MMAN3300 Engineering Mechanics 2 - School of Mechanical ...

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Oct 30, 2013 (3 years and 5 months ago)

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ENGINEERING


SCHOOL
OF MECHANICAL AND MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING









MMAN3300



Engineering Mechanics
2



S
ession
1
, 20
13






Contents

Page

Course staff

2

Course
details and aims

2

Rational for inclusion of content
and

teaching approach

4

Teac
hing strategies

Assessment

4

4

Course schedule

5

Resources for students


6

Academic honesty and plagiarism


Course evaluation

7

8

Administrative matters


8




2


Course staff


Lecturers

Dr Zhongxiao Peng (
course convener)



A/Prof
.

Nicole Kessissoglou

Room M14







Room M15

Tel (02) 9385 4142






Tel (02) 9385 4166

Fax (02) 9663 1222






Fax (02) 9663 1222

Email
z.peng@unsw.edu.au





Email
n.kessissoglou@unsw
.edu.au


Head tutors

Dr Ann Lee






Dr Huaizhong Li

Room ME
109e





Room ME116

Tel (02) 9385 4
637





Tel (02) 9385 5587

Email:
ann.lee@unsw.edu.au




Email:
huaizh
ong.li@unsw.edu.au


Consultation concerning this course is available on Tuesday
2
-
4pm
. Direct consultation or phone is
preferred; email should only be used as a last resort as it uses your time and
ours

less efficiently.


Course details

and aims


Units of

credit


This is
a 6 unit
-
of
-
credit (UoC) course

and involves 6 hours per week (h/w) of face
-
to
-
face contact.

Y
ou should aim to spend not less than about 10 h/w on this course,
that is,

an additional 4 h/w of
your own time. This
time
should be spent in mak
ing sure that you understand the lecture material,
further reading about the course material, completing the
on
-
course assessments
, and revising and
learning for the
quizzes and final
examination.


This course is a sequel to MMAN1300 Engineering Mechanics

1
. In MMAN1300, you

learned
about
S
tatics
-

the equilibrium of bodies under the action of forces
,

and

D
ynamics
-

the motion of
particles

and rigid bodies
.


This course covers engineering mechanics and mechanical vibrations. Part of the emphases of this
cou
rse is the
plane dynamics of rigid bodies and practical applications
. Another part of the course
aims on building your understanding of
mechanical vibrations
. You will develop an understanding
of the concept of vibration and the main components of vibrator
y systems. This course constitutes
an important component of the basic engineering sciences.


This course is a prerequisite for
MECH4100

Mechanical Design

and MECH4320
Engineering
Mechanics 3
.


Aims of the course


By the end of this course it is expected t
hat you will be familiar with:



P
lane kinemati
cs and kinetics of rigid bodies.



E
quations of motion, work and energy for r
igid bodies.



T
he principles and functions of gears and gear trai
ns and gear motion analysis.



Si
ngle degree
-
of
-
freedom spring
-
mass
-
damper

sys
tems, free and forced vibration,
undamped/damped responses.



T
wo degree
-
of
-
freedom systems, free and forced vibration
.



Vibration of continuous systems.



3


Student learning outcomes


At the conclusion of this course, it is expected that you will be able t
o:



S
olve kinematics and ki
netics problems on rigid bodies,



A
nalyse the given mechanism,



B
e familiar

with gears and gear trains,

and gear motion analysis



W
rite and solve the equations of mo
tion for SDOF and 2
-
DOF systems,



W
rite the mass and stiffness matric
es and find the natural frequencies and modeshapes for 2
-
DOF systems
,



Develop and solve the wave equation for simple continuous systems,



F
ind the natural frequencies and mode shapes for simple continuous systems and interpret the
effects of different bound
ary conditions.



Graduate attributes


UNSW’s graduate attributes are shown at

https://my.unsw.edu.au/student/atoz/GraduateAttributes.html


UNSW graduates will be


1.

Scholars who
are:

(a)


understanding of their discipline in its interdisciplinary context


(b)


capable of independent and collaborative enquiry




(c)


rigorous in their analysis, critique, and reflection





(d)


able to apply their kno
wledge and skills to solving problems





(e)


ethical practitioners

(f)


capable of effective communication









(g)

information literate









(h)

digitally literate


2.

Leaders who are:

(a)


enterprising, innovative and creative

(b)


capable of ini
tiating as well as embracing change

(c)


collaborative team workers











3.

Professionals who are:

(a)


capable of independent, self
-
directed practice









(b)


capable of lifelong learning

(c)


capable of operating within an agreed Code of Practic
e


4.

Global Citizens who are:

(a)


capable of applying their discipline in local, national and international contexts


(b)

culturally aware and capable of respecting diversity and acting in socially just/responsible



ways

(c)
capable of environment
al responsibility









4


Rationale
f
or inclusion of content and teaching approach


This course is included to
give you the tools necessary to analyse the motion of rigid bodies,
forces/moments to generate the motion and the fundamentals of vibration analy
sis
.

Lecture material
and tutorial exercises have been carefully selected and a wide range of asse
ssment activities will be
given to support the learning and teaching approach
.



Teaching strategies


The teaching approaches that will be used include:



Prese
ntation of the material (derivations and examples) in lectures



Tutorials to help students to understand and solve problems



Laboratory experiments

to assist in understanding the fundamentals taught in lectures



Series of quizzes which require students to
reg
ularly study their lecture material.



Assessment








Part A

(Mechanics)

Part B

(Vibrations)



Assignments

(5% ea)



1 (5%)



1 (5%)





Lab exercises

(10% ea)


1

(10%)



1

(10%)

Quizzes

(5% ea)


2 (10%)



2
(10%)

Final
E
xam

(50%
)



(25%)



(25%)



Total (100%)




(50%)



(50%)




In order to pass the course, you must achieve an overall mark of at least 50%.


The award of a supplementary exam (if required) will
NOT

be granted unless
ALL

on
-
course
assessment has bee
n submitted by the required due date
.


The submission of assignments and lab reports
should have a standard School cover sheet. All
submissions are expected to be neat and clearly set out.
Assignments

and reports

should be
submitted direct
ly

to the assignm
ent
box for MMAN3300

by

the
due
date.


Late submission of work will incur a 10% penalty per day unless a medical certificate is provided.
Failure to submit or attend all on
-
course assessment (assignments, laboratory exercises and reports, test,
essay) may
result in failure of this course.



Final
Examination


There will
a

3
-
hour
formal exam

at the end of the semester, covering all material in both Parts A
and B for the
entire

semester.


You will need to provide your own calculator

with a UNSW “Approved” st
icker on it

for the
final
exam
. The list of approved calculators is shown at

https://my.unsw.edu.au/student/academiclife/assessment/examinations/Calculator.html
.


Special
consideration and supplementary assessment


For details of applying for special consi
deration and conditions for the award of supplementary
assessment, see
Administrative Matters for All Courses
,
available from the School
website
.

5


Course schedule


Lecture:

Tuesday


1
2
:00



1
4
:00

Mathews Theatre A



Thursday

14:00



16:00

CLB 7

Tutori
al:


Thursday


9
:00



11
:00


ME301, ME304, ME402, ME403,

TETB LG07, LG09

Lab class
:

Details to be provided

in the semester


Lecturers will be given by Zhongxiao Peng (part A) and Nicole Kessissoglou (part B)

Week

Topics

Ref
erences

Assessment

Graduate
attributes
assessed

1

Part A
:
Plane
kinematics
of rigid

bodies


Velocity analysis

Chapter 5/1
-
5/
4

Meriam
&

Kraige




2

Method of instant centres

Chapter 5/5
Meriam
&

Kraige

Chapter 4

Waldron &
Kinzel



3

Acceleration
a
nalysi
s

-

Review of
a
cceleration

-

"Coriolis
t
ype" problems

Chapter 5/6
-
5/7 Meriam
&

Kraige

Assignment 1

1(c), 1(d)

4

Kinetics of rigid bodies

Chapter 6/2
-
6/
9

Meriam
&

Kraige

Quiz 1



5

Gear systems

Chapter 10.1
-
10.5

Waldron & Kinzel




6

Gear
a
nalysis

Chap
ter 12.1
-
12.5

Waldron & Kinzel


Lab 1

1(c), 1(d),
1(f), 2(c),
3(a)

7

Part B
: Vibration

Introduction to mechanical
vibration

F
ree vibration of a
single
DOF spring
-
mass
-
damper

Logarithmic decrement

Chapter 2 Rao


Quiz 2



8

Forced
harmonic
vibration

Rotati
ng unbalance

Base excitation

Chapter
3

Rao



9

Free vibration of a

2
-
DOF system

Chapter
5

Rao

Assignment 2


1(c), 1(d)

10

Forced
harmonic
vibration

of
2
-
DOF system
s

Chapter 5
, 9

Rao

Quiz 3


11

Continuous systems

Transverse vibration of
strings

Longitudi
nal
vibration
of bars

Chapter
8

Rao

Lab 2

1(c), 1(d)

12

Continuous systems

Torsional vibration of bars

Bending vibration of
beams

Chapter
8

Rao


1(f), 2(c),
3(a)

13

Revision


Quiz 4


The
above

course schedule is an indication only.

6


Resources for studen
ts


Textbooks


Meriam, J.L. and Kraige, L.G.
Engineering Mechanics
-

Dynamics
, S
I Version, Sixth Edition,
Wiley, 2007

(E
-
text:
http://au.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/product
Cd
-
EHEP002601.html
)


Rao, S.S.
Mechanical Vibrations
, SI

Edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, 2011


Waldron, K.J. and Kinzel, G.L.
Kinematics, Dynamics, and Design of M
achinery
, second edition,
Wiley, 2003


These books are available in the UNSW
l
ibrary and boo
kshop.


Suggested additional reading


Hibbeler, R.C.
Engineering Mechanics


Dynamics
, Prentice Hall, New Jersey


Beer, F.P. and Johnston, E.R.,
Vector Mechanics for Engineers


Dynamics
, McGraw
-
Hill, New
York


Wilson, C.E. and Sadler, J.P.
Kinematics and

Dynamics of Machinery
, Third Edi
tion, Prentice Hall,
New Jersey


Dimarogonas, A.
Vibration for Engineers
,
second edition
, Prentice H
all International, 1996


Thomson, W.T.
Theory of Vibration with Applications
,
fourth

edition,

Stanley Thornes, 1998


Inman,

D.J.
Engineering Vibration
, Pr
entice Hall International, 1996


Additional materials provided in
Moodle


This course has a website on Moodle which includes:



copies of assignments;



laboratory experiment handout;



a discussion forum.


The discussion forum is
intended for you to use with other students enrolled in this course. The
head tutors and
course convenor will occasionally look at the forum, monitor the language used and
respond to
any frequentl
y
-
asked questions
. If you want help from the
head tutors and

the lecturers

direct contact is preferred.


Other
r
esources


If you wish to explore any of the lecture topics in more depth, then other resources are available and
assistance may be obtained from the UNSW Library.



One starting point for assistance is:


info.library.unsw.edu.au/web/servicesfor/index.html.





7


Academic Honesty
a
nd Plagiarism


What is Plagiarism?

Plagiarism is the presentation of the thoughts or work of another as one’s own.* Examples include:




direct duplication of the thoughts or work o
f another, including by copying material, ideas or
concepts from a book, article, report or other written document (whether published or
unpublished), composition, artwork, design, drawing, circuitry, computer program or software,
web site, Internet, other

electronic resource, or another person’s assignment without
appropriate acknowledgement;



paraphrasing another person’s work with very minor changes keeping the meaning, form
and/or progression of ideas of the original;



piecing together sections of the wor
k of others into a new whole;



presenting an assessment item as independent work when it has been produced in whole or
part in collusion with other people, for example, another student or a tutor; and



claiming credit for a proportion a work contributed to a

group assessment item that is greater
than that actually contributed.†


For the purposes of this policy, submitting an assessment item that has already been submitted for
academic credit elsewhere may be considered plagiarism.


Knowingly permitting your
work to be copied by another student may also be considered to be
plagiarism.


Note that an assessment item produced in oral, not written, form, or involving live presentation,
may similarly contain plagiarised material.


The inclusion of the thoughts or w
ork of another with attribution appropriate to the academic
discipline does
not
amount to plagiarism.


The Learning Centre website is main repository for resources for staff and students on plagiarism
and academic honesty. These resources can be located v
ia:


www.lc.unsw.edu.au/plagiarism


The Learning Centre also provides substantial educational written materials, workshops, and
tutorials to aid students, for example, in:




correct referencing practices
;



paraphrasing, summarising, essay writing, and time management;



appropriate use of, and attribution for, a range of materials including text, images, formulae and
concepts.


Individual assistance is available on request from The Learning Centre.


Students

are also reminded that careful time management is an important part of study and one of
the identified causes of plagiarism is poor time management. Students should allow sufficient time
for research, drafting, and the proper referencing of sources in pr
eparing all assessment items.


* Based on that proposed to the University of Newcastle by the St James Ethics Centre.
Used with
kind permission from the University of Newcastle


Adapted with kind permission from the University of Melbourne.


Further info
rmation on School policy and procedures in the event of plagiarism
is presented in a
School handout,
Administrative Matters for All Courses
, available from the School website.




8


Course evaluation and development


Feedback on the course is gathered periodi
cally using various means, including the Course and
Teaching Evaluation and Improvement (CATEI) process, informal discussion in the final tutorial
class for the course, and the School’s Student/Staff meetings. Your feedback is taken seriously, and
continua
l improvements are made to the course based, in part, on such feedback.


In this course, recent improvements include restructuring the course contents and continuously
improving the dynamics part of the course.



Administrative matters


Information about e
ach of the following matters is presented in a School handout,
Administrative
Matters for All Courses
, available from the
School website
.


It is essential that you obtain a copy, read it carefully and become familiar with the information, as
it applies to
this course and to each of the other courses in which you are enrolled.




Expectations of students (including attendance at lectures and tutorials/laboratory
classes/seminars; and computer use, for example, in the use of email and online discussion
forums)




Procedures for submission of assignments and the School’s policy concerning late submission




Information on relevant Occupational Health and Safety policies and expectations:


www.ohs.unsw.edu.au




Examination procedures and advice concerning illness or mi
sadventure




Equity and disability


Students who have a disability that requires some adjustment in their teaching or learning
environment are encouraged to discuss their study needs with the course convenor prior to, or at
the commencement of, their course
, or with the Equity Officer (Disability) in the Student Equity
and Disabilities Unit (SEADU) by phone on 9385

4734, email seadu@unsw.edu.au or via the
website


http://www.studentequity.unsw.edu.au


The office is located on the Ground Floor of the Goodsell

building (F20).


Issues to be discussed may include access to materials, signers or note
-
takers, the provision of
services and additional exam and assessment arrangements. Early notification is essential to
enable any necessary adjustments to be made.



Z
. Peng & N. Kessissoglou

February

201
3