CHAPTER THIRTEEN: PLANETS

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Dec 1, 2013 (3 years and 4 months ago)

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CHAPTER 13

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BOOK TWO


© Charles J. Walther 1997, 2012




CHAPTER THIRTEEN:

PLANETS


One of the first questions that arises when you have an adventure is where does the
adventure take place? Some adventures can take place in deep space or on spaceships,
but most adventures will occur on planets. Immediately, you have the question of
what k
ind of planet it is. In this chapter we present a method of creating planets.
Isn't Playing God Wonderful!

The method is based on random die rolls and basic
scientific principles. The GM should feel free to custom design planets to fit a
given adventure; h
owever, he must remember some basic scientific principles when
designing a planet. A small vacuum world is not
going to have any oceans. Fifty
-
three
meter tall plants are not likely to develop on a planet with a surface gravity of
5 Gs. The GM must think c
losely about what he is doing. If your players don't believe
the setting they are in, they will not believe in the adventure.


As you read through this section you will see a lot of mathematics as part of planet
creation. Before you get bent out of shape b
ecause you are not a math whiz, let me
say two things. First, if you don’t want to use the math, feel free. There is enough
information presented for you to

wing


planet creation on your own. The math gives
you a more solid grounding on how the planet fun
ctions, but is not vital. I put it
in for those of you who want to play with the numbers. Second point, the math here
is not all that difficult. Anyone who graduated from high school and took a course
in chemistry or
physics

should to be able to easily do
the math.


Also included in this chapter is a method to store stellar and planetary data in
an abbreviated form. In this way, the player or GM can find out quickly what kind
of star system he is in. Finally, a list of the more important
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planets is
included.


SECTION ONE: CREATING STAR SYSTEMS AND PLANETS


Part One: The Star

In space, stars are formed when huge clouds of mostly hydrogen gas collapse. Under
the force of gravity, these clouds become denser and hotter. When a mass of hydrogen
has reache
d some 10,000,000 degrees C, nuclear fusion starts and you have a star.
Out of this same cloud, other, smaller objects can condense to form the planets,
asteroids, and comets that will make up a
star system
, i.e. the star or stars plus
all other objects th
at are in orbit around them. We must begin the design of a star
system with the star or stars that are the foci of it. Stars come in seven classes:
O, B, A, F, G, K, M.
The authors remember from astronomy class an old saying to
remember the seven classes o
f stars. Oh Be A Fine Girl, Kiss Me.


O and B class stars are huge, containing many times the mass of our sun. These stars
are very hot and burn themselves out in a short period.
Short by astronomical
standards that is.

Therefore, they don't stay around long enough to form life bearing
planets. When they do burn out, they tend to go out with a large bang as in supernova.
There aren't many O and B class stars.
Rigel is a B Class star


A and F class stars are larger than o
ur sun, but not as massive or as short lived
as their larger brothers. Around these stars, it may be possible to form planets
that have life on them. These planets would form at greater distances than from our
sun. They would be exposed to more UV radiatio
n that may not allow life to form.
There are also few A and F class stars.
Sirius and Vega are A class stars, Canopus
and Polaris are F class stars.

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G and K stars are the types that are most likely to form solar systems similar to
ours. Our own star is a G type and has been burning away for several billion years
and probably will continue to burn away for several more billions,
(we

hope)
.
Our
sun
, Tau
Ceti,

and Capella are G class stars, Arctuus and Aldebaran are K class stars.


M class stars are the babies of the stellar populations. They are also the most common
star type found. They tend to last longer than the other stars since they burn at
a slower

rate.
Barnard's Star is a M Class star
.


Besides star type, more than one star can occur in a star system. Alpha Centauri,
our nearest stellar neighbor, has two companions. With two or more stars close to
each other, planetary formation may be a problem.
The fluctuating gravitational
fields of two or more stars can make the formation of planets difficult or impossible.
Such planets, even if they did form, may have erratic orbits. The first step in our
process of designing a star system is to determine the
number and class of stars
in it. To do so, roll a D100 twice and consult the table below. The Star Code
represents the Star type and the number of stars in the star system.


Table Twenty
-
Six: Stellar Star Chart










Par
t Two: The Planets

A. Type and Number of the Planets

The next step is to determine the types
and numbers of planets the star system has.
For our purposes, O and B class stars just do not have planets. Star systems with
three or more stars also do not have planets. There is a
bout
60
% chance that a star
system will have planets.
This is
an estimate
based on
recent extra
-
solar
a
stronomical study.

At this time we have no idea exactly what percentage of star
form star systems.
Usually there are only two types of planets, solid and gas. Solid
planets are like the Earth, Mercury, Venus and Mars. Pluto als
o would be con
sidered
a solid planet, even th
ough it is mostly made of water ice and methane ice which
exist as gases and liquid water on Earth. Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune are
all gas planets. They are larger than the solid planets and have no out
er surface.
To determine the number of planets in a star system, roll a D10. That is the number
of planets. The game system only allows up to ten planets in a star system. The GM
can add more if he wishes, but rolling up an entire star system is a long, te
dious
job. If the GM wants more than ten planets in a star system, be our guest, God, it's
your time. To determine what kind of planet you have, rol
l a D10 for each planet.
On a 1
-
5
you have a solid planet, on a 6
-
0 you have a gas planet. The Planet Code
First Die Roll

Number of Stars

Second Die Rol
l

Class of Star

01
-
60

1

01

O or B

61
-
93

2

0
2

A

94
-
97

3

03
-
05

F

98
-
99

4

06
-
13

G

00

More than 4

14
-
26

K



27
-
00

M

Example 20: Star Formation

We wish to create a new star system for an adventure. We roll a D
-
100 twice and consult Table Twenty
-
Six. The rolls
are 43 and 65. This means there is one M Class star in this solar system. The Stellar Code for this Star System is M1.
If the rolls were 63,

12 and 76 then that would indicate a binary star system with two stars, a G Class and a M Class
stars. The Stellar Code for this star system would be G1M1.


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f
or the star system is the letter P followed by the number of planets.


B. Location of the Planets

Planets go into certain orbits.
We use to think smaller
rocky planets

would
form
nearer the star, gaseous planets further away. This is because the energy from the
star would boil off the hydrogen and helium ga
ses which make up most of the gas planets
if they were closer.
From recent planetary observations we now know this is false.
We have discovered several hot gas giants orbiting near stars. These are hot
Jupiters.
Still further away
from the star
would be p
l
anets made out of various ices
like in the Kuiper Belt.



Table Twenty
-
Seven: Planetary Orbits


The actual position the planet
will occupy inside the system is
set by Bode's Law.
Named after
Johann
Bode and J. D. Titus
.
Bode's Law expresses the relative
distances of the planets from our
own sun. This law is meant to be
used only within our solar system,
and even here it is not accurate
for all the planets. However,
s
ince we currently
do not have a co
mprehensive model on star system formation,
(our
current instruments cannot detect a solar system like our own)
,

we

will extrapolate
this law for our use. There will be fifteen orbital positions around a star where
the planets can be positioned. The orbits of these planets depend on the size of
the star. Larger stars have planets forming farther away, because of their
greater
size, gravitational fields, and the larger amount of energy they produce. Smaller
stars have less gravity and less energy, so planets can form closer to them. Fo
r
A and F class stars, orbits 5
-
15 are used. Fo
r G and K class stars, orbits 1
-
10 are
u
s
ed. For M class stars, orbits 0
-
9 are used. Planets can go in any of the allowed
orbits. The distances given are measured from the star's center to the mean orbit
of the planet. Gas planets can
any of the orbital positions
. Ice planets can only
occupy the

outer three orbits. Rocks go anywhere.


C. Diameter and Density of the Planets

Our next step in planet formation i
s to compute the planetary radius and density

Radius is being used here instead of diameter for simplicity purposes in the next
section. Remember the diameter is twice the rad
ius. There is no set size a planet
can be.
They will be
variety
of
planetary

sizes and densities. For size, the gas
planets are usually a lot larger than the solid planets. This is because they need
the gravity to hold themselves together. Their densities
can run anywhere from
Code

Distance in Km

Code

Distance in Km

0

45,000,000

8

2,930,000,000

1

60,000,000

9

5,810,000,000

2

104,000,000

10

11,550,000,000

3

150,000,000

11

23,050,000,000

4

240,000,000

12

46,040,000,000

5

419,000,000

13

96,000,000,000

6

778,000,000

14

184,000,000,000

7

1,497,000,000

15

256,000,000,000

Example 21: Number and Type of Planets

We must next determine if the star has planets. A D100 is rolled getting a 38. There are planets in the Star System.
A D10 is next rolled gettin
g a 4. This means there are four planets in this star system. Finally four D10 are rolled to
see why type of planets there are. The rolls are 3, 9, 8, & 5. This means there are two solid planet and two gas
planets in the system. The Planet Code for this st
ar system is P4.


Example 22: Planetary Orbits

The class of star in this star system is M. Therefore orbits 0
-
9 can be used. It is decided by the GM to put the two solid
planets in orbits 2 and 4 and the gas planets in orbits 6 and

8
.


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500
-
1200kg per CM. Solid planets can be much smaller; in fact they can be as small
as asteroids. Rocky planets like Earth and Venu
s have densities of around 5000
-
6000kg
per CM. Planets made mostly of ice
s have densities of around 1200
-
3500 kg per CM.
Roll 2D10 for planetary diameter and density and compare with the table below.


Table Twenty
-
Eight: Sizes and Densities of Planets

Solid
Planets


Code



Code

Die Roll

Radius in Km


Die
Roll

Density in Kg/CM


1

LT 1000

SS

1

1000

DL

2

1000

SS

2

1500

DL

3

2000

SM

3

2000

DL

4

3000

SM

4

3000

DM

5

4000

SM

5

4000

DM

6

5000

SM

6

5000

DM

7

6000

SL

7

6000

DM

8

7000

SL

8

7000

DH

9

8000

SL

9

8000

DH

0

9000

SV

0

9000

DH



Gas
Planets


Code



Code

Die Roll

Radius in Km


Die
Roll

Density
in Kg/CM


1

20,000

G
S

1

250

DL

2

30,000

G
S

2

500

DL

3

40,000

G
M

3

750

DL

4

50,000

G
M

4

1000

DM

5

60,000

G
M

5

1250

DM

6

70,000

G
M

6

1500

DM

7

80,000

G
L

7

2000

DM

8

90,000

G
L

8

2500

DH

9

100,000

G
L

9

3000

DH

0

125,000

G
V

0

4000

DH


You also can
use this table to calculate the size and density of any moons that may
orbit the planets. All planets larger than 1000 kilometers may have a moon. In no
case will the moon be larger than the planet. (Or else the moon would be the planet
and the planet the
moon!)


Example 23: Planet Size and Density.

The GM next determines size and density of the four planets in this star system. He rolls 2D10 four times getting the
following numbers 1
-
6, 7
-
5, 1
-
3, 4
-
7. The first two rolls are for the solid planet and the
second two are for the gas
planets. The results are as follows:


Planet 1:

Radius 750 km



Density 5000 Kg/CM


Code SS
-
DM

Planet 2:

Radius 6000 km



Density 4000 Kg/CM


Code SL
-
DM

Planet 3

Radius 20,000 km


Density 750 Kg/CM


Code SS
-
DL

Planet 4:

Radius
50,000 km


Density 2000 Kg/CM


Code SM
-
DM



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C. Mass, Gravity and Escape Velocity

1. Mass

You next need to calculate all of the planet's masses
(size, not population)
. This
will give you the gravity at the surface of the planet in Earth Gravity Units or
Gs
. From this you calculate the escape velocity in km/sec. The mass of the planet
is calculated by the following equation:


Mass = Density x (4/3 x
π

x (R x 1000)
3

Where:

π
= 3.1416

R = Radius of the planet in kilometers

3

means cube the value inside the ( )


2
. Gravity

The gravity at the surface of the planet is a function of its mass. You compare the
planet's mass with the mass of the Earth to get the surface gravity in Earth units.


Gravity (G) = Mass/(5.98 x 10E24)



NOTE ONE:

There is no direct relation
ship between planetary mass and surface gravity.
Other factors go into the calculation of surface gravity such as size and density.
We are using this relationship for simplicity.

NOTE

TWO
: The number 5.98 E24 is scientific shorthand. In this case it means
the
number 5.98 followed by 24
number to the right of the decimal point

or
5,980,000,000,000,000,000,000,000. Another example

is 5E5 which is 5 followed by
five

0s or 500,000.


If you choose to land on a planet, the amount of Gs your plasma engine can prod
uce
must be greater than the Gs of the planet's gravity; otherwise, you will never take
off again.
(In fact, you may not be able to softly land!)

The Code for the Surface
Gravity is GX.Y where X.Y represents the answer calculated from the gravity equation.


3. Escape Velocity

The Escape Velocity in kilometers per second is a function of gravity and is compared
to the Escape Velocity on Earth.


EV = G x 11.2 km/second





Example 24: Mass, Gravity and Escape Velocity

For Planet 1 above with R=750 km x
1000m/km = 750,000 m

Mass = 5000 kg/CM x 4/3 x π x (750,000 m)
3

Mass = 5000 kg/CM x 1.333 x

π x
=
4.22=b1T=CM
=
䵡ss=㴠8.82b21=䭧==oound敤=瑯=瑨r敥=d散業慬ap污捥s
=
䝲慶楴y=of=瑨攠p污n整e㴠8.82b21=kg⼵.98b24=kg
=
䝲慶楴y=㴠M.MM1=d
=
bs捡p攠噥汯捩cy=㴠䜠堠11.2=km⽳散
=
bs捡p攠噥汯捩cy=㴠M.MM1=x=11.2=km/s散
=
Escape Velocity = 0.02 km/sec

For planets 2
-
4 (calculations not shown)

Planet 2

Mass = 3.61E24 Kg

Gravity = 0.6

Escape Velocity = 6.8 km/sec

Planet 3

Mass = 2.51E25 Kg

Gravity = 4.2

Escape Velocity =47.1 km/sec

Planet

4

Mass = 1.05E27 Kg

Gravity = 175.1

Escape Velocity = 1961 km/sec



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D. Number of Moons

The GM randomly selects the number of moons each planet has. Planets in the inner
orbits have solid moons. Planets in the other orbits may have either solid or ice
moons. Each moon will need to have its size, density and the other specifications
given in t
his section calculated. (To simplify the star system procedure, the GM
may omit moon data). If the moons have some, but limited significance in the
adventure, then the GM may calculate just those properties relevant to the adventure.
The number of moons a
planet has is represented by a code. The Code is Mx where x
is the number of moons each planet has.


E. Planetary Atmosphere for Solid Planets and Large Moons

Only s
olid planets or
solid
moons with gravities of more than 0.4 Gs may have an
atmosphere.
Ice planets or moon would have frozen atmospheres that are part of the
surface.
Atmospheric type is determined randomly from Table
Twenty
-
Nine
. Roll a D100
and consult the table below. Next to the atmospheric type is a percentage of the
active

gas in the a
tmosphere.
Active gas is a gas that will react with people and
objects.
This
exact
percentage is given as a range. The GM chooses a percentage within
that range. The remaining content of the atmosphere is the other gas listed.
Atmospheric class is a code d
esignated to represent the type of atmosphere. By
agreement, the Cooperation uses the following Codes to identity planetary
atmospheres:

A

Oxidizing Atmosphere


B

Reducing Atmosphere


C

Mildly Corrosive Atmosphere

D

Strong Corrosive Atmosphere

E

Exotic At
mosphere


X

Toxic Atmosphere

0

No Atmosphere


G
as planets are considered to have

an atmosphere of hydrogen and helium. Gas planets

do not a solid

surface, just an increasing density.


Table Twenty
-
Nine: Planetary Atmosphere

Die Roll

Class

Type

% Active Gas

01
-
20

0

None

None

21
-
24

A

Oxygen/Nitrogen

O
2
%
=
01
-
10

25
-
28

A

Oxygen/Nitrogen

O
2
%
=
11
-
20

29
-
30

A

Oxygen/Nitrogen

O
2
%
=
21
-
30

31
-
34

B

Methane/Carbon Dioxide

CH
3
%=01
-
10

35
-
38

B

Methane/Carbon Dioxide

CH
3
%=11
-
20

39
-
40

B

Methane/Carbon Dioxide

CH
3
%=21
-
30

41
-
45

C

Ammonia/Nitrogen

NH
4
%=01
-
10

46
-
49

C

Ammonia/Nitrogen

NH
4
%=11
-
20

50
-
51

C

Ammonia/Nitrogen

NH
4
%=21
-
35

52
-
53

D

Water/Sulfuric Acid

H
2
O%=01
-
40

54
-
55

D

Water/Sulfuric Acid

H
2
O%=41
-
80

56
-
57

D

Water/Hydrochloric Acid

H
2
O%=01
-
40

58
-
59

D

Water/Hydrochloric Acid

H
2
O%=41
-
80

60
-
61

D

Water/Nitric Acid

H
2
O%=01
-
40

62
-
63

D

Water/Nitric Acid

H
2
O%=41
-
80

64
-
65

D

Water/Sodium Hydroxide

H
2
O%=01
-
40

66
-
67

D

Water/Sodium Hydroxide

H
2
O%=41
-
80

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68
-
69

D

Water Potassium/Hydroxide

H
2
O%=01
-
40

70
-
71

D

Water Potassium/Hydroxide

H
2
O%=41
-
80

72
-
73

X

Cyanide/Nitrogen

CN%=05
-
25

74
-
75

C

Ammonia/Water

NH
4
%=01
-
25

76
-
77

C

Ammonia/Water

NH
4
%=26
-
50

78
-
79

C

Ammonia/Methane

NH
4
%=01
-
25

80
-
81

C

Ammonia/Methane

NH
4
%=26
-
50

82
-
83

B

Methane/Hydrogen

CH
3
%=01
-
20

84
-
85

B

Methane/Hydrogen

CH
3
%=21
-
40

86
-
87

B

Methane/Hydrogen

CH
3
%=41
-
60

88
-
89

A

Chlorine/Nitrogen

Cl%=01
-
20

90
-
91

A

Chlorine/Hydrogen

Cl%=21
-
40

92
-
95

E

Exotic

GM Choice

96
-
00

0

None

None



F. The Amount of Free Water on the Planetary Surface

For solid planets with an atmosphere and for ice planets, there is a possibility
of surface water existing. The water can be liquid or ice depending on how

far the
planet is from the star. The procedure for finding the amount of water is: Roll a
D100 and then add or subtract the appropriate modifiers from the following list.
The modified result is the percentage of the planet's surface covered by water. Any
negative number means there is no surface water; numbers greater than 100 mean there
is no dry land. The Code representing the amount of surface water is Wxx where xx
is the percentage of the surface covered by water.


Modifiers:

Size

Code



Densit
y Code




Atmosphere Code

SS


-
20%



DL


-
20%



E & X


-
50%

SM



00%



DM



00%



B


-
40%

SL


+10%



DH


+10%



C & D


-
10%

SV


+20%








A



00%


Example 25: Atmospheres

Planetary formation continues. The GM
looks at planet 1. It is too small and the gravity is too weak to hold and
atmosphere. Planets 3 and 4 are gas giants and have no conventional atmosphere or solid surface. The only planet in
this star system is Planet 2. The GM rolls a D100 getting a 47. L
ooking at Table Twenty
-
Nine this means the planet
has a nitrogen
-
ammonia atmosphere where the ammonia content of the atmosphere is between 11%
-
20%. The
remaining gas is inert nitrogen. The GM decides that the atmosphere will be 15% ammonia and 85% nitrogen
.
(
Don’t go walking around in your shorts.)


Example 26: Surface Water

The GM rolls to determine what surface water exists on Planet 2. Planet 3 and 4 are gas

giants and will not have
surface water because they have no solid surface. Planet 1 has no atmosphere so would also not have any surface
water since it would evaporate away. The modifiers are as follows:

Large Size Planet


+10%

Medium Density





00%

C
Class Atmosphere


-
10%

Total modifier is zero


A D100 Die roll is made and 47% is made. With no modifier the surface water percent is 47%. The code is this
case is W47
. (In this case the water is most likely ammonia hydroxide so leave the

swimming trunks
at home.)



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G. Mineral and Agricultural Potential

Potentials represent how suitable a planet is for development. Planets with high
potentials have a high probability for exploitation. Mineral Potential is a measure
of the amount of natural resources that are available on that planet. Mineral
potential cov
er raw materials such as ores, oil, crystals and the like. Agricultural
Potential represents how well crops and plant and animal life might thrive. Only
solid planets and moons have Mineral and Agricultural Potentials. Any planet where
the Mineral Potentia
l is greater than 40 has enough quantities of ores or crystals
to be mined. To determine the Mineral Potential for a planet, roll a D100. The die
roll is the Mineral Potential.
There are no modifiers.
To determine if a particular
metal or crystal is availa
ble on the planet, roll a D100. If the die roll is under
the planet's Mineral Potential, then the planet has enough of that item somewhere
that can be mined. The GM can only make as many die rolls as the mineral potential.
For a planet with a Mineral Poten
tial of 53, there can only be 53 die rolls made.
In order for oil and gas to form, the planet must an Agricultural Potential of over
50%.


To have an Agricultural Potential, a planet must have at least 10% surface water.
To determine the Agricultural Poten
tial, roll a D100,

adding or subtracting the
following modifiers below:


Modifiers:

Size Code



% Surface Water



Atmosphere Code

SS


-
10%


%Water GT 60%

+
20%


E & X


-
7
0%

SM



00%


%Water BT 40
-
59%

+10%


D


-
5
0%

SL


+10%


%Water BT 21
-
39%

-
10%


C


-
3
0%

S
V


+20%


%Water LT 20%

-
20%


B


+1
0%










A


+20%


Should the planet have an Agricultural Potential over 20%, it can support native
plant and animal life forms compatible with the atmosphere.


The Codes representing Mineral and Agricultural Potential a
re placed inside of
brackets along with the Industrial, Electronic and Artistic Potentials
(which will
be gotten to later)
. The potentials are listed in the following order:

[Mineral, Agricultural, Industrial, Electronic, Artistic]



G. Population

Population is a judgment call that I
have to
leave that with the GM. The following
is a guideline

only
.

There are four major classes of planets”

Major
Planets




500,000,000
-
10,000,000,000

Minor Pla
nets




10,000
,000
-
500,000,000

Example 27: Mineral
and Agricultural Potentials

The GM next turns to determining the Mineral and Agricultural Potentials for both solid planets. He rolls a D100
twice getting a 57 for Planet 1 and 86 for Planet 2.


He next determines the Agricultural Potential for Planet 2. P
lanet 1 has no atmosphere and no surface water so there
can be no Agricultural Potential. For Planet 2 he uses the following modifiers:

Large Planet




+10%

% Surface Water BT 21
-
39%


-
10%

Class C Atmosphere



-
30%

Total Modifier




-
30%

The GM rolls a 67
on a D100. Applying the modifier this becomes a 37
.
Y
ou can forget the seed corn.


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Col
onies





100,000
-
10,000,000

Claimed Planet
s, Outposts


100
-
100,000


Most major planets have suitable atmospheres for the intelligent life inhabiting
it and a high Mineral an
d/or Agricultural Potentials.
Lifeless rocks do not a good
home make.

There is always a good reason why major planets are major planets. The
reason is that there is something there that lots of creatures want. It can be food,
resources, central location or

something else. The GM should not make major planets
out of planets that don't have anything going for them, such as poor natural resources
or the ability to raise food on them. Minor planets also have similar things going
for them. They can be major plan
ets in the making, but they also can have one or
two bad things that might keep many away while nevertheless having something that
up to several hundred million people can make a good living from. Colonies are future
major and minor planets that have not y
et grown to their full potential. The six
races encourage people to move to colonies and raise families. (i.e. they don't have
huge populations). This means conditions, while primitive, are not hostile. Claimed
planets can be anything,
and they usually are
. People go there not to live, but to
work for a year or two and then leave. Outposts are the armpits of space, but there
is enough money to be made so that somebody will put up with the site for a while,
but the family will opt to stay home.


The Populati
on Code is represented by a PxxEx. The first two x's are the number and
the Ex is the exponent of the population. A million people will be represented as
P1.0E6. The code for one hundred thirty million people is represented as P1.3E8.


I. Electronic, Industrial and Artistic Potential

Each of these three potentials requires a population to produce them. Now that the
GM knows the populati
ons of his planets, he can now determine the Industrial,
Electronic and Artistic potentials. These potentials are a function of how well the
planet can produce manufactured, electronic and artistic goods for export. Planets
with high Industrial and Electro
nic Potentials usually have a source of raw material
on the planet or nearby. They are normally major or minor planets, but can be
colonies. High Artistic potentials are found on planets with large populations. They
can also be found on planets with large
amounts of the raw materials required for
these arts. This latter case is not common, since artists like to be comfortable,
like the rest of us mere mortals. These three potentials will serve as a guideline
to determine the availability of certain goods. I
n general, to determine if a special
or unusual item is available, it is necessary to roll under the planet's
Manufacturing, Electronic or Artistic Potential. To determine what these potentials
are, roll a D100 for each and use the following modifiers.


Fo
r Industrial and Electronic Potentials:

Mineral Potential
GT
60



+25%

Example 27: Popul
ation

The GM looks at both planets to try and estimate what kind of population they would have. Planet 1 doesn’t have
much going for it. No gravity, no atmosphere, no water and not much in the way of minerals. Anyone there would
be faced with a hostile env
ironment. Not exactly someplace to send friends or family (
well family anyway
). This
looks like the perfect place for an outpost, maybe a mining colony. There certainly not be any more that 1000
people hanging around. The Population Code would be 1E3. Plan
et 2 does a few more things going for it. Yes it has
a hostile atmosphere, but it has water you could treat and a high mineral potential. You might be able to grow some
food in protected atmospheres underground. This place be the perfect for a mining colon
y. The GM decides to give
it a population of about 500,000 people. This is a Population Code of 1E5.


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Mineral Potential BT 40
-
59


+10%

Mineral Potential
LT
30



-
15%

Major Planet





+20%

Minor Planet





+10%

Colony






-
10%

Claimed Planet or Outpost


-
40%

Agricultural Potential GT 60


+10%

Agricultural Potential LT
40


-
20%


For Artistic Potential:

Mi
neral Potential GT 60



+10%

Minor Planet





-
20%

Colony






-
40%

Claim
ed Planet or Outpost


-
60%

Planet
is populated with Flots


-
30%

Pl
anet is populated by the Crys

-
70%


This completes the determination of the characteristics of the star system. Record
the information on the Planet Information Sheet.
(See Appendix Three)
. The GM then
fills in the rest of the information as he or she wants to.





Example 28: Industrial, Ele
ctronic and Artistic Potentials

The GM now considers what the Industrial, Electronic and Artistic potentials of the two solid planets are. For
Industrial and Electrical potentials the modifiers are as follows:







Planet 1



Planet 2

Mineral Potential



+25%



+10%

Agricultural Potential



-
20%




00%

Colony






00%




10%

Claimed Planet




-
40%




00%

Total Modifier




-
35%




00%


For Artistic Potential the modifiers are as follows:

Mineral Potential






00%



+10%

Colony






00%



-
40%

Claimed

Planet





-
60%




00%

Total Modifier




-
60%




-
30%



The first three die rolls is made for Planet 1. Are made getting 38, 76, 54

For Industrial Potential

38%
-
35% = 5%

For Electronic Potential

76%
-
35% =41%

For Artistic Potential

54%
-
60% =
-
6% = zero


The second three die rolls for Planet 2 are as follows: 83, 45 and 76

For Industrial Potential

83%
-
00% = 83%

For Electronic Potential

45%
-
00% =45%

For Artistic Potential

76%
-
30% =46%


The Potential Codes for Planet 1 are [57, 0, 5, 41, 0]

The Potentia
l Codes for Planet 2 are [86, 37, 83, 45, 46]


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SECTION TWO: RECORDING THE INFORMATION


Now that you have this huge mass of information on a star system, how can you record
it in a short and easy way to remember format? This is done by using the various
codes to represent the above information in a shorthand form. The following template
is us
ed to represent the information calculated in Section One. There is a blank
Planetary Data Sheet in
Appendix Three
. You may photocopy the data sheet for personal

use.



Table Thirty: Planetary Data Template

1. Star Code; 2. Number of Planets; 3 Star name

4
. Orbit No; 5. Size and Density Codes; 6. Diameter(2xRadius): 7. Gravity Code; 8.
Escape Velocity; 9. Number of Moons; 10. Atmosphere Code; 11. Surface Water Percent;
12. Population Code; 13. [Mineral, Agricultural, Industrial, Electronic Artistic
Potentia
ls]; 14. Name


Using the above numbers the data is arranged as follows:

1.; 2.; 3.

4.; 5.; 6.; 7.; 8.; 9.; 10.

11.; 12.; 13.; [ x,x,x,x,x]; 14.

Moons can be listed on the back side of the Pla
netary Data Sheet. Moons are listed
with the Orbit code of the pl
anet they orbit followed by a "
-
" and then the number
of the moon. The data representing the moons are in the same order as for the planet
with the exception that the M code for the number of

moons is omitted.


SECTION THREE: MAJOR PLANETS OF THE COOPERATION


Inside the Cooperation, there are a few planets of particular importance. The six
capital planets and a few of the major planets make up these critical planets. The
following is a listing

of these planets. Data is included only for the star type
and the number of planets present; however, only the main planet's data is given.
Example 29: Recording the Data

The planetary Information sheet in Appendix One would look like this for the

star system information:

M1 P4 Darware

O2, SS
-
DM, 1500 km, G0.001, 0.01 km/sec, M0, A0

W0, P1E3, [57,0,41,0] Garta

O4, SL
-
DM, 12,000 km, 6.8 km/sec, M1, AC

W47, P1E5, [86, 37, 83, 45, 46] Shel

O6, GS
-
DL, 40,000 km, g4.2, 47.1 km/sec, M3 A0

W0, P0, [0, 0,
0, 0], Tharat

06, GM
-
DM, 100,000 km, G 175.1, 1961 km/sec, M4, A0

W0, P0, [0, 0, 0, 0] Walker


Moon Data Not Calculated in Text

04
-
1, SS
-
DL, 1200 km, G0.002, 0.003 km/sec, A0

W0 P0 [31, 0, 0, 0, 0] Froth

06
-
1, SS
-
DM, 3000 km, G0.1, 1.1 km/sec, A0

W0,
P1E1, [57, 0, 0, 0] Sleepy

06
-
2&3, SS
-
DL, 1000 km G0.001, 0.007 km/sec, A0

W0, P0 [25, 0, 0, 0] Baxter & Bremen

08
-
1,2,3,4, SS
-
DL, 2000 km, G0.05, 0.6 km/sec, A0

W0, P0, [0, 0, 0, 0] Death, Doom, Gloom, Zero


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This list is not inclusive, the GM is free to make up any additional planets he wants.
The numbers next to the plan
et template correspond to the numbers on the starmap.


Part One: Human

1.G1 P11 Sol

03 SL
-
DH 12,765km G1.0 11.2km/sec M1 A
A

W73 P5.4E9 [89,90,100,100,91] Terra or
Earth

T
he home planet of humanity and the
headquarters of the Human

League. On
Earth are the home offices of many major
corporations such as Universe, Inc. The
surface is dotted by huge
mega
-
structures which house the natives
of the planet. Outside the city
complexes, is a pure, virgin wilderness.
A move to restore the pl
anet to its
natural state is nearly complete.
Business and manufacturing centers are
all underground to save energy.



2. G0 P5 Ceti

02 SM
-
DM 7986km G0.78 8.76km/sec M1 A
A


W53 P6.4E8 [74,81,100,100,76] Ceti

The manufacturing center of the Human League.
Headquarters of COMGEN and AGRIGEN.
Home of the University of Ceti and the first planet to adopt the Four Fold Principles
of Government. Terraformed to resemble Earth as closely as possible. Large tracks
have been set aside as home for the planet's native
life forms. A nearby asteroid
belt has a Mineral Potential of 87% and is the main source of raw materials for the
planet.


3. M1 P3 Anarren

04 SL
-
DH 15,000km G1.6 17.9km/sec M2 A
A


W31 P4.8E7 [75,61,88,100,99] Aanhorn

The central hub of the Human League'
s efforts to explore
unknown
space. The location
of the largest naval base in the Human League and headquarters of the Human League
Navy. The space dock orbiting the planet is the largest structure ever built in free
orbit with a volume of 13,500,000 CM. O
ne of the first planets to recover from the
Interstellar War.


4.G2 P5 Leisure

O3 SM
-
DM 10,534km G0.60 6.6km/sec M0 A
A


W65 P1.9E8 [31,100,45,53,100] New Athens

The cultural hub of the Human League. Founded by a group of artists seeking relief
from the d
evastation of the Interstellar War. Home of the Aristotle University of
Fine Arts. Many of the best painters, playwrights, actors, philosophers and
composers live here among beautiful surroundings. The planet is deliberately
maintained in its original, pri
stine condition. Many beautiful mountain ranges and
fertile valleys provide inspiration to the artistic community. Considered by many
to be the most beautiful planet in known space.


5. G1M1 P4 Zarren

O
3 SM
-
DH 7530km G0.5 5.7km/sec M0 A
A


Map of Known Space

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W43 P3.7E7 [78,9
1,93,79,65] Zarren

The up and coming planet of the League. Located near the boundary of the Human League
and the edge of the Commons. The main base for human colonization activities in this
area. The site of the third largest Human League naval base. A tra
ding and commercial
center where goods from the other races are bought and sold. One of the richest
planets in the Cooperation.


Part Two: Mantu

1. M1 P8 Lytanowasha

O2 SM
-
DM 11,048km G0.7 8.2km/sec M1 A
A


W52 P6.5E9 [85,92,100,100,100] Mantus

Core world
and the central planet of the Mantu Collective. The center of Mantu
organizations of government, industry, science and military. An endless stream of
activity can be seen from space and on the ground. Human visitors to the planet are
reminded of a huge bee
hive. Most of the forest areas have long been cleared for
ind
ustrial development. Home of Do
-
tac
-
antac, the largest Mantu
C
orporation.


2. K1 P7 Guwanowasha

O3 SM
-
DH 11,635km G1.0 11.7km/sec M2 A
A


W31 P4.3E9 [91,46,100,100,75] Keeteedawa

The raw
materials planet. A large ball of light and heavy metal ores. The mining
heart of the Mantu Collective. Metals are shipped from here throughout the Mantu
Collective. Known as Shade by some visitors because of the pale gray fog of metallic
smoke. This seemi
ngly toxic cloud has no effect on the Mantu.


3. K1 P5 Cistaceae

O4 SL
-
DH 14,555km G1.3 14.6km/sec M1 AA


W0 P2.7E8 [79,0,100,100,58] Kadoski

O4
-
1 SL
-
DL 9754km G0.5 5.6 km/sec M0 A
A

W76 P1.7E8 [54,96,87,65,89] Madassi

These twin planets orbit each other.
Kadoski is the home of Kadoski Industries. The
planet is almost all one huge factory that exclusively produces starship drives.
It is also the main naval base for the Mantu Navy. Madassi is the bread basket of
the Mantu Collective and can produce almost ha
lf the food requirement for the entire
race. The final battle of the first Yadeze Invasion was fought in this star system.
The Mantu navy finally beat back the Yadeze battle fleet. Loss of these two planets
would have made rebuilding impossible for the Man
tu.


4. M2 P3 Mantaowasha

O3 SL
-
DM 9875km G0.6 6.7km/sec M0 A
A


W68 9.5E7 [75,68,96,88,34] Kensein

This is the closest planet the Mantu have to the Outside. It was occupied during
the first Yadeze Invasion. Of the over two hundred million Mantu on the plan
et, 93%
were killed by the Yadeze. The rest survived as slaves until the Yadeze were beaten
back. The Yadeze tried unsuccessfully to destroy the planet when they left, but a
quick commando attack prevented the destruction. It is now the headquarters for th
e
Cooperation's First Fleet and the location most experts believe will be the target
of the first attack by the next Yadeze invasion. This is why Mantaowashaa is the
most heavily guarded planet in known space.


5. G1 P5 Kandasobia

O3 SM
-
DM 4500km G.0.5 6.2
5km
\
sec M0
A
0

W0 3.3E7 [100,0,98,89,32]

This is the new and upcoming planet in the Mantu Collective. Discovered and surveyed
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only two hundred years ago, this planet is rich in raw materials. The planet is also
small and easy to mine. Many Mantu companies
are here. It is estimated the resources
from this planet alone could keep the Cooperation going for five hundred years.


C. Part Three: D'Thal

1. G1 P5 Light

O2 SL
-
DH 13,671km G1.3 15.3km/sec M1 A
A


W58 P6.2E9 [88,94,100,100,100] D'Thal

New home world to
the D'Thal and the center of the D'Thal Gathering. At the capital
of Amar sits the Council of Amar. A rugged planet built mostly underground. Filled
with natural beauty and splendor. Monuments to Amar and his family were built in
pure silver. Also here are

the headquarters of Amart, the largest clearing house
in the Cooperation.


2. F1 P12 Delt

O5 SL
-
DH 12890km G1.3 15.2km/sec M3
A
A

W49 P1.36E9 [64,75,86,93,54] Amain

Called the doctor world.

Here is the largest, best equipped and foremost medical
research center in the Cooperation. Doctors from all the races live in artificially
produced environments. Research that will benefit all the races is performed daily.
High speed emergency ships are
kept ready to respond to any call for medical help.
This is the headquarters for Nelt.


3. G2M1 P3 Neal

O8 GL
-
DM 153,000km G392 4586.4km/sec M12
A
0

W0 P0 [0,0,0,0,0] Neal

The favorite tourist vacation spot in the Cooperation for oxygen breathing races.
A
bundant regrown forests, placid mountains, and many hidden lakes fill the planet.
A place for getting away from reality. All manners of entertainments are provided
by a staff trained to indulge almost every whim. All sports can be played in perfect
weather
. The temperature is a pleasant 2
0
C year
-
round on most areas. A major mental
recovery hospital is here to nurse patients back to health. This planet is also the
location of the D'Thal School of Mental Powers where their advanced telepaths receive
training.

This school also welcomes individuals from other races that show special
telepathic abilities. There is no fee for gifted.


Part Four: Wom

1. F1 P8 Dim

O3 SV
-
DH 17,974km G2.33 63.5km/sec M0
A
B

W0 P8.5E10 [100,0,100,89,76] Wom

O8 SS
-
DH LT1000km G0 M0 0

W
0 P3 5E8 [100,0,100,100,68] Nydap

Home world of the Wom Coordinate. A world
shadowed in a perpetual methane
-
hydrogen
mist. Once below the clouds, the surface reveals large areas populated by active
volcanoes and large valleys. The few geologically stable l
ocations are covered with
large cities built hundreds of feet above and below ground. Also found here are large
manufacturing plants where the abundant supply of core metals is smelted and formed
into alloys. Magnetic rails crisscross the planet carrying c
argoes and Wom from one
place to another. In orbit around the star is an asteroid belt where zero G conditions
allow the Wom to make other unusual alloys. In the asteroid belt is the largest
collection of metals in known space. Here Pham builds the largest

space ships in
the Cooperation.



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2. F1M1 P9 Neit

O5 SL
-
DH 14,873 G2.2 25.7km/sec M1
A
B

W18 P6.9E8 [100,14,100,98,45] Pocc

The closest star to Dim. Another seemingly endless world of metals. Here the Wom
Institute of Metals carries out metallurgical exp
eriments. The other races send
observers to study Wom techniques. This is the main Wom naval base for their fleet.
During the war, a long range Yadeze raiding party entered the system seeking
information. They were completely destroyed. Guarding the system

is the Protector,
a 1,500,000 CM battle station, the largest free moving space structure in existence.
Experiments are being carried out to give the structure ND window capacity.



3. G1 P6 Vicon

O4 SM
-
DM 7870km G0.21 2.5km/sec M1
A
0

W0 P2.7E6 [67,0,100,
54,65] Frab

A plane
t in constant upheaval. A close
-
orbiting, large moon stirs up the planet
making the surface boil. As a result, there are constant upheavals from the planetary
core. Millions of tons of inorganic compounds bubble up from the interior.
Farb
refines these chemicals for shipment. Work occurs in space and on the only three
geologically stable locations on the planet. Described as a vision of hell, the
planet is well known for its products.


Part Four: Crys

1. G1 P5 Oh
-
Two

O8 GV
-
DM 175,000km G698 10500km/sec M8 0

W0 P0 [0,0,0,0,0] Oh
-
One

08
-
06 SL
-
DL 14,276km G0.84 9.8km/sec 0

W68(ice) P1.0E10 [63,0,89,100,0] Crys

The home world of the Crys. A series of large moons orbiting a failed star. The nearby
gas giant bombards the planets

with huge amounts of magnetic energy sending
electromagnetic waves through anything that can conduct a current. The only
artificial structures are those that shield factories and electronic shops. At the
north pole of the star is a collection of some thre
e million Crys linked together.
This is the central brain of the Crys race. Nearby is a huge magnetic launcher that
propels Crys space craft into far orbits. Crys looks like a dead world when viewed
from orbit. There are no signs of oceans, atmosphere or l
arge structures. The
southern half of the planet is occupied with a huge crystal growing farm. It is here
that Thru Five grows many of its computers.


2. G1 P8 Nu
-
Oh

08 SM
-
DH 7254km G0.25 2.9km/sec M0 0

W39(ice) P7.3E8 [91,0,100,100,0] Tee

One of the lar
gest supplies of raw materials for the Crys. Home of their naval fleet
and its major naval base. Around the planet is a ring of debris from a large carbon
asteroid that broke up. In the ring, the Crys manufacture composite materials. In
an orbiting station

are grown single crystals of huge proportions. Any sort of
crystal in any size, shape or weight can be grown on demand.


3. G1
-
M3 P2
No
-
An

09 GL
-
DM 134,783km G376 M6 4339.2 km/sec M1 0

W0 P0 [0,0,0,0,0] Thru

09
-
03

SM
-
DL 6988km G0.1 1.2km/sec 0

W57(ice) P
2.6E8 [87,0,95,100,0] Fiv

The home of Thru
-
Fiv, the largest computer company in the Cooperation. Advanced
computers are built here to control starships and planets. Advanced experiments in
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cybernetics occur under the observation of the best scientific mind
s in the
Cooperation. Here the Cooperation operates its only facility devoted to the study
of artificial intelligence.


Part Six: Flots

1. K1 P3 Floom

O2 SL
-
DM 12,986km G0.97 11.3 km/sec M0 A

W85 P7.84E10 [85,78,100,93,54] Phime

The home world of the Flo
ts. A world only visited by a few selected outsiders. The
Flots are very careful about allowing visitors on their home planet. At the capital,
Flots, sits the Court of the Monarchy, a huge building many kilometers across. Most
of the noble houses and the C
ivil Service School are also here.


2. G1 P8 Alt

O3 SM
-
DH 7865km G0.41 4.8km/sec M1 A

W97 P4.6E10 [76,99,83,92,56] Flave

A water world where the Flots grow huge amounts of sea grasses and small fish that
are their favorite foods. Fish species from Flave

are highly praised throu
ghout the
Cooperation. A highly
-
developed school of aquiculture is maintained here. The
Cooperation staffs an aquatic research facility on pl
anet. Research is carried on
using new species of fish to harvest for food.


3. F1K1 P0 Do
pp

O7 SM
-
DH LT1000km G0.0 0.0km/sec M0 0

W0 P3.1E8 [98,12,100,100,34] Dopp

Around this binary star system is a rich asteroid belt that formed out of the debris
left over from the formation of the star system. Here is the main Flots shipyard
and naval base.

The few visitors that have gone there say the entire star system
looks as if it is under construction. The Flots turn out a thousand ships of all
types each year from this system alone. Several small asteroids have been hollowed
out and filled with water
to accommodate the Flots. Three 1,000,000 CM battle
stations guard the system. The Flots say the Yadeze invaded this star system some
fifty years before the first Invasion of Mantu space. They claim no Yadeze left the
system.


4. M1 P4 Dhum

O3 SL
-
DH 10,65
8km G0.70 8.2km/sec M0 A

W64 P4.7E9 [67,77,93,100,43] Fropp

O6 GM
-
DL 74,114km G45.0 532.4km/sec M5 0

W0 P0 [0,0,0,0] Grogn

O6 1
-
5 SM
-
DM 3860km G0.02 0.2km/sec 0

W78(ice) P3.2E7 [0,54,45,50,13] Moobak

Fropp is the war planet. Here weapons research goes o
n continually. Fropp is also
the location of the Marine and Army Academies. The planet is one big arms factory.
New weapons are tested on the moons of the nearby gas giant. These moons are now
covered with craters of all shapes and sizes. Huge weapons are
tested in the Ort
cloud surrounding the star system. The Cooperation sends senior weapons designers
to this planet to learn and to exchange the latest ideas in weapon theory. If it
goes boom, it is made here.


5. K1 P8 Gom

O3 SL
-
DM 11,563km G0.70 8.2km/sec

M2 A

W58 P7.8E9 [86,85,97,74,45] Felass

The visitor planet. It is here the Flots have most of their contact with the
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Cooperation. Markets, factories, farms and industries are all represented here. Very
senior members of the nobility are stationed here wi
th full powers to speak for the
monarchy. Several major corporations have offices here to facilitate trade with the
Flots. This planet constantly jumps with activity. It has one of the busiest
starports in space.


Part Seven: The Commons

C
-
1
Peace

This is the headquarters and Capital
of the Cooperation. On this
Artificial Planetoid, the
representatives from all the races
meet to discuss matters of interest.
It is also houses the main
governmental Offices. The Director
of the Bureau of Administ
ration, or
his Deputy is stationed here at all
times. The Cooperation Trading
Commission is also headquartered
here. The most senior commanders of
all Cooperation armed forces are stationed here, as well as the headquarters for
the Third Fleet.


C
-
2:
Naval Academy

Another artificial planetoid on which is housed the premier military school in known
space. Only the best students from all the races are sent here to learn to be the
future leaders of the Navy and Marines. Each year only 10,000 are chosen fr
om all
the races for admittance. Many ship captains and most senior officers of all the
races are graduates. It is extremely difficult to get in, and real easy to get out,
but those who stay know they have gotten the best military education possible. The
N
aval Academy is also the headquarters of the Second Fleet, and the center of all
starship research activities.


Part Eight: Other Areas of Interest

1. Outside

Beyond the Mantu planet of Mantaowasha is The Outside. A

treaty area set aside after
the first Ya
deze invasion. The area is some 1500 parsecs long and 50 parsecs wide.
Inside are 265 star systems, only a few of which have been explored. Both the
Cooperation and the Yadeze have many sensor probes throughout the area. Military
ships larger than 10,000 C
M are forbidden to enter. Civilian ships are discouraged
from traveling into the area. A few Gypsy traders travel in and out, looking for
unusual cargoes or to do some exploring. Yadeze activity is periodically detected
in the area. Some Wom and Crys compa
nies operate pilot plants for mining,
manufacturing and agricultural interests are in operation here. COMGEM also has some
research facilities in this area. Exploships have looked at the planets on the
Cooperation edge of the zone, but until now no plans f
or the development of these
star systems have been made. The Cooperation can't send in the forces to patrol this
area of space and everyone knows it. This is why the area is a haven for pirates
and illegal tech companies as well as groups who don't want th
e authorities looking
over their shoulders.



2. Commons

There is an overlap between the claimed areas of Human, Mantu, Wom, Flots and D'Thal
space. This area is some 1100 parsecs across and is called the Commons. It is being
Carryall

COOP
-
1


CHAPTER 13

Page
18


BOOK TWO


© Charles J. Walther 1997, 2012




administered by the Cooperatio
n directly. New colonies are planned by all the races.
A promising area for economic development. Most of the interaction between the races
occurs in the Commons. Peace is located here along with much of the Cooperation
governmental structure.
One of the b
etter areas to stage adventures.


3. Unknown Space

Unknown space surrounds the Cooperation and the six races. On one side is the Yadeze.
There are no plans to explore in this direction. There are plans underway to expand
the area of known space in the othe
r directions. The Flots, Mantu and Humans also
have individual plans to explore the unknown areas around their own spaces. For
several years now, no major exploration has occurred. The resources were diverted
into rebuilding the armed forces to repel the e
xpected Yadeze attack. Some argue
the Yadeze would have attacked long before now. The popular idea is that the Yadeze
have learned their lessons and are occupying other areas of space. With peace in
the Cooperation, exploration plans are now going full ahe
ad. What will be found in
unknown space is anyone's guess. The Cooperation and the six races are determined
to find it first.


4. The Far Beyond

Outside the Wom and the Flots' borders is the Far Beyond. It is an area of thin star
density. Until now, not mu
ch effort has been made to explore the area. The Wom and
the Flots have recently signed a joint exploration contract to develop this area.
The agreement is that the Flots will get all the oxygen atmosphere planets while
the Wom will get the hydrogen/methan
e atmosphere planets. These two races seem bent
on excluding the other four races from the exploration and have announced that any
planets discovered will be controlled by the two races directly. This has lead to
some heavy arguments from the other races w
ho feel the discoveries should be shared
by all. The Wom and the Flots are not ready to make this concession. This problem
is currently the greatest threat to the stability of the Cooperation.


A Note about Planetary IDs

For many recently discovered or rec
ently explored planets and star systems you will see a CSI#. Once a planet is named
or settled, this number is usually dropped as the identifier for the star system. On the planet sheets in the appendix you
will see no names but only the CSI#.
Coop1 using
a three point positioning system to determine t
he coordinates of a star
system. This is called the Coop1 Stellar Identification number or CSI#.

From the Coop1 head quarters on Peace two
imaginary lines
are drawn. The first runs from P
eace through the galac
tic center and extends to the edge of the galactic
disk in b
oth directions. That is the Prime M
eridian and it bisects the galaxy
along

the galactic plane. The second line is

drawn

through Peace

perpendicular to the galactic plane

either above or below the
plane of the galaxy
.
This gives your
elevation above or below the galactic plane.
To locate any star system you first measure how many degrees
it is
m
oving
clockwise from the Prime M
eridian until you come to the locat
ion where you can draw a
line from Peac
e to the star in
question

along the galactic plane
. The second number is
t
he elevation
either positive or negative from Peace
you must
move this line
until the imaginary line runs directly from Peace to the star in question. The third number is how far alo
ng
that line in Light years you must travel until you reach the star in question.

Since each race measures time and the
geometry different
ly
, most CSI numbers are given with the species reference. All CSI#s in this game system are Human
referenced.


Example CSI #157.5
+
1.4
-
1476.3

H

You draw a line from Peace that is 157.5 degrees clockwise from the Prime Meridian, then 1.4 degrees above the galactic
plane. You extend that line 1476.3 light years and you should be at the star in question.

The H shows we

measure 360
degrees in a circle and the length of one Terran orbit as the definition of a year.