INST 715 (Online) Knowledge Management

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Nov 6, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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©
Scott Paquette

2013
,
College of Information Studies


1


University

of Maryland



College of Information Studies


INST 715 (Online)

Knowledge Management


Syllabus


Spring 2013


Instructor:

Scott Paquette

E
-
mail:

spaquett@umd.edu


Please note: This
syllabus may be subject to minor alteration, as needs arise, before or during the
Spring
term.


Course Description


This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of knowledge management in the
emerging

knowledge economy. The course provides a
n interdisciplinary overview of issues managers may encounter
within a knowledge
-
based environment, whether in the corporate, public sector, or otherwise. Fundamental
concepts of knowledge
will include

strategic aspects of knowledge, how knowledge is crea
ted and
disseminated, and the role of knowledge in organizations and society. Many emerging topics in the area of
knowledge management will also be discussed.


This course takes the position that knowledge begins with the individual, and to manage a coll
ective set of
knowledge one must begin at the individual level and work towards the group or organizational level.
Therefore, much of the focus is at the individual level and how people identify, create, and use knowledge.



Course Goals


1.

To provide an un
derstanding of the principles of knowledge management appropriate to issues in
information studies. This understanding will enable students to comprehend the role of research in
adding to knowledge, advancing the discipline and profession, and providing in
formation essential for
planning and decision
-
making;


2.

To enable students to identify the role of knowledge in organizations, and what strategies and tools can
help them use knowledge to create value;


3.

To enable students to identify the key issues in knowl
edge management for individuals, groups and
organizations. These issues are ever
-
changing and adapting to the business environment, and
students will be introduced to issues a manager would face in managing knowledge; and


4.

To enable students to understand

the role of the knowledge worker in organizations, and how the work
place is evolving as jobs become more knowledge
-
intensive.



©
Scott Paquette

2013
,
College of Information Studies


2


University

of Maryland


Course/Learning Objectives


By the conclusion of the course students should be able to:


1.

Demonstrate an understanding and appr
eciation of knowledge management in organizations;


2.

Identify the technologies and tools that organizations use in the management of knowledge;


3.

Understand the issues faced by teams of individuals working on knowledge
-
intensive projects; and


4.

Demonstrate an

understanding of knowledge management theories.



Text and Course Readings


Desouza, K., & Paquette, S. (2011).
Knowledge Management: An Introduction
. New York, NY:
Neal
-
Schuman Publishers, Inc.

(Available at the UMD bookstore or online book sellers)


Req
uired course readings are listed in the schedule below.
These readings are available through the ELMS
system or the University’s e
-
Journal Library
. You are also strongly encouraged to read widely current issues
in information and knowledge management found

in both practitioner and academic journals.



Prerequisites


There are no prerequisites for this course.



Instructional Methods


This is an online course, which means the content will be delivered electronically through the university’s
ELMS system. Tw
o important aspects of online courses will be used. The first is
content
, which for this
class will consist of recorded lectures and presentation slides that will be available as an ‘enhanced
podcast’. You will be able to download these lectures and view

them through QuickTime. Readings and
other online materials will also be made available, which will include PDFs, website links and other audio /
video files. Secondly, there will be opportunities to
interact

with the instructor and your fellow course
mates.
Online discussion boards and chats can be used as a form of class participation to further engage in the
course material. Of course, e
-
mail is always an option, and students are strongly encouraged to contact the
instructor with any questions.
In

addition to information gleaned from
lectures,
required and recommended
readings, students will gain insights about
information environments
from
the assignments.


Each student is responsible for completing the assigned readings, viewing the lecture video
(s) and other
supplementary materials (if applicable), and participating in the weekly online discussions. This course is
organized by 14 weekly installments aligned with the university academic calendar. Class materials will be
released online 3 weeks
in advance to allow students to work at their own desired pace. However, students
must ensure they cover all relevant materials and are prepared to contribute to the online discussions with
quality ideas.



©
Scott Paquette

2013
,
College of Information Studies


3


University

of Maryland

As we do not meet in a classroom setting, it is

imperative that students maintain open lines of
communication with the instructor. E
-
mail is the preferred method. Any questions on the materials,
assignments or course administration are always welcomed and encouraged. Students should not let
problems

or concerns go unresolved and should feel open to contacting the instructor at any time during the
term so problems can be addressed.



Course Assessment


Detailed instructions regarding each assignment will be provided. Assessment of all assignments is d
irectly
related to attention to the instructions, clarity of expression and presentation, and evidence of critical
thinking.


Case Analysis (
20
%)

-

Students will be given a case based on a real life problem concerning the
management of knowledge faced by
an actual organization. Alternatives to the problem will be analyzed in
order to provide recommendation for the organization.



Social Media Analysis (25%)



Students will chose an organization that uses social media to connect with
its internal employees

or external customers. An analysis of how social media is used specifically for
knowledge management activities (identifying knowledge, sharing knowledge, creating new knowledge, etc),
including a critical assessment on the effectiveness of social media
for the organization’s KM activities will
be presented.


Major Paper (
35
%)

-

Students will identify a current major issue or topic in the field of knowledge
management and write a paper critically examining this topic in the context of the knowledge econom
y and
the social impact to knowledge workers.



Elms Discussion Board & Twitter
Participation (
2
0%)

-

Your participation mark will be divided into two
parts, 15% for discussion on the online boards and 5% for using Twitter to communicate with your
classma
tes. Twitter will be used in this course to augment and enrich our interaction in and out of class.
Each student will register on Twitter and use this application to express thoughts, ideas and questions to
their fellow students. We will distribute the l
ist of Twitter ID’s for all the students in the course so you know
who to ‘follow’, and we will use the hash tag #introtokm to identify our ‘tweets’. Feel free to also use the
college’s hastag #iUMD to identify your comments.


Please note: Late assignment
s will be penalized by one grade per day. For example an A
-

paper that is two
days late would result in the grade of B.

Any assignments over 5 days late will result in a failing grade.



Participation


As this is an online course, participation will work

somewhat differently than an in
-
class course. On the
ELMS
-
Blackboard website, a discussion board will be established with discussions for each week of class.
Every week, the instructor will post questions related to the lecture and the readings that wil
l allow the
students to further consider the concepts and topics introduced in class. Students are expected to not only
answer questions, but also pose further questions and engage with other members of the class in order to
create a lively debate and dis
cussion. Bringing new and timely sources into the conversation is highly
recommended.




©
Scott Paquette

2013
,
College of Information Studies


4


University

of Maryland



Rules and Expectations for Online Participation:


1)

Students will participate on a regular basis, contributing to the conversations.

2)

Contributions will not repeat prev
ious posts or information, but add new ideas, opinions and views
to the conversation.

3)

Posts that not only answer questions but also pose new questions are very welcome. Originality,
innovative ideas, or posts that bring new knowledge into the conversation

are highly regarded,
including those that relate ideas based on professional experience.

4)

Students are not assessed by the quantity of posts, but the
quality

of posts. Many posts that add
little or no value to the conversation, or only repeat previously s
tated facts will not be a positive
factor in a student’s participation grade.

5)

The online space shared by all students should be considered a safe place to post ideas and
opinions. It is acceptable to respond, agree or question posts made by others. Howev
er, any
rude, inflammatory, insulting or inappropriate posts will not be tolerated. Participation marks
will be
lost
from online attacks or ‘flaming’.




Academic Integrity


Students are reminded to review the University’s Honor Code and Honor Pledge rega
rding
cheating, plagiarizing papers, and other unacceptable activities. Academic dishonesty will not be
tolerated and reported to the Honor Council.



©
Scott Paquette

2013
,
College of Information Studies


5


University

of Maryland

INST 715 Online
Class Calendar

(Spring 2013)


Date

Topics

Readings

Part I: Introduction to The Knowledg
e Cycle


Week 1
-

Jan 28
Introduction to
Knowledge




1.

Course Introduction and
Administration

2.

The Knowledge Era: What is
Knowledge (And What Isn’t It)?

3.

Managing Knowledge



Desouza & Paquette,
chapters 1 & 2

Week 2


Feb 4


The

Creation of
Knowledge


Case Assignment
Distributed



1.

Individual Knowledge Creation

2.

Group Knowledge Creation

3.

Nonaka’s SECI Knowledge Creation
Cycle



(Nonaka, 1994)


(Stewart, 1994)



Desouza & Paquette,
c
hapters 3 & 4


Week 3


Feb 11

The Distribution of
Knowledge



1.

Knowledge Sharing and Transfer:
Sticky Knowledge

2.

Motivation for Sharing

3.

Knowledge Networks (part 1)



(Michailova & Husted,
2003)


Desouza & Paquette,
chapter 6


Week 4


Feb 18

Knowledge
Organization


1.

Historical View of Knowledge
Organization

2.

Why We Organize Knowledge



(Anfinnsen, Ghinea, & de
Cesare, 2011)


Desouza & Paquette,
chapter 5



Part II: Knowledge Use in the Organization


Week 5



Feb 25

Corporate Knowledge
Strat
egies



Case Assignment Due



1.

Knowledge Management Strategy

2.

The Knowledge Based View of the
Firm



(Zack, 2003)


Desouza & Paquette,
chapter 9



©
Scott Paquette

2013
,
College of Information Studies


6


University

of Maryland


Week
6



Mar 4

Decision Making



1.

Managerial Decision Making

2.

The Role of Knowledge
in Decisions


(Buchanan & O'Connell,
2006)


(Davenport, Harris, De
Long, & Jacobson, 2001
)

(Nicolas, 2004)



Week 7



March 11

K
nowledge
Management
Systems

& Social Media


1.

Knowledge Ma
nagement Systems,
Technologies and Tools

2.

Intranets and Knowledge Portals

3.

The Role of the Internet



(McDermott, 1999)


(Levy, 2009)


Desouza & Paquette,
chapter 8



Week 8


March 18


March Break


No Class this Week



Week 9


M
arch 25
Knowledge and People




1.

Intellectual & Human Capital

2.

Managing the Knowledge Worker

3.

Knowledge Retention &
Organizational Memory



(Siebdrat, Hoegl, & Ernst,
2009)


Desouza & Paquette,
pages 213
-
230



Part III: Beyond Organizational Knowledge and Boundaries


Week 10



Ap
r 1

Knowledgeable
Innovation


Social Media
Assignment Due


1.

Knowledge for Innovation and
Discovery

2.

More than Free Software: Non
-
Market and Peer Production

3.

Creativity



(Prahalad & Ramaswamy,
2003)

(Schneiderman, 2007)

(Florida, 2005)

(Catmull, 2008)


Week 11



April 8

External Knowledge




1.

Beyond Boundaries: External
Knowledge

2.

Customer

Knowledge

3.

Multinational Enterprises and
Knowledge



(Gibbert, Leibold, &
Probst, 2002)


(Paquette, 2006)


Week 12


April 15





Week to Focus on Final Paper




©
Scott Paquette

2013
,
College of Information Studies


7


University

of Maryland

Week 13



April 22

Community Knowledge




1.

Knowled
ge in Distributed
Organizations

2.

Communities of Practice

3.

Wikis and Other Social Tools



(von Hippel, 2001)


(Barrett, Cappleman,
Shoib, & Walsham, 2004)



Week 14



April 29

The Future of KM
and
Course Wrap
-
Up




1.

What is Next for Knowledge
Management?

2.

Course Wrap
-
Up and Summary



(Yates & Paquette, 2011)


Desouza & Paquette,
chapter 10


Week 1
5


May 6


Major Papers Due




©
Scott Paquette

2013
,
College of Information Studies


8


University

of Maryland

Required Readings List


Anfinnsen, S., Ghinea, G., & de Cesare, S. (2011). Web 2.0 and Folksonomies in a
Library Context.
International Journal of Information Management, 31
, 63
-
70.

Barrett, M., Capplema
n, S., Shoib, G., & Walsham, G. (2004). Learning in Knowledge
Communities.
European Management Journal, 22
(1), 1
-
11.

Buchanan, L., & O'Connell, A. (2006). A Brief History of Decision Making.
Harvard
Business Review
(January 2006), 32
-
41.

Catmull, E. (2008).

How Pixar Fosters Collective Creativity.
Harvard Business
Review
(September 2008), 64
-
72.

Davenport, T., Harris, J. G., De Long, D. W., & Jacobson, A. L. (2001). Data to
Knowledge to Results: Building An Analytical Capability.
California
Management Review,

43
(2), 117
-
138.

Florida, R. (2005). Managing for Creativity.
Harvard Business Review, 83
(7/8), 124
-
131.

Gibbert, M., Leibold, M., & Probst, G. (2002). Five Styles of Customer Knowledge
Management, and How Smart Companies Use them to Create Value.
European

Management Journal, 20
(5), 459
-
469.

Levy, M. (2009). Web 2.0 Implications on Knowledge Management.
Journal of
Knowledge Management, 13
(1), 120
-
134.

McDermott, R. (1999). Why Information Technology Inspired but Cannot Deliver
Knowledge Management.
Californ
ia Management Review, 41
(4), 103
-
117.

Michailova, S., & Husted, K. (2003). Knowledge
-
Sharing Hostiity in Russian Firms.
California Management Review, 45
(3), 59
-
77.

Nicolas, R. (2004). Knowledge Management Impacts on Decision Making Process.
Journal of Know
ledge Management, 8
(1), 20
-
31.

Nonaka, I. (1994). A Dynamic Theory of Organizational Knowledge Creation.
Organization Science, 5
(1), 14
-
37.

Prahalad, C. K., & Ramaswamy, V. (2003). The New Frontier of Experience Innovation.
Sloan Management Review
(Summer 2
003), 12
-
18.

Schneiderman, B. (2007). Creativity Support Tools.
Communications of the ACM,
50
(12), 20
-
32.

Siebdrat, F., Hoegl, M., & Ernst, H. (2009). How to Manage Virtual Teams.
MIT Sloan
Management Review, 50
(4), 63
-
71.


©
Scott Paquette

2013
,
College of Information Studies


9


University

of Maryland

Stewart, T. A. (1994). You're Com
pany's Most Valuable Asset: Intellectual Capital.
Fortune, 130,

68
-
73.

von Hippel, E. (2001). Innovation by User Communities: Learning from Open
-
Source
Software.
Sloan Management Review, Summer
, 82
-
86.

Yates, D., & Paquette, S. (2011). Emergency Knowledge

Management and Social Media
Technologies: A Case Study of the 2010 Haitian Earthquake.
International
Journal of Information Management, 31
, 6
-
13.

Zack, M. H. (2003). Rethinking the Knowledge
-
Based Organization.
Sloan Management
Review, Summer 2003
, 67
-
71.