Design Project Presentation - Mechanical Engineering Department

measlyincompetentUrban and Civil

Nov 29, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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Introduction

Team #4

MECH 4010




Table of Contents

1.
Introduction

2.
Stirling

Engine
Theory

3.
Modern
Stirling

Engines

4.
Design
Requirements

5.
Design
Selection

6.
Engineering
Design

7.
Final Design

8.
Conclusions

9.
Questions




Monday, December
1, 2008




Slide # 2


Renewed interest in
Stirling

Engines


Theoretical efficiency (approaches
Carnot).


Solar Applications.


Failure in the past


Challenge for
the future


Our goal is to build a working
Stirling

engine that is powered
with a solar heat source.



Stirling

Engine Theory

Team #4

MECH 4010




Table of Contents

1.
Introduction

2.
Stirling

Engine
Theory

3.
Modern
Stirling

Engines

4.
Design
Requirements

5.
Design
Selection

6.
Engineering
Design

7.
Final Design

8.
Conclusions

9.
Questions




Monday, December
1, 2008




Slide # 3


Invented by Robert
Stirling

in 1816


“Closed
-
cycle” heat engine with a
gaseous working fluid.


Temperature differential causes the
working fluid to expand and contract,
generating work in the system.

Modern
Stirling

Engines


Energy Systems, Inc (SES)
-
California, USA


Efficenty

of 31.25% with their
SunCatcher
TM


70,000 units will yield a combined generating
capacity of 1,750 MW of electricity

Team #4

MECH 4010




Table of Contents

1.
Introduction

2.
Stirling

Engine
Theory

3.
Modern
Stirling

Engines

4.
Design
Requirements

5.
Design
Selection

6.
Engineering
Design

7.
Final Design

8.
Conclusions

9.
Questions




Monday, December
1, 2008




Slide # 4

Stirling

Energy Systems, SES. (2008b).
Solar Two
. from http://www.stirlingenergy.com/projects/default.asp

Design Requirements

Team #4

MECH 4010




Table of Contents

1.
Introduction

2.
Stirling

Engine
Theory

3.
Modern
Stirling

Engines

4.
Design
Requirements

5.
Design
Selection

6.
Engineering
Design

7.
Final Design

8.
Conclusions

9.
Questions




Monday, December
1, 2008




Slide # 5


Must be able to operate using a solar heat
source.


Must be able to operate unassisted after
starting for a minimum of 5 min.


Must be suitable for classroom
demonstration.


High temperature regions must be clearly
indicated.


Total engine size and weight to be such that
safe and easy transportation is possible by 1
person.


Must include measurement devices to indicate
operating conditions.



Design Selection


3 Classifications of
Stirling

Engine:


Alpha, Beta, Gamma


Beta/Gamma type: 1 sealed piston, 1
displacer piston.


Pros:

Abundance of available literature and
design variations, low friction.


Cons:

Thermal isolation issues, low power
output, department already possesses a
gamma type.


Team #4

MECH 4010




Table of Contents

1.
Introduction

2.
Stirling

Engine
Theory

3.
Modern
Stirling

Engines

4.
Design
Requirements

5.
Design
Selection

6.
Engineering
Design

7.
Final Design

8.
Conclusions

9.
Questions




Monday, December
1, 2008




Slide # 6

http://www.stirlingshop
.com/index.html

2007 Marburg Internet

Design Selection


Alpha: 2 Cylinders with sealed pistons


Pros:

2 power pistons, greater
theoretical power to volume ratio.


Cons:

Higher compression ratio, higher
temperatures required, increased
friction.


Team #4

MECH 4010




Table of Contents

1.
Introduction

2.
Stirling

Engine
Theory

3.
Modern
Stirling

Engines

4.
Design
Requirements

5.
Design
Selection

6.
Engineering
Design

7.
Final Design

8.
Conclusions

9.
Questions




Monday, December
1, 2008




Slide # 7

http://www.stirlingsho
p.com/index.html

2007 Marburg Internet

Engineering Design


Process 1
-
2 : Isothermal compression


Process 2
-
3 : Isochoric heat addition


Process 3
-
4 : Isothermal expansion


Process 4
-
1 : Isochoric heat rejection


Team #4

MECH 4010




Table of Contents

1.
Introduction

2.
Stirling

Engine
Theory

3.
Modern
Stirling

Engines

4.
Design
Requirements

5.
Design
Selection

6.
Engineering
Design

7.
Final Design

8.
Conclusions

9.
Questions




Monday, December
1, 2008




Slide # 8

Ideal
Stirling

Engine Cycle

Power from the Sun. (2008a).
Power Cycles for Electricity Generation
. From
http://www.powerfromthesun.net/chapter12/Chapter12new.htm#12.3.1%20%20%20%20%20Stirling%20Engines

Engineering Design

Team #4

MECH 4010




Table of Contents

1.
Introduction

2.
Stirling

Engine
Theory

3.
Modern
Stirling

Engines

4.
Design
Requirements

5.
Design
Selection

6.
Engineering
Design

7.
Final Design

8.
Conclusions

9.
Questions




Monday, December
1, 2008




Slide # 9

Real
Stirling

Engine Cycle

Power from the Sun. (2008b).
Power Cycles for Electricity Generation
. From
http://www.powerfromthesun.net/chapter12 /Chapter12new.htm#12.3.1%20%20%20%20%20Stirling%20Engines

Engineering Design

Team #4

MECH 4010




Table of Contents

1.
Introduction

2.
Stirling

Engine
Theory

3.
Modern
Stirling

Engines

4.
Design
Requirements

5.
Design
Selection

6.
Engineering
Design

7.
Final Design

8.
Conclusions

9.
Questions




Monday, December
1, 2008




Slide # 10

Ideal Isothermal Schmidt Analysis

Assuming 200 RPM

Ideal Power Generation



Upper performance limit



Work output = 95 Watts



Efficiency = 52 %

System Friction Demand of Real System



8.11 Watts

Will require an efficiency of at least 5% for the real system




Engineering Design

Team #4

MECH 4010




Table of Contents

1.
Introduction

2.
Stirling

Engine
Theory

3.
Modern
Stirling

Engines

4.
Design
Requirements

5.
Design
Selection

6.
Engineering
Design

7.
Final Design

8.
Conclusions

9.
Questions




Monday, December
1, 2008




Slide # 11

0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
0
0.01
0.02
0.03
0.04
0.05
Heat Transfer (W)

Fin Length (m)

Heat Transfer and Fin Efficiency with Varying Fin Length

Heat Transfer Without Fins
Steel Fins
Brass Fins
Steel Fin Efficiency
Brass Fin Efficiency
Fin Efficiency


Engineering Design


Solar heat source:
Fresnel Lens


Size: 36”H X 27”W


Focal Length: 26”


Max Temp: 950
°
C


Team #4

MECH 4010




Table of Contents

1.
Introduction

2.
Stirling

Engine
Theory

3.
Modern
Stirling

Engines

4.
Design
Requirements

5.
Design
Selection

6.
Engineering
Design

7.
Final Design

8.
Conclusions

9.
Questions




Monday, December
1, 2008




Slide # 12

Green Power Science. (2007).
Spot and Linear Fresnel Lenses.

From http://www.greenpowerscience.com /LINEARSPOT.html


Final Design

Team #4

MECH 4010




Table of Contents

1.
Introduction

2.
Stirling

Engine
Theory

3.
Modern
Stirling

Engines

4.
Design
Requirements

5.
Design
Selection

6.
Engineering
Design

7.
Final Design

8.
Conclusions

9.
Questions




Monday, December
1, 2008




Slide # 13

Final Design

Team #4

MECH 4010




Table of Contents

1.
Introduction

2.
Stirling

Engine
Theory

3.
Modern
Stirling

Engines

4.
Design
Requirements

5.
Design
Selection

6.
Engineering
Design

7.
Final Design

8.
Conclusions

9.
Questions




Monday, December
1, 2008




Slide # 14

Conclusions

Team #2 SCRAM

MECH 4010




Table of Contents

1.
Introduction

2.
Stirling

Engine
Theory

3.
Modern
Stirling

Engines

4.
Design
Requirements

5.
Design
Selection

6.
Engineering
Design

7.
Final Design

8.
Conclusions

9.
Questions




Monday, December
1, 2008




Slide # 15


NX 5.0 solid model complete.


Budget finalized and approved.


Preliminary tests on department
Stirling

engine complete.


Some engine components require
further refinement (crank shaft
mounting, cylinder fabrication).


Acknowledgements

Team #2 SCRAM

MECH 4010




Table of Contents

1.
Introduction

2.
Stirling

Engine
Theory

3.
Modern
Stirling

Engines

4.
Design
Requirements

5.
Design
Selection

6.
Engineering
Design

7.
Final Design

8.
Conclusions

9.
Questions



Monday, December
1, 2008




Slide # 16

Professors:


Dr.
Dominc

Groulx


Dr. Julio
Militzer

Technicians:


Angus
MacPherson

Sponser
:


Shell Canada Limited

Questions?

Team #2 SCRAM

MECH 4010




Table of Contents

1.
Introduction

2.
Stirling

Engine
Theory

3.
Modern
Stirling

Engines

4.
Design
Requirements

5.
Design
Selection

6.
Engineering
Design

7.
Final Design

8.
Conclusions

9.
Questions



Monday, December
1, 2008




Slide # 17

Component Design

Design Selection

Engine Theory

Design Requirements