Strength of Materials - Southern Polytechnic State University

lochfobbingMechanics

Oct 30, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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Southern Polytechnic State University

Engineering Division

ENGR 3131 (3
-
3
-
4
)

STRENGTH OF

MATERIALS

Spring 2009: Lecture

1
1
:00


11:50 MWF and Lab
2
:00
-

4
:
30

T

or

R



Professor:

David R. Veazie, Ph.d, P.E.





Office Phone: (678) 915
-
4
993

Office:


Bldg: K
-
149






Office Hours: M
W

4
:
3
0
-
6
:00

& T 5
-
7

Email:


dveazie@spsu.edu







Website:
http://met.spsu.edu/dveazie




Course
Text

H
ibbeler, R.C., “
M
echanics of Materials”, 7
th

Edition, Pearson
-
Prentice Hall, I
SBN:
0
-
13
-
220991
-
8



PREREQUISITES
:

ENGL 2010, ENGR 2214


Course Goals

To provide a broad
understanding of

the deformation of solid bodies when they are in equilibrium
. S
pecifically,

to determine the internal stresses, strains, and displacement produced by the applied loads.



200
8
-
200
9

Catalog Description:

A study of stress and strain of deformable bodies in tension, compression, bending, and torsion. Topics
covered inclu
de: axial stress and strain; thermal stress and strain; statically indeterminant systems; torsional
stress and strain; power transmission in shafts; bending stresses in beams; beam deflections; combined
stresses; elastic buckling in columns; and finite ele
ment analysis methods.



The students completing this course will be able to

achieve an understanding of these topics
:


Course Outline (
Chapter
Topics Covered)


1.

Introduction to Stress and Strain
(1, 2, and 3)

a) Normal and Shear Stress and Strain







b) Tension, Compressi
on, and Shear Loading Modes





c) Allowable Stresses and Loads

d) Mechanical Properties of Materials and Hooke’s Law







2.

Axially Loaded Members

(4)

a)

Displacement of Axially Loaded Members





b)

Statically Indeterminate Structu
res


c) Thermal Stresses and Strains






3.

Torsion

(5)

a)

Torsion of Circular Bars







b)

Transmission of Power by Circular Shafts




4.

Beam Bending (6 and 7)

a)

Shear Force (V), and Bending Moment (M)

Diagrams


b)

Relationships Between Load (q), V,

and M


5.

Stresses
, Strains and Design of

Beams
(6 and 7)

a)

Normal Strains and Stresses in Beams



b)

Transverse
Shear Stresses in Beams



6.

Beam Deflection

(12)

a)

Beam Deflection by the D
ouble Integration Method




b)

Method of Superposition


7.

Analy
sis of Stress and Strain
(9 and 10)

a)

Transformation of Stresses and Strains (2
nd

Order Tensors)

b)
Principle Stre
sses and Maximum Shear Stress

c
)

Mohr’s Circle

d
) Combined
Loadings (Pressure Vessels



Chapter 8
)

8.

C
olumns, Stability, and Buckling

(13)

a
)

Buckling and Stability


b)

Columns with Pinned Ends and Other Support Conditions

9
.

Introduction to Finite Element Analysis

and Energy Methods (14)

a)

Theory, Meshes, Boundary Conditions, Displacements and Tractions



Course Procedures

The subject areas
will be covered through reading assignments, lectures, films, and demonstrations. Students
are required to attend class during the assigned times.
If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to get
the assignments and have them completed on time
. All

students are expected to attend the lectures and
will be responsible for
everything

discussed in class
.

Late assignments will not be accepted
. The student
must attend every quiz or exam at the scheduled time and date. Absence from any exam without
prior

a
pproval results in a zero for that exam.
DO NOT WRITE ON THE BACK OF SHEETS

(Points will be
taken off the assignment for this)
.

Make
-
up exams will
not

be given.

Your textbook should be brought to
every class.

NOTE: There is no ‘curving’ of final grades!



Grading

Your course grade will be determined as follows:



Examinations and Quiz







50 %

Homework/Projects/Attendance
/Participation
/Lab




2
5

%


Final Examination





25

%

Total








100 %


[90
-

100% = A, 80
-

89% = B 70
-

79% = C 60
-

69% = D Below 60% = F]



ADA/504 Compliance

Students with disabilities who believe that they may need accommodations in this class are encouraged to
contact the ATTIC counselor working with disabilities at (678) 915
-
7361, R
oom J
-
253 as soon as possible
to better ensue that such accommodations are implemented in a timely fashion. Accommodations are best
implemented at the beginning of the semester.



Student Conduct

A display of academic dishonesty, as defined in the general

catalog, will result in the most severe punishment
permissible. This includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, and disorderly conduct. Please refer to the

Undergraduate Catalog sections “Disruptive Behavior and Academic Dishonesty” and “Stude
nt Life
Regulations” for further information.


Reference Books and Other Sources:

1.

Introduction to the Mechanics of Solids, Crandall, McGraw
-
Hill

2.

Statics and Mechanics of Materials, Riley, Sturges, and Morris



3.

Mechanics of Materials, Beer and Johnson

4.

Intr
oduction to the Mechanics of Solids, Popov, Prentice
-
Hall

5.

J.M. Gere, Mechanics of Materials, Brooks/Cole

6.

Additional Handouts, Library and Internet research.