COMPUTER SCIENCE CURRICULUM 0201310 - COMPUTER PROGRAMMING ll PACING GUIDE

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Nov 3, 2013 (3 years and 5 months ago)

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COMPUTER SCIENCE CURRICULUM


0201310
-

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING ll


PACING GUIDE








Florida Sunshine State

Mathematics Standards

K
-
12


1

of 8



Computer Programming ll Honors




Pacing Guide

2

of 8

Pacing Guide

Computer Programming ll Honors


Fundamentals of Java
2/E

Lambert and Osborne

Thompson (South
-
Western)

2003


Karel J++









15 Days


UNIT 1

Getting Started with Java




15 Days


3

Lesson 1: Background

3

1.1 History of Computers

5

1.2 Computer Hardware and Software

9

1.3 binary Representation of Information


an
d computer Memory

15

1.4 Programming Languages

16

1.5 The Software Development Process

19

1.6 Basic Concepts of Object
-
Oriented

Programming

23

Summary


27

Lesson 2: First Java Program

27

2.1 Why Java?

28

2.2 The Java virtual Machine and Byte Code

29

2.3 Choosing a User Interface
Style

30

2.4 Hello World

32

2.5 Edit, Compile, and Execute

38

2.6 Temperature Conversion

42

2.7 Turtle Graphics

46

Summary


51

Lesson 3: Syntax, Errors, and Debugging


51

3.1 Language Elements

53

3.2 Basic Java Syntax and Semantics

69

3.3 Terminal I/O for Different Da
ta Types

70

3.4 Comments

75

3.5 Programming Errors

80

3.6 Debugging

85

Summary

3

of 8

UNIT 1

GETTING STARTED WITH JAVA (Continued . . .)



91

Lesson 4: Introduction to Control Statements


91

4.1 Additional Operators


93

4.2 Standard Classes and Methods


95

4.3 A
Shortcut for Inputting Data


95

4.4 A Visit to the Farm


97

4.5 The if and if
-
else Statements


101

4.6 The while Statement


105

4.7 The for Statement


110

4.8 Nested Control Statements and the break Statement


116

4.9 Errors in Loops


120

Design, Testing,

and Debugging Hints


121

Summary


125

Unit Review


UN
IT 2

THE NEXT STEP WITH JAVA



15 Days



131

Lesson 5: Introduction to Defining Classes

131

5.1 The Internal Structure of Classes and Objects

133

5.2 A Student Class

144

5.3 Editing, Compiling, and Test
ing the Student Class

149

5.4 The Structure and Behavior of Methods

153

5.5 Scope and Lifetime of Variables

159

5.6 Turtle Graphics: Colors, Pen Widths, and Movement

164

Summary


169

Lesson 6: Control Statements Continued

169

6.1 Logical Operators

182

6.2
Testing
if

Statements

185

6.3 Nested
if

Statements

188

6.4 Logical Errors in Nested ifs

192

6.5 Nested Loops

193

6.6 Testing Loops

197

Design, Testing, and Debugging Hints

198

Summary

4

of 8

UNIT 2

THE NEXT STEP WITH JAVA (Continued . . .)




203

Lesson 7: Impr
oving the User Interface


204

7.1 A Thermometer Class


204

7.2 Repeating Sets of Inputs and Type

char


206

7.3 A Menu
-
Driven Conversion Program


208

7.4 A GUI
-
Based Conversion Program


210

7.5 The GUI Program Explained


213

7.6 Other Window Objects and Met
hods


218

7.7 Formatted Output


225

7.8 GUIs and Applets


225

Summary


229

Unit Review


UNIT 3

ARRAYS, RECURSION, AND COMPLEXITY

15 DAYS




235

Lesson 8: Introduction to Arrays


235

8.1 Conceptual Overview


237

8.2 Simple Array Manipulations


238

8.3 Loopi
ng Through Arrays


240

8.4 Declaring Arrays


243

8.5 Working with Arrays That Are Not Full


245

8.6 Parallel Arrays


246

8.7 Two
-
Dimensional Arrays


249

8.8 Arrays and Methods


252

8.9 Arrays of Objects


260

8.10 Applying the Model/View Pattern to

the Case

Study


261

Design, Testing, and Debugging Hints


262

Summary



269

Lesson 9: Classes Continued


270

9.1 Class (static) variables and Methods


274

9.2 Java Interfaces
-

The Client Perspective


277

9.3 Java Interfaces
-

The Implementation Perspective


282

9.5

Inheritance and Abstract Classes


292

9.6 Some Observations About Interfaces and Inheritance


301

9.7 Acceptable Classes for Parameters and Return Values


304

9.8 Perspective


282

9.5 Inheritance and Abstract Classes


292

9.6 Some Observations About Inter
faces and Inheritance


301

9.7 Acceptable Classes for Parameters and Return Values


304

9.8 Error Handling with Classes


305

9.9 Exceptions


308

9.10 Reference Types, Equality, and Objects Identity


311

Summary

5

of 8

UNIT 3

ARRAYS, RECURSION, AND COMPLEXITY (Co
ntinued
…)



315

Lesson 10: Arrays Continued


315

10.1 Advanced Operation on Strings


319

10.2 Searching


324

10.3 Sorting


330

10.4 Insertions and Removals


334

10.5 Working with Arrays of Objects


337

10.6 BreezySwing: Menus, Scrolling List Boxes, and Di
alogs


352

10.7 The Class java.util.ArrayList


356

Summary



361

Lesson 11: Recursion, Complexity, and Searching and Sorting


362

11.1 Recursion


373

11.2 Complexity Analysis


381

11.3 Binary Search


385

11.4 Quicksort


392

Design, Testing, and Debugging H
ints


393

Summary


397

Unit Review


UNIT

4

USING ABSTRACT DATA TYPES



OMIT




403

Lesson 12: Object
-
Oriented Analysis and Design


404

12.1 Introduction


405

12.2 Overview of Analysis and Design


406

12.3 Request


407

12.4 Analysis


418

12.5 Design


426

12
.6 Implementation


433

Summary



437

Lesson 13: Linear Collections: Lists


438

13.1 Overview of Collections


442

13.2 Lists


457

13.3 Iterators


462

Summary



467

Lesson 14: Linear Collections: Stacks and Queues


467

14.1 Stacks


479

14.2 The StringTokeniz
er Class


483

14.3 Queues and Priority Queues


492

14.4 BreezySwing: Check Boxes and Radio Buttons


496

Summary


6

of 8

UNIT 4

USING ABSTRACT DATA TYPES (Continued . . .)




501

Lesson 15: Unordered Collections: Sets and Maps


502

15.1 Sets


505

15.2 Sorted Sets


507

15.3 Example Application: Word Frequencies


508

15.4 Maps


511

15.5 Sorted Maps


519

15.6 The Glue That Holds Collections Together


523

Summary


526

Unit Review



UNIT 5

IMPLEMENTING ABSTRACT DATA TYPES


OMIT



531

Lesson 16: Implementing Lists, Stac
ks, and Queues



531

16.1 Interfaces, Multiple Implementations, and Prototypes


533

16.2 The IndexedList Interface


535

16.3 The Fixed
-
Size Array Implementation of Indexed Lists


536

16.4 The Singly Linked Implementation of Indexed Lists


546

16.5 Complexi
ty Analysis of Indexed List Implementations


548

16.6 Positional Lists


553

16.7 Fixed
-
Size Array Implementation of Positional Lists


556

16.8 Doubly Linked Implementation of Positional Lists


562

16.9 Complexity Analysis of Positional Lists


563

16.10 Ite
rators


563

16.11 Implementation of Stacks and Queues


564

Summary


7

of 8

UNIT 5

IMPLEMENTING ABSTRACT DATA TYPES (Continued
…)




567

Lesson 17: Implementing Sets and Maps


568

17.1 The Set and Map Prototypes


569

17.2 List Implementations of Sets and Maps


57
0

17.3 Overview of Hashing


575

17.4 Hashing Implementation of Maps


580

17.5 Hashing Implementation of Sets


585

Summary



585

Lesson 18: Implementing Trees and Priority Queues


585

18.1 An Overview of Trees


593

18.2 Binary Tree Traversals


595

18.3 A li
nked Implementation of Binary Trees


603

18.4 An Array Implementation of Binary Trees


605

18.5 Implementing Heaps


608

18.6 Using a Heap to Implement a Priority Queue


610

Summary



UNIT 6

GRAP
HICS, FILES, APPLET, AND SWING


15
DAYS



619

Lesson 19: Simpl
e Two
-
Dimensional Graphics


619

19.1 The Conceptual Framework for Computer Graphics


625

19.2 The Method repaint


628

19.3 The Method getGraphics


630

19.4 Color


635

19.5 Graphing Data


644

19.6 Responding to Mouse Events


649

19.7 Transient and Refreshab
le Images


651

19.8 Defining and Using a Geometric Class


657

19.9 Text Properties


659

Design, Testing, and Debugging Hints


659

Summary



665

Lesson 20: Files


666

20.1 File Classes


669

20.2 File Input


680

20.3 File Output


689

20.4 Other Input/Output
Situations


699

Summary

8

of 8

UNIT 6

GRAPHS, FILES, APPLETS, AND SWING (Continued . . .)




703

Lesson 21: Introduction to HTML and Applets


703

21.1 Hypertext, Hypermedia, and the World Wide Web


705

21.2 Overview of the Hypertext Markup Language


709

21.3 Sim
ple Text Elements


712

21.4 Character
-
Level Formatting


713

21.5 Lists


716

21.6 Linking to Other Documents


718

21.7 Multimedia


720

21.8 Tables


723

21.9 Applets


727

Summary



731

Lesson 22: Swing and AWT


731

22.1 The Swing and AWT Philosophy


733

22.2

Conversion Program Implemented with GBFrame


735

22.3 Conversion Program Implemented with Swing and AWT


740

22.4 Variations on Implementing with Swing and AWT


743

22.5 GUI Components


749

22.6 Layouts


759

22.7 Events


763

22.8 Dialogs


768

22.9 The Mod
el/View/Controller Pattern


775

22.10 Applets, Swing, and AWT


777

22.11 Setting the Look and Feel


777

Summary


781

Unit Review















Marine Biology Case Study






15 Days