a
nd to prepare a ten minute talk to be presented to the
class.

I will use a random number table to call upon each student to present your talk.
Therefore you are liable to being called upon at any time, from the first Student Talk day
(16 October) to the en
d of the semester.


If you are absent without excuse on that day and you are called to lecture,

or if you have
no talk prepared when called upon,

then you get zero credit for that assignment ... which
immediately costs you 50 points or half a letter grade
.


Objection: But ... sometimes student lectures are lousy!

Yep, sometimes they
are. But the point is not the l
istening

to someone else’s lecture: it’s the work you
put into
preparation

for the lecture, in case you have to give it. The reason we
require th
e lectures, is to give us a way of verifying (at least on a random basis)
that you
carefully studied and
prepared the material.


There are eleven hours allocated for student talks, and somewhat over 50 students in the
course, so there will be 4 to 6 talks
per hour. Therefore an appropriate length is
approximately ten minutes.


Required structure of ten minute student talks:



1)

Your talk must begin by stating what the audience will learn by hearing the talk.

2)

Your talk must include visual material, either via
Powerpoint, a demonstration
from your laptop, or access to a website. Failure to connect to the Internet in the
classroom is not an acceptable excuse; we all know how UCF's wireless access
works.

3)

Your talk must conclude with one or more "prototypical final

exam questions".
You will discuss (but not include in your presentation) typical acceptable answers
to your exam questions.

4)

Your presentation, in whatever form, must be made available on the Internet (e. g.
on your own personal website, or on Sulley). At
the time you are called upon to
give your talk, you will provide to me, on a piece of 8.5 x 11 paper with 3
-
hole
punch, the title of your talk, your name,

email, cell phone number

and the URL at
which the talk can be accessed. I will add this information t
o the course website
so that all students can access your presentation for study purposes.


Your presentation must appear on that website within 24 hours after you give the talk. I
won't publicize the URLs before your talks, to provide you with a chance to

continue to
improve the site.


Strategy for selection of material.

First



find something that is of personal interest;
talks are always better when the presenter is not going to sleep.
Second


we have a
preference in this course, when possible, for talk
s about
mobile
-
enabled websites

as
opposed to
apps
(which are separately programmed for each device family.) However we
will accept talks about apps, if that's what most interests you.
Third



always remember
that the purpose of this course is to equip you

for a job. Find

and present
useful

information, examples, success (or even better,
failure
) stories.




Somebody got my Topic!

One of the advantages of being chosen early
-
on is that you
will probably be the first one to select that particular topic. If y
ou come to class ready to
talk about X, and someone talks about it ON THAT DAY, and then you are randomly
selected, you may request a one
-
week deferral. (You must show me your presentation to
prove that you aren't just bluffing.)


Can I reserve my topic?
Y
es


if you provide me with the 8.5 x 11 paper describing
your name, email, cellphone and intended topic, and the URL where your presentation
will ultimately appear, I'll post the information onto the course website (without the
URL) so as to "claim" that
particular topic for you. First come first serve.


Topics to avoid.

Don't talk about one of the topics listed on the course schedule; I will be
handling those (git, PhoneGap, etc.)


Version Control.

Everybody has to use
git

and
SmartGIT

this term, and demo
nstrate
their proficiency. It's becoming an industry standard. In order to achieve this goal,
everyone will work in teams of 2 or more people.
However, your self
-
formed teams are
called
corporations

in this course; (see details below.)


Exams.

The midterm
exam is worth 250

points and concerns the topics
lectured about in
the first six

weeks of the cou
rse, as well as what you learn in the labs. The final exam is
worth 250

points and will be drawn from the m
aterial presented in the
professors' or
students' le
ctures
, and what you learned in the final project.


I am very fond of open book exams, which require you to exercise skills that you have
learned. The
two
projects in the first half of the semester are designed to prepare you both
for the
exams and for the

semester project
.


Projects.
The first project is a warm
-
up, and will be executed individually.


The second project is a team building exerci
se, to make sure that your corporation
is
capable of using the required GIT software and can work together harmon
iously.


The third project
is your team's principal work product for the semester
. It's worth 20% of
the course grade, and so it better be good.



Semester Project: Structure, Users, Testing


The professor will assign to each team, a series of "user groups
" of students from other
Digital Media courses that he is teaching. On three occasions during the semester you
will meet (outside of class time) with your user group (preferably, in individually
scheduled time slots), present to them your



Labs

are prima
rily times for you to work with your
fellow developers
. Early in the
semester we will structure this activity. Later, you're largely on your own, to get
maximum benefit from the experience.
Attendance will be taken in the lab and will
contribute 5% to the
course grade (along with attendance in the lectures.)





To receive full credit for lab attendance requires your presence and active engagement
with your team for at least the first hour of each lab period. It is unlikely that you will
receive excellent gra
des on your Team Project if you don't spend the full two hours of
each available lab, working on developing and improving that project.





DIG
4104c

Web Design Workshop

Syllabus Signature Page


I have read and understand the DIG3134 Media Software Design sy
llabus and agree to
abide by the policies and procedures contained within. I also understand that all dates,
assignments, and elements of this syllabus are made at the discretion of the instructor
and can be changed at any time, and if any changes are mad
e that I will be notified in
class and via the course website.


In particular, I understand that the honesty policy for this course is as follows:


Plagiarism and cheating of any kind on an examination, quiz, or assignment will result in an "F"
for that as
signment (and may, depending on the severity of the case, lead to an "F" for the entire
course) and may be subject to appropriate referral to the Office of Student Conduct for further action.
See the UCF Golden Rule for further information. I will assume f
or this course that you will adhere
to the academic creed of this University and will maintain the highest standards of academic
integrity. In other words, don't cheat by giving answers to others or taking them from anyone else.


All assignments are expect
ed to be completed individually, except where the written
description of the document (on the course website) specifies that this is a team project.


I also affirm that I have read the "Complaints" procedure and that I will follow this
procedure if I have
any issues with the conduct of this course.



















Print Name



Signature




Date