CONNECTION DETAILS FOR

lifegunbarrelcityUrban and Civil

Nov 26, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

62 views

Michael P.
Culmo
, P.E.

Vice President of Transportation and Structures

CME Associates, Inc., East Hartford, CT


CONNECTION DETAILS FOR
PREFABRICATED BRIDGE

ELEMENTS AND SYSTEMS

Learning Outcomes

After completing this Module, you will be able to:


identify roadblocks to accelerated bridge construction


identify the resources for locating Connection Details
for PBES


describe features of PBES that improve the quality of
the finished product


recognize a typical construction schedule for a bridge
built with PBES


recall ways to save money by using ABC and PBES

Roadblocks to Accelerated
Construction

The primary concerns that owner agencies have
with respect to adopting accelerated
construction techniques are:


Need for Quality Details


Durability


Design Methodologies and Training


Construction Methodologies




“Connections Details for Prefabricated
Bridge Elements and Systems”


FHWA has developed this manual


This publication is intended to provide information
that will go a long way to answering all four of the
previous concerns.


Focus on details that have been used in the past.

“Connections Details for Prefabricated
Bridge Elements and Systems”

Project Goals:


Gather details of Connections that have been
used on accelerated bridge construction projects


Investigate transfer of technology from other
markets into the bridge market


Parking Garages


Stadiums


Buildings


“Connections Details for Prefabricated
Bridge Elements and Systems”

All details need to pass a critical test before being
published in the document:


Does the connection result in a rapid construction
process?


Does the connection transmit the forces between
elements effectively?


Is the connection durable?


Is it cost effective and easy to construct?


If a process or connection is proprietary, is there more
than one supplier?


State DOT’s


Questionnaires sent via e
-
mail


Federal Agencies


Researchers (previous and current)


Producers/Fabricators

Sources of Data

Forward

Table of Contents

Section 1

General Topics

1.1

Introduction

1.2

Accel. Construction
Overview

1.3

Applicability to
Typical Bridges

1.4

Typical Connection
Types

1.5

Seismic
Considerations

1.6

Materials

1.7

Tolerances

1.8

Fabrication and
Construction

Section 2

Superstructure
Connections

2.1

Deck Systems

2.2

Adjacent Butted
Beam Systems

2.3

Decked Stringer
Systems

2.4

Modular
Superstructures

2.5

Connections to
Substructures

Section 3

Substructure
Connections

3.1

Pier Systems

3.2

Abutment Systems

3.3

Wingwalls and
Retaining Walls

Section 4

Foundation
Connections

Appendices

Appendix A

Notations

Appendix B

Connection Design
Examples

Appendix C

Standard Products

Appendix D

Sample Const.
Specifications

Appendix E

Case Studies

Appendix F

Glossary

Manual Organization

Connection Data Sheets


Precast Cantilever Abutments

Precast Integral Abutments


Precast Piers


Precast Piers

Precast Decks on PS Beams

Precast Decks on Steel Framing

Precast Decks

FRP Decks

Everything shown can be prefabricated

Total Bridge Element Prefabrication

Complete Bridge Element
Prefabrication

New Hampshire Project


How fast can we build a bridge?


Experimental project


All components prefabricated


115 foot span


Precast cantilever abutments


Clock started after old bridge

was removed


Roadway open to traffic in 8 days


Time Lapse Video on
YoutubeTM



Search “Epping Bridge Construction”






Manual Distribution


Availability


Published June 2009


Is available through FHWA
Highways for LIFE website



www.fhwa.dot.gov/hfl/





Other Sources for Details


Utah DOT ABC Website


www.udot.utah.gov

(search ABC)


Piers, abutments, walls, decks


PCI Northeast


www.pcine.org

(Bridge resources)


MassDOT


Working on new ABC manual


NCHRP Report 681


Development of a Precast Bent Cap
System for Seismic Regions


Web search “NCHRP Report 681”

Schematic Design

of a Prefabricated Bridge

Case Scenario


4 lane bridge over an expressway


Existing bridge has deteriorated beyond repair


Heavy traffic on both roadways


A temporary bridge or staged construction is an option


The local business will accept a short term closure with
the detour


As opposed to a long term staged project


Establish the detour and accelerate the bridge
construction to less than 30 days

Existing Bridge

Leaking Deck Joints

Low Clearance

Salt spray attack from vehicles

Salt spray attack from vehicles

Existing bridge issues

Proposed Bridge Type

After a formal study, the owner opted for the

following structure criteria:


Continuous steel girders (weathering steel)


Reduce to a two span bridge


Increase clearance by raising approach grades (3’)


Use integral abutments (no deck joints)


Composite concrete deck


Membrane waterproofing and Bituminous wearing surface


Open steel railings (galvanized)

Move substructures away
from roadway

No Deck joints

Build new piers and
abutments in new locations

Increase vertical clearance

Proposed Bridge

Sources of details

-

FHWA Connections manual:



Connection Details for Prefabricated Bridge Elements and Systems


1.
Review Chapter 1


Investigate connection types, materials, tolerances

2.
Search applicable sections of other chapters for details

-

NCHRP Report 681

“Development of a Precast Bent Cap System for Seismic Regions”

-

Utah
DOT ABC Standards


Connection Types Chosen


The owner chose the following connection types


Grouted reinforcing splice couplers


Quick, proven system


Can develop full bar strength


Simplifies the design process (same as CIP)


Grouted PT Ducts


Provides significant adjustability at cap
connection


Grouted Voids


Corrugated metal pipe voids for integral abutments


Small blockouts for pinned connections (approach slabs)


Concrete Closure pours between precast elements


Use for a limited number of connections (slower)

Grouted Reinforcing Splice Couplers


Emulates a reinforcing
steel lap splice


Multiple companies




non
-
proprietary


Used in precast

parking garages, stadiums
and bridges


Installation video

on
youtube


Search “Georgia Pier
Construction”


Grouted Reinforcing Splice Connectors

NCHRP Report 681 Detail

Grouted PT Duct


Similar to grouted sleeves


Used in several states


Tested for high seismic regions


Significant adjustability


Details, specifications and design
information available

Footing to Sub
-
grade Connection

Footing to Footing Connection

Use CIP Closure Pour


Cast closure pour during structure erection


Design precast for structure DL


Design continuous footing for total loads


Footing to Column Connection

Column to Cap Connection

Use details from NCHRP
Report 681


Completed Pier

Footing to subgrade
connection

Column to footing connection

Column to cap connection

Footing to footing
connection

Abutment Details


Integral Abutment to piles


Section 3.2.3.1 Precast Integral
Abutment to Piles


Corrugated metal pipe voids


Place over pile and fill with concrete


Detail developed by Iowa DOT


Used in other states also


Reduces element weight


Has large capacity to


transfer pile loads


Shear transfer via shear friction

Abutment to Pile Connection

Abutment Cap to Cap Connection


Use Utah DOT
Details


Concreted key


Use integral
diaphragm to
link caps
together


Approach Slab Connection

Completed Abutment

Pile to cap connection

Approach slab connection

Cap

to cap
connection

Beam to Deck Connection

Deck to Deck Connections

Deck to Deck Connections

Deck to Deck Connections

PC Deck Connection Details

Superstructure to Abutment Connection

Use CIP Closure Pour


Utah DOT Detail


Allows for significant
adjustability


Provides connection between
abutment stem elements


Integral Abutment Connection

Longitudinal PT

Longitudinal crown
connection

Transverse slab
connection

Connection to beam

CIP Curb

Completed Superstructure

Complete Bridge

Precast Integral
Abutment

Membrane waterproofing
with bit. Wearing surface

Precast Pier

Precast full depth
composite deck

Estimated Construction Schedule

Task
Demo Existing Bridge
Install Foundations
Erect Beams
Install Deck and PT
Closure Pours
Curb Pour
Railings
Paving
Approach Roadway
Clean-up
5 Days
8 Days
3 Days
3 Days
3 Days
3 Days
3 Days
2 Days
17 Days
2 Days
Week 1
Week 2
Week 3
Week 4
Costs


Typical New Bridge (Cost=$175/
sf
)

=

$2,200,000



Premium for ABC (assume 20%)


=


$440,000



Temporary Bridge (Cost=$50/
sf
)


=


($620,000)






Net Savings


=


$180,000


Note: These prices will vary greatly by region



Other Cost Savings


Ways to reduce bid prices with ABC


Standardization


Programmatic (not one of a kind)


Reduced project site costs (trailers, etc.)


Reduced maintenance of traffic costs


Inflation


Other Non
-

Bid Savings with ABC


Fewer police details


Reduced agency costs during construction (staff time)


User Costs


Plus: $$ can be significant


Minus: $$ not in the budget



Quality


FL has had very good success with precast
piers in very harsh environments


CT has had Precast full depth decks in place
for over 20 years


Crack Free Deck


Excellent condition


Integral abutments eliminate deck joints




By elimination of temporary bridges or costly stage construction
schemes,
and accounting for reduced agency costs

you
CAN

have all three

Rapid
Construction

High Quality

Low Cost

You can only
have any two

Old Adage

Conclusions


It is possible to build a complete bridge in 30 days (or less)


The FHWA manual provides a starting point for a complete
bridge prefabrication project


New details are coming on line all the time


NCHRP Report 681, Utah DOT, PCI Northeast (www.pcine.org)


You do not need to sacrifice quality to get rapid
construction


You can save money on an accelerated bridge project by:


Reducing construction time


Eliminate temporary bridges or staging


Module Conclusions

You should now be able to:


identify roadblocks to accelerated bridge construction


identify the resources for locating Connection Details
for PBES


describe features of PBES that improve the quality of
the finished product


recognize a typical construction schedule for a bridge
built with PBES


recall ways to save money by using PBES



Questions

culmo@cmeengineering.com