1 Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2 - Nebraska Library ...

maddeningpriceManagement

Nov 6, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

101 views

1
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2
 
October 30, 2009
 
Maureen Hammer, PhD
 
Knowledge Management Officer 
2
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2 
Agenda
 

Setting the stage
 

 
Who, what and why
 

 
Explicit v Tacit Knowledge
 

 
Traditional Library Approach
 

 
Incorporating KM
 

Case Study of KM and the Research Library at VDOT
 

 
Our Library Evolution
 

 
Collection
 

 
Cataloging/Taxonomy
 

 
ILL and Networking
 

 
Reference
 

Assessments and Outcomes

3
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2 
Why Knowledge Management?
 

Fewer Guilds, Apprenticeships and 
Mentoring
 

Downsizing and Rightsizing
 

Looming Retirements of Baby 
Boomers
 

Mobile Workforce
 

Knowledge Workers
 

Competitive Edge
 

Avoid Duplication of Effort
 

Changing Work Environments
 

Breaking Down Silos of Information 
and Work 
What is Knowledge Management?
 

Getting the right knowledge to the right 
people at the right time
 

Identifying, capturing, organizing and 
disseminating critical institutional 
knowledge
 

Establishing networks between people 
to share knowledge
 

Sharing lessons learned and best 
practices to avoid reinventing the 
wheel
 

Knowing the why behind decisions and 
actions
 

Knowing what we know
 

Supporting change management
 

Intangible assets of the organization
 
4
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2 
Who Provides Knowledge Management?
 

KM Professionals
 

Managers
 

Libraries
 

IT
 

HR/Organizational Development 
Who Benefits from  Knowledge Management?
 

Leadership
 

New Employees
 

Long­Term Employees
 

Partners
 

Customers/Public
 

The Organization

5
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2 
Explicit Knowledge
 

Knowledge that has been codified: Information 
Tacit Knowledge
 

Unarticulated, not codified, experience based, more 
easily shared person to person 
Nonaka 
and Takeuchi
 

Socialization: tacit to tacit
 

Externalization: tacit to explicit
 

Combination: explicit to explicit
 

Internalization: explicit to tacit 
Polanyi
 

All knowledge is either tacit or rooted in tacit, no matter 
what we are doing we are relying on background skills 
and beliefs so tacit and explicit are dimensions of the 
same knowledge
 
KM 
Library 
6
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2 
General Library Information
 

Established in 1946 with 118 items as department of the Virginia 
Transportation Research Council
 

Staffed in 1954 with paraprofessional
 

Hired professional librarian in 2002
 

Moved into KM Division in 2004
 

Increased staffing in 2005
 

Evolved from VTRC to VDOT­wide Library retaining focus on research
 

New online catalog (EOS) providing greater opportunities for service 
delivery
 

Largest state DOT library in the country

7
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2
 
Library 
KM 
Library & KM 
Library & KM 
8
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2

9
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2 
Reference Questions by District 
And Central Office 
Central Office 
107 ­ 63% 
Central Office, 107
­ 63% 
NOVA, 14 ­ 8% 
Hampton Roads, 11 ­ 7% 
Salem, 9 ­ 5% 
Fredericksburg, 9 ­ 5% 
Richmond, 7 ­ 4% 
Staunton, 6 ­ 4% 
Bristol, 3 ­ 2% 
Culpeper, 1 ­ < 1% 
Lynchburg, 1 ­ <1%
 
10
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2 
Transactions by District and Central Office 
Central Office 
551 ­ 57% 
Central Office, 551
­ 57% 
NOVA, 239 ­ 25% 
Fredericksburg, 56 ­ 6% 
Bristol, 51 ­ 5% 
Staunton, 38 ­ 4% 
Salem, 12 ­ 1% 
Hampton Roads, 10 ­ 1% 
Lynchburg, 1 ­ <1%

11
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2 
The Problem
: Engineers in the Salem District are asked to 
“pay back” FHWA funds for projects that were completed 
years ago.  If they don’t justify past work, VDOT will be 
penalized more than $10 million. 
The library is contacted with a simple reference question, 
“Do you have any RS Means Heavy Cost Data”
books?  RS 
Means produces these specialized reference books with 
tables of construction cost data issued annually.  Districts 
routinely use these but throw away “
old” books since they 
don’t have the space or need for them.  We were able to 
provide 1 of several years worth of these books from our 
collection and after a reference interview realized there was 
an urgent need for many other years 1997­2005.  All were 
out of print, and there were few libraries that retained these 
items. Immediately the library sent the information it held by 
UPS.  Simultaneously, we used interlibrary lending systems 
to see all known libraries holding these items.  The Library 
of Congress was the best option, and we arranged an 
interlibrary loan for several other volumes that day.  They 
arrived several days later and were immediately shipped to 
the district.  Two other volumes were located through used 
booksellers, and the publisher was contacted directly to 
purchase a third volume.  These were acquired and shipped 
to the district as the ILLs expired, allowing them to proceed 
uninterrupted.  The materials were on loan for close to a 
year before we received them back. 
How the library helped:
 
­
Through reference interview to not 
just answer the question, but 
understand the true underlying need. 
­
We made the Library of Congress’ 
collections accessible to VDOT 
employees in a time of dire need. 
Only a professional library could 
have done that. 
­ Unlimited loan period for all items. 
­ No cost, fast turnaround ordering of 
new materials and shipping to client. 
­ Follow up several times along the 
way to ensure the patron had what 
they needed. 
12
 
Defining KM 
Implementing ways to better utilize the expertise 
that we have
—people and information—
to 
improve ongoing processes and procedures and 
to retain critical knowledge. 

Maximizing Intellectual Capital” 
Strength of Ties
 
• 
Strong Ties 
Dense – supports knowledge redundancy 
Communities of Practice 
• 
Weak Ties 
Loose – 
supports creativity and innovation 
Knowledge Mapping
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2

13
 
Strong Networks 
Institutional 
Functional 
Technical 
Who to Call 
Who Knows What 
­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­
 
How­to 
Experience
 
Referrals 
Career Information
 
Interpretation of Explicit 
Knowledge
 
Weak Networks 
Institutional 
Functional 
Technical 
Who to Call 
Who Knows What 
­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­
 
Historical
 
Professional
 
Cross­Functional 
Lessons Learned
 
Isolation 
By Choice 
Lack of Support by Management 
New to Organization 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2
 
14
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2 
RSBs
 

Combines Explicit and Tacit Knowledge
 

In­depth analysis
 

Document Deliver
 

Supports Decision Making

15
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2
 
16
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2

17
 
Knowledge Management 
The Challenge:  A VDOT construction project is halted by the 
Army Corps of Engineers.
 
A VDOT project involves building a new bridge approach and 
repaving the road leading to it.  The team is reclaiming asphalt by 
milling it up, and laying down a new deck. Their solution is an 
elegant one, decreasing overall costs and delivering the overall 
project ahead of time and under budget by using the reclaimed 
asphalt as fill for the new bridge approach. Only the Army Corps 
of Engineers halts the work over concerns that use of recycled 
asphalt pavement (RAP) in this way could lead to contamination 
of groundwater. 
Within 30 minutes, however, we discover a researcher who wrote 
his dissertation the legitimacy of this approach, as well as a 
recent article in Public Roads.  With about 6 hours of staff tim

the library puts together RSB 4 (RSB 4: Leaching Characteristics 
of Recycled Asphalt Pavement: RAP May Be Suitable As a Fill 
Material
 
).
When this RSB is presented to the Army Corps of 
Engineers the project is allowed to continue.
 
How the library helped:
 
­ RSB literature search 
­
Web searches for 
expert contact 
information. 
­ Bibliography of scientific and peer 
reviewed literature provided 
­ 
Found known experts, vetted 
them to establish credibility 
­ cited other published research, 
selecting only most relevant peer 
reviewed and trade research. 
18
 
Knowledge Management 
The Challenge:
Virginia’s Secretary of Transportation is 
approached by business leaders and activist groups who want 
VDOT to explore “tidal power”, specifically devices that will attach 
to VDOT structures to produce energy.  Is this an opportunity for 
VDOT to show leadership and for Virginia businesses to receive 
stimulus money, or an unworkable idea? 
We did extensive literature searches and contacted 
several known experts for extensive interviews on the 
topic.  We also did a complete review of worldwide 
projects related to tidal in stream energy conversion, the 
technology that allows for submerged water turbines to 
convert tidal flows into electricity.  We also researched 
the tidal power potential for Virginia coastal areas.  As it 
turns out, Virginia has a low potential for tidal in stream 
energy conversion, and despite demonstration projects 
(including a small scale project in New York’s East 
River…which was cited in the articles presented to the 
secretary, but which has been plagued with problems), it 
turns out that worldwide there is not yet a vendor that 
produces tidal turbines. 
How the library helped:
 
­ RSB literature search 
­
Web searches for
contact 
information on known experts 
­ 
Actual interviews with experts. 
­ Bibliography of scientific and 
peer reviewed literature provided.
10 
19
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2 
Lessons Learned Support
 

Taxonomies
 

Retrievability
 

Findability
 
20
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2
11 
21
 
Knowledge Management 
The Challenge
: A legislator asks “Why can’t we 
just use trees for noise abatement instead of 
sound walls?
” 
Are trees effective?  Nobody can 
find the science behind the claim.
 
Library staff consults with an environmental researcher 
(out of the office but available by cell) and a vibration 
expert at VDOT via phone.  As it turns out, even most 
AASHTO and TRB literature references the limited 
capacity of trees for noise abatement along roadways, 
but none present the science (proof) behind the 
assertion.  However, VTRC had explored the exact 
issue in 1973, issuing the VTRC report 73­R30 
“Effectiveness of Trees and Vegetation in Reducing 
Highway Noise” which explains in part why the library 
had one of the most complete collections on the topic 
of any library in the country. The smoking gun was a 
1971 report by the U.S. Forest Service that was cited 
heavily by 73­R30 and several other peer reviewed 
studies of the time.  Of more than 100 million unique 
item records in libraries at the time, representing more 
than 1 billion books and other materials, only one 
known copy of the 1971 report existed, and it was held 
by the VDOT Research Library, which had done 
original cataloging on it a year earlier.
 
How the library helped:
 
­ Fast response reference. 
­ One of the best collections on the topic 
in the country. 
­ A system that allowed us to quickly 
locate the best 30 items out of our 40,000 
volume collection. 
­
Willingness to analyze the state of the 
art for the topic. 
22
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2 
Communities of Practice Support
 

Special Collection of Support Material
 

Supports Knowledge Base of Individuals and Groups
12 
23
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2
 
24
 
“I appreciate the library's 
assistance….which helped in preparing 
cost analysis to justify the federal 
participating funds used on the projects 
from 1997­2005. So far the Salem District 
Construction Engineer has discovered we 
were able to justify approximately 
$6,000,000.00 dollars of the funds spent on 
two of the projects.  The Federal Highway 
Administration still has to review the cost 
justifications on eleven of the construction 
projects.  Hopefully our group justified the 
spending of the other $4,000,000 dollars in 
question on the other projects to the FHWA 
review committee.  (Library User from 
Salem District, received 8/11/09) 
Thank you again for your help on 
providing valued info to us. I have gotten 
info through your library many times since 
I joined VDOT in 1992. Your efforts have 
contributed to publications of Several 
VDOT papers/articles and even led to 
National Awards such as Rumble Strips. 
We are prepare a challenging article now 
and your info will be used in it.
 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2
13 
25
 
For more information: 
Maureen.Hammer@VDOT.virginia.gov 
434
­293­
1987 
Knowledge Management and Libraries: Part 2