and their impact on

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Oct 22, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

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Genetically modified foods
and their impact on
stakeholders in Virginia


University of Richmond

Environmental Studies Senior Seminar

Spring 2005


Jessica Kitchin, Adam Renick, Amy Terepka

Dr. David Kitchen

Trends in Biotechnology


About ¾ of processed
foods in the average
supermarket have GM
ingredients


GM crop production
has increased by
double
-
digits for the
past nine years


Majority of GM acreage
in U.S. corn, soybeans,
and cotton

Virginia and Biotechnology


Crop value in 2003 represents $718 million


Estimated $5.6 million of that came from GM
crops


Relatively small proportion compared to
major agricultural states


Multiple universities and research institutions

GM Applications


Input based


Bt

crops contain bacterium that acts as a pesticide


HT crops are modified to resist certain herbicides


Output based


Product enhancement


Biopharmaceutical


Proposed Benefits


Economic


Farmers


Jobs


Environmental


Lower pesticide use


Health


Nutritional benefits



“Golden Rice”

Proposed Risks


Economic


Corporate control


Cross contamination


Environmental


Increased herbicide use


“Superweeds” and
“Superpests”


Health


Allergy


Antibiotics


Ethical Concerns



US vs. Europe


Difference in consumer
reaction


Trust in agriculture


Trust in regulatory bodies


Media differences

Virginia Stakeholders

Ukrop’s Consumer Survey


53 percent knew nothing or very little about subject
of GM foods


80 percent believed they had consumed a GM food
product


Those with opinion on GM foods generally had
negative reaction


Consumers were contradictory in their perception of
GM foods and in their prioritization of factors
(environmental, health, economic)


“Conscious non
-
issue”

Virginia Stakeholders


Research Institutions/ Universities


Biotechnology Industry/ Seed Companies


Farmers


Retailers


Consumers


Advocacy Groups


Government


Virginia Stakeholders


Research Institutions/ Universities


Biotechnology Industry/ Seed Companies


Farmers


Retailers


Consumers


Advocacy Groups


Government


Virginia Stakeholders


Research Institutions/ Universities


Biotechnology Industry/ Seed Companies


Farmers


Retailers


Consumers


Advocacy Groups


Government


Future of Biotech in Virginia


Virginia’s best investment in the
biotechnology industry is with research and
development of further technologies


Output based technology is the best prospect
for agriculture


GM opposition can create niche market for
farmers and retailers

Questions


GM labeling


Is it necessary? If so, what will
it take?


When will consumers get involved?


At what point does the precautionary principle
need to override immediate or temporary
benefits?


Is this the right technology and the right time
for the state of Virginia?