Demand Response

louisianabodyElectronics - Devices

Nov 21, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

88 views

Demand Response

and the

Utility of the Future

Phil Davis, Senior Manager

Demand
Response Resource Center


Schneider
Electric

(404) 567
-
6090


http://blog.schneider
-
electric.com/main/category/smart
-
grid/


www.schneider
-
electric.us/go/utility

What is “Smart Grid”


A Marketing Term (IEC)


Communications enabled Electric Grid (lots of
people)


Interactive (Silicon Valley)


Health Hazard (Tin Hat Crowd)


A Colossal Bore (The
Americal

Public)


The strongest civilization altering force since sliced
bread (me and all the smart people)

What is “Demand Response”?

US Federal Position:




It is the policy of the United States

that time
-
based pricing and
other forms of demand response….shall be encouraged, the
deployment of such technology and devices….shall be facilitated,
and unnecessary barriers to demand response participation in
energy, capacity and ancillary service markets shall be
eliminated.”




US Energy Policy Act of 2005, Sec. 1252(f)

US DOE Demand Response Definition:



Changes in electric usage by end
-
use customers from their
normal consumption patterns in response to changes in the
price of electricity over time, or to incentive payments
designed to induce lower electricity use at times of high
wholesale market prices or when system reliability is
jeopardized.





What is “Demand Response”
Really
?

Demand Response is how we do that:



Everything about an (intentional) electron’s journey is shaped by
someone’s desire to accomplish a goal. Those goals are determined by
the vast community of electron users; i.e., customers. In that sense,
everything a utility does is Demand Response.


Electrons obey the laws of Physics:





They travel to ground over the paths of least resistance. Our
job is to get them to do a little work along the way without
wreaking havoc, which they like to do.




Now is the time to re
-
design demand response to meet societal and
investor goals of efficiency and environmental stewardship

What does Energy Efficiency
mean on a Smart Grid?


Envelopes and Distribution are as efficient as
possible until the next kWh of savings is more
costly than a kWh of generation


Microgrids


Conservation Voltage Reduction


Robust interactivity (device to device or grid to
grid)


Efficiency defined outside of economics is doomed
to failure

Market Drivers

We need to solve these challenges

to make the difference!

Growing pressure
on infrastructure

Rising consumption

Volatile Wholesale
Energy costs

Tighter economic
pressure

Fiercer global
competition

More ambitious
environmental goals

Water shortages

Regulatory
demands

Complex sourcing
options

Sustainability and
Carbon Management

Economic Driver #1: Congestion

Economic Driver #2: Reliability

Commercial Building Facts:



Owner: Rockefeller Group Development Corp.



Location: 1221 6
th

Ave, Mid Manhattan NY



Peak Load: 12.5+ MW



Size: 49 stories plus 4 sub floors and “attic”



Tenants: Residential, Data Center, Restaurants,
Commercial Offices



Building Automation System


TAC Continuum



DR


Originally enrolled 600kW in NYISO
ICAP demand response program

Economic Driver #3: Energy Costs

Integrated Efficiency Planning



Environment




Procurement




Reporting
(SOX)




Efficiency




Safety




Reliability




Stability

From Left Field: The Utility of the Future

Monolithic

Spends Money to Make Money

Silo’d


Functions

Banker

Distributed


Operator

One Way

Central Plant

Efficient Operator

Automated

Customer

Engaged

Capital Asset

Manager

Serves Customers to
M
ake
M
oney

Inevitable Changes


Infrastructure and service, not energy, become revenue
drivers


Electrical attributes become the products


Regulatory regime changes


Distributed energy sources and microgrids


Key Standards adoption=business efficiency


Load shapes will matter


Designing for today’s energy environment will limit the
life of business investments


Energy Efficiency=Economic Efficiency



1999


Groupe Schneider

becomes

Schneider Electric,

focused on
Power & Control

1975


Merlin Gerin

joins Groupe
Schneider

1988


Telemecanique

joins Groupe
Schneider

1991


Square D

joins
Groupe
Schneider

1996


Modicon,
historic leader in
Automation, becomes a Schneider

brand

2007


Acquisition of

APC corp.

THANK YOU!

Phil Davis

Schneider Electric

Phil.Davis@Schneider
-
Electric.com

404
-
567
-
6090

1836


Creation of
Schneider


at Le Creusot, France


19th
century

20th
century

21st
century

2000


Acquisition of

MGE UPS Systems

2003


Acquisition of

T.A.C

2005


Acquisition of

Power Measurement Inc.

2003
-
2008

Targeted acquisitions in
wiring
devices and home automation


(Lexel, Clipsal, Merten, Ova, GET,
etc.)

2008

Acquisition of

Xantrex,
leader in renewable
energy solutions

Steel

Industry

Energy Management

Power &

Control