Cybernetics - Parties I Crashed and Liked

mattednearAI and Robotics

Dec 1, 2013 (3 years and 6 months ago)

53 views

Cybernetics was defined in the mid 20
th

century, by Norbert Wiener as “the
scientific study of control and communication in the animal and the machine.” So
much of the world we live in today is immersed in technological, psychological and
scientific findings. In Harraways manifesto, she describ
es that our society’s
continually advancing technology is causing the gap between man and machine to
close and the line the seemingly separates the two is becoming blurred. The cyborg
is the resulting factor of these advances and is creating knowledge that

continues to
build.


Depending on your choice of rhetorician, one could argue that rhetoric is the
dialectic, epistemic, moral
study of control and communication in people.
We are
introduced to cyborgs via Harraway however we have been exposed to them si
nce
our traditional study of rhetoric started nearly 3 months ago.
While our technology
continues to advance, our original canons of Rhetoric still continue to apply. The five
canons individually could serve as cyborgs of traditional Rhetoric yet the canon
s
also seemingly work together as a hybrid in order to create Rhetoric. Google helps
us INVENT our ideas, Microsoft Word helps us to ARRANGE our ideas, Blogger.com
helps us to design and STYLE our writing, the RAM in the our hard drive allows for
MEMORY st
orage, and an EMAIL allows for the delivery of our writing to others.
Much like how Harraway sees the blurred boundary of man and machine
, we are
able to see the line blurred in reference to traditional Rhetoric and our technology.

In a world where technol
ogy is so prevalent, Harraway invites the idea of the
cyborg in order to challenge our traditional thought process. The knowledge we
acquire through the Internet as well as books allows us to propel forward into a
more advance form of Rhetoric. Harraway wo
uld argue that we should use our
recent advances in technology in combination with our traditional study of Rhetoric
in order to make our arguments more effective and stylistic.