Arrow ECS Executive Brief - Industry Analyst Series

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Jul 30, 2012 (4 years and 8 months ago)

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Arrow ECS Executive Brief
-

Industry Analyst Series

Analyst Report:
Magic Quadrant for Unified Communications

Analyst and Author:
Gartner Research



Date:

August 22, 2011



Executive Summary:
Microsoft is a Leader in Unified Communications.


IBM is
a
Challenger.


IBM strengths are its partner strategy, and strong presence.

Gartner put undue
emphasis on telephony capability and discounted Social Business as a relevant factor in IBM's
vision.

In general, Challengers have potential to be Leaders, but

do not address specific
requirements.

General Study Highlights

The overall UC market has matured and evolved significantly in 2011. The most notable change has been
the shift in emphasis from broad UC portfolios toward fuller (more integrated) UC suites.
The emerging
generation of UC suites will be an improvement over the UC portfolios, in that interoperability within
the suite should be seamless, the administration will be centralized and the deployment will be easier.
Although the suites vary in function
ality and maturity, they represent an attractive trend, and Gartner
expects UC suites to become the dominant product paradigm during the next two years. Within these
suites, messaging (e.g., email and unified messaging) tends to remain a separate decision
and messaging
solutions generally interoperate with most environments without difficulty. Other important factors
influencing the market were the convergence of cloud and on
-
premises UC functions, the increased role
of consumer products and the continued
influence of mobility.

Leaders include:

Avaya, Alcatel
-
Lucent, Cisco, Microsoft, Siemens

Challengers include:

IBM, NEC

Visionaries include:

Mitel Networks

Niche Players include:

Aastra, Digium, Huawei, Interactive Intelligence, ShoreTel, TeleWare, Toshib
a


IBM Highlights

IBM's Unified Communications and Collaboration (UC2) portfolio is based on Sametime collaboration
products, Lotus Notes/Domino messaging and the Eclipse client framework. Sametime's primary
capabilities include IM, presence, and Web confe
rencing. Other capabilities include telephony and
video, which are offered though partnerships. Sametime also offers both IBM and partner collaboration
options. Enterprises should consider UC2 if they have investments in IBM Lotus functions, can leverage

the collaboration strengths of the product, or want to operate a multivendor telephony environment.


Strengths

IBM has a clear partner strategy based on coexistence on the back end and consolidation on
the front end. On the back end, IBM offers its own key server functions in some areas, while supporting
multiple
-
partner communication servers and business applica
tions. On the front end, IBM encourages
consolidation through the use of the Sametime client, or, alternatively, it enables services to be
integrated via middleware and a common Eclipse client framework and Web services. IBM has a strong
brand, partner n
etwork and professional services organization, all of which assist Sametime in obtaining
account visibility and marketing presence. In addition, IBM has now removed the Lotus brand and is
calling the product IBM Sametime, which is likely to strengthen the
product's appeal in non
-
Lotus Notes
email environments.


Cautions

Sametime has not established itself in the UC market. UC deployments, especially those
involving telephony, remain limited. The plan to integrate on
-
premises Sametime with cloud
-
based
Lot
usLive has also not established itself.


-

Competitive Issues

Although Sametime's PBX
-
neutral strategy has good points, the leading UC suites in the market all now
incorporate fully integrated functionality. This will leave IBM at a disadvantage with enterp
rises that
want to consider single
-
vendor solutions for the entire suite. In addition, most of IBM's Sametime
telephony partners now offer competing full UC suites.


Cisco and Microsoft

maintained their strong position in the Leaders quadrant,
Cisco
adva
nced a more
integrated approach with its UC 8.x release. It also successfully integrated its existing video solutions and
the Tandberg acquisition, clarified the WebEx options and released its Jabber client.
Microsoft

released
Lync (an evolution of its OC
S product) and enhanced its telephony capabilities. Microsoft now has
references that use only Lync for telephony, which is an important milestone. Microsoft also made
important UC as a service (UCaaS) advances with the release of Office 365, which include
s Lync
-
Online.
Microsoft's pending acquisition of Skype is likely to lead to Skype
-
integrated Lync offerings.

Avaya
continued to strengthen its Aura suite and added the Flare gesture
-
oriented user interface (UI).
Siemens and Alcatel
-
Lucent

solidified thei
r UC suite offerings, which are now among the more mature
full suites on the market. This advanced them into the Leaders quadrant. They will now need to prove
that they can gain market and mind share in this competitive and converging market.


-

Partnering O
pportunities

IBM continues to pursue its "coexistence" strategy, using Sametime as a front end and for its
collaboration solution, while partnering for telephony and video on the back end.


Huawei Technologies
Headquartered in China, Huawei offers a broad
portfolio of UCC functionality. The
UC application functionality is located in the SoftCo family of hardware and software platforms. The
solution offers telephony (IP
-
PBX) functionality, conferencing, PC client and UM, as well as contact
center functionali
ty and integration options with Microsoft, IBM and others.


The
Mitel UC
suite can be integrated with IBM Sametime, as well as Microsoft Lync, including a Lync
remote call control (RCC) integration option. It also offers several strong options for messagin
g and
mobility. In addition to interoperating with third
-
party conferencing offerings, Mitel has released its own
video, audio and Web conferencing offerings.


Siemens’ OpenScape

is a mature, fully functional, all
-
software, all
-
SIP UC solution. It is bein
g certified to
work as a virtual VMware environment. Although the suite is complete, elements of the portfolio are
offered as stand
-
alone solutions. The suite can also be integrated with leading collaboration applications
and third
-
party UC solutions, such

as those from IBM and Microsoft. The suite can be integrated on any
standard SIP product.

*Content sourced with permission of Gartner

Arrow ECS Executive Brief
-

Industry Analyst Series

Analyst Report: Magic Quadrant for Social Software in the Workplace

Analyst and Author: Gartner Research, Nikos Drakos, Jeffrey Mann, Carol Rozwell, Tom Austin


Date: August 25, 2011


Executive Summary

IBM is in the leader quadrant.

Caution: Microsoft and Jive are also in leader quadrant and
scored slightly better in
execution and vision. IBM strengths are in its ecoystem, scalability, and
vision.

Contrary to industry definitions of Social Business, Gartner treats SharePoint
collaboration features as "social networking," which some dispute.

General Study Highlights

As

investments in enterprise social software grow into enterprise
-
wide initiatives, the IT organization
must ensure that social software aligns with other information management initiatives. Increasingly,
enterprises are emphasizing integration with related
investments, such as: Content management,
compliance and search; a broader communication infrastructure for email, presence, real
-
time
conferencing, voice and video; and a specific business activity, such as customer support.


The options for buying
enterprise social software products continue to broaden and now include:

-

Social application vendors
that offer primarily self
-
contained social software functions (albeit
with some integration points to allow for information flow to and from other systems),

including
Atlassian, blueKiwi, Igloo, Jive, Moxie Software, MindTouch, Novell, Socialtext, and Telligent.

-

Enterprise platform vendors
with a broad, deep presence across the enterprise, particularly
with portals, content, application development and deploy
ment, workflow, search and other
capabilities. This cluster includes: IBM, Microsoft, Drupal, Ektron, EPiServer and OpenText.

-

Business application vendors,
especially those already supporting horizontal "people
processes," such as performance management
and learning, or people
-
intensive vertical
business processes, such as account management and customer service. Such vendors include
Cornerstone OnDemand, Mzinga, Saba, salesforce.com and SuccessFactors.


Enterprises continue to invest because they need t
o support community hubs, idea sharing, expertise
location, project teams, social intranets, collaborative document authoring and better communication.
Since 2010, enterprises have started to implement internal activity streams and social networking as
ano
ther way to achieve these objectives. Buyers must know which activities they want to support in
order to choose the right vendors and products. Vendors of social applications, enterprise platforms
and business applications are now targeting the market for

social software in the workplace.


As more products become "good enough," IT buyers are being more influenced by the vendors' strength
in adjacent markets. Vendors can fairly easily put together entry
-
level social software technology as a
product. Vendo
rs understand the functional criteria we use for this Magic Quadrant (such as profiles and
authoring). They can embed open
-
source platforms and components in commercial products to make it
even easier to bring them to the market. And all vendors featured i
n this Magic Quadrant have reached
a respectable level of enterprise acceptance. However, this apparent stability hides some fundamental
changes occurring in the market for enterprise social software. For example, vendors from other, more
established softw
are categories have started to enter this market. Within the enterprise, social software
has started to evolve into an information
-
sharing platform. The leaders of social initiatives should factor
these and other trends into their strategic plans, and make

buying decisions based, in part, on how
vendors will adjust to the new realities, not just on their current products and market position.


As a result, the market is seeing more collaboration and social technology from many different kinds of
vendors whos
e products align in different ways to other IT systems, based on technical integration or
simply packaging. Some products share common repositories or infrastructure with other applications.
Some share a common user interface that enables collaboration and

social functions to be embedded in
another system. Some have common user profiles, metadata and object models, while others align in
terms of marketing, licensing, or packaging and bundling.


-

Leaders include:

IBM, Jive, Microsoft

-

Challengers include:

Atlassian, OpenText, Saba

-

Visionaries include:

Drupal
-
Acquia, Salesforce.com, Socialtext, SuccessFactors, Telligent

-

Niche Players include:

Cornerstone, Ektron, EPiServer, Igloo, Liferay, MindTouch, Mzinga,
Novell


IBM Highlights

IBM is in the Leaders' q
uadrant. IBM Connections was one of the first products to target this market.
Other products in IBM's portfolio


such as Lotus Quickr, Sametime, Domino and the WebSphere Portal
Server


can broaden the applicability of Connections.


Strengths


-

Ecosystem

and viability:
IBM has extensive resources, well
-
developed channels and a large
ecosystem of system integrators and third
-
party suppliers to support its offerings.

-

Scalability:
IBM has a long experience of dealing with large customers with demanding
requ
irements. It can point to several examples of very large and complex implementations.

-

Vision:
Social business is identified by IBM as an important part of its strategic future. IBM has
conducted extensive research into how organizations need to change to become social
businesses.


Cautions


-

Complexity:
As IBM relies on several products to address

more diverse requirements, each one
a large product in its own right, implementations can become complex.

-

Consulting:
IBM's products typically require extensive installation and customization work
usually performed by consulting business partners.

-

Techn
ology:
Users report that the user interface can be difficult to get used to, and that product
installation and integration are more difficult than they expected.


*Content sourced with permission of Gartner


Arrow ECS Executive Brief
-

Industry Analyst S
eries

Analyst Report:
Magic Quadrant for Externally Facing Social Software

Analyst and Author:
Gartner Research, Jeffrey Mann, Nikos Drakos, Adam Sarner, Tom Austin, Carol
Rozwell, Chris Fletcher
Date:

August 25, 2011


Executive Summary

In its first
year, IBM is a Challenger.

Jive is a Leader and Microsoft a Challenger.


IBM
strengths are in its ecoystem, scalability, and vision. In general, Challengers have potential to
be Leaders, but do not address specific requirements.

General Study Highlight
s

Vendors of externally facing social software have focused on adding functions to meet expectations in a
swiftly developing market. However, the next functions to be added involve more risk for customers,
and vendors have only just started to help them en
sure that deployments achieve their goals.

Products in the EFSS market support external teaming, communities and networking where most
participants are outside the enterprise (for example, customers, affiliates, alumni, developers, members,
contractors, pa
rtners, trainees and resellers). Buyers seek general
-
purpose, persistent virtual
environments in which participants can create, organize and share content, as well as collaborate,
organize activities, socialize, and develop or exploit social relationships,

both with each other and with
the hosting organization.


We define the market by buyers' behavior, rather than by vendors' statements of intended use. EFSS has
a wider set of buying and influence centers than most enterprise software. Business functions a
re either
directly involved in or actually make the buying decisions for externally facing products. IT departments
are more likely to drive buying decisions about internal systems, especially when the platforms are
deployed across the enterprise. Buy
ers of EFSS include:


-

Business executives (such as product managers, channel managers, product developers,
strategists and business architects).

-

Personnel in other internal support organizations (such as program managers and business
architects) involved

in specific strategic initiatives (such as innovation, social responsibility and
special projects).

-

IT professionals working in the IT organization, or in various other support or business functions.


Leaders:
The Magic Quadrant features only two
Leaders: Jive and Lithium. The small number of Leaders
indicates that this market is still at an early stage of development. These vendors have established
themselves in the market with widely
-
used social software and collaboration offerings. They have
rec
ognized user needs in this market early, have significant market presence, and have succeeded in
delivering attractive suites with broad capabilities in offerings that include both services and software.


Challengers :
The two vendors in the Challengers q
uadrant, Microsoft and IBM, are the stalwarts of the
collaboration market. Their offerings have the potential to make them Leaders, but currently lack a
specific focus on the requirements of the EFSS market.

Visionaries include:

The three Visionaries


Dru
pal
-
Acquia, Liferay and Telligent


demonstrate
strong understanding of current and future market trends, such as the importance of a flexible,
transparent user experience, as well as the value of mutual reinforcement between tools that
encourage user cont
ribution and tools that facilitate bottom
-
up formation of groups and organizational
structures. Their products and product road maps exhibit innovation, especially in architecture and
lightweight integration, while their marketing and R&D efforts align wit
h the open
-
source ecosystem.
Visionaries have not exhibited the scope of delivery of Challengers or Leaders, but they have
demonstrated vision across a range of capabilities.


Niche Players include:

The 11 Niche Players are Adobe, Demand Media, Ektron, EPi
Server, Huddle,
Igloo, INgage Networks, MindTouch, Mzinga, ONEsite and OpenText. They provide useful, focused
technology, understand changing market dynamics, and work to evolving their product capabilities.
However, they are held back by narrow functions,

a product road map that lacks urgency, or the
absence of an innovative growth strategy.


IBM Highlights

IBM enters the Magic Quadrant as a Challenger. It offers several products to address the EFSS market
under the Customer Experience Suite banner, primar
ily IBM Connections and WebSphere Portal Server.
Other IBM products such as Lotus Quickr and Sametime can optionally be integrated with these to
provide document management and real
-
time communications functions respectively.


Strengths:


-

Viability and ec
osystem:
IBM has extensive resources, well
-
developed channels and a large
ecosystem of system integrators and third
-
party suppliers to support its offerings.

-

Scalability:
IBM has long experience of dealing with large customers with demanding
requirements. It can point to several examples of very large and complex implementations.

-

Vision:
Social business is identified by IBM as an important part of its strategic future. IBM

has
conducted extensive research into how organizations need to change to become social
businesses.


Cautions:


-

Complexity:
Because IBM relies on several products to address EFSS requirements, each one a
big product in its own right, implementations can
become large and complex, even for
seemingly straightforward requirements.

-

Consulting:
IBM's products typically require extensive installation and customization work,
usually performed by consulting business partners.

-

Technology:
Users report that the us
er interface can be difficult for users to get used to, and
that product installation and integration are harder than they expected.


*Content sourced with permission of Forrester


Arrow ECS Executive Brief
-

Industry Analyst Series

Analyst Report:
Mobile Collaboration, Q3 2011

Analyst and Author:
The Forrester Wave™, by Ted Schadler

Date:
August 5, 2011


Executive Summary

IBM is a Leader in Mobile Collaboration.
IBM LotusLive Meetings strengths are in a strong cross
-
platform support, security an
d desktop support.

Cisco and Saleforce.com are also Leaders.

General Study Highlights

The future belongs to a new application architecture that Forrester calls the mobile app Internet,
defined as “an architecture of native apps on smart mobile devices lin
ked to cloud
-
based services that
provide a context
-
rich experience anytime, anywhere.”2 In this architecture, where user expectations
for quality and latency are very high, the winning mobile collaboration solutions are:


∙ Designed to run well on any mobi
le device.

With so many different mobile platforms and form factors
to target, vendors will have to organize differently, code differently, and execute differently. Design
skills grow ever
-
more important (and scarce); new abstraction layers that separate p
resentation from
interaction from back
-
end services are required; and teams must design for mobile first. Startups have
an easier time with this new approach than established vendors.


∙ Delivered as a cloud service.

Latency is already a problem for distri
buted organizations. Even waiting
for email to upload or download to a remote site can be painful. And access to team sites and even the
file system from a hotel room over a virtual private network (VPN) can be excruciatingly slow. The
problem is the lack
of capacity, bandwidth, and data close to the device. The solution is cloud suppliers
with data centers around the world and points of presence in every major city. The cloud is simply
better for delivering good mobile app experiences.


Mobile
collaboration means putting collaboration workloads onto all
-
important smartphones and
tablets, then delivering a great user experience anywhere, anytime, on any device. This is a high bar to
clear, but we found 13 vendors able to clear it. In Forrester’s
15
-
criteria evaluation of mobile
collaboration vendors, we found that Adobe, Box, Cisco, IBM, salesforce.com, SugarSync, Skype, and

Yammer led the pack because of their commitment to tablets and smartphone platforms as well as a
strategy aligned with the n
eeds of the mobile workforce: low latency, cloud reach, and platform
support. We also found many Strong Performers


AT&T, Citrix, Dropbox, Evernote, and Google. In this
handpicked group of mobile collaboration vendors, no vendor slipped into the Contend
er or Risky Bet
categories


at least as it relates to mobile support.



Leaders include:

Adobe, Box, Cisco, IBM, Skype, Salesforce.com, SugarSync, Yammer

Strong Performers include:

AT&T, Citrix, Dropbox, Evernote, Google



There are important Leaders in

each of the three main categories: mobile current offering, mobile
strategy, and mobile market presence:



Box, IBM, and Yammer lead in
mobile current offering scores
. Current offering scores are determined
by how many smartphone and tablet platforms
the product runs on and by scores for security,
administration, and user reviews. These vendors have strong cross
-
platform support, in IBM’s case going
back many years. IBM’s LotusLive Meetings excels also in security and desktop support. Content
synchroni
zation and distribution vendor Box gets high marks in Apple App Store reviews. Yammer’s
scores are balanced across most current offering attributes.


Skype, Box, Yammer, and Cisco lead in
mobile strategy scores
. Strategy is determined largely by the
vendo
r’s strategy for cloud reach and the mobile app architecture (the balance between native apps and
cloud services) as well as by the number of years with a mobile solution and the organizational
commitment. Skype wins on architecture and years in market. Bo
x wins on mobile and cloud
architectures as well as organizational commitment. Cisco wins on cloud reach and mobile architecture.
Yammer wins on mobile app architecture.


Skype, Cisco, and Google lead in
mobile market presence scores
. Market presence is d
etermined by
the number of paying customers, paying users, and downloads. Skype’s global reach and longevity
contribute to its market presence scores. Cisco’s scores are determined largely by the momentum of
existing customers moving meetings to mobile. Go
ogle wins because of its installed base of paying
customer licenses and downloads.

IBM Highlights


IBM, Box and Yammer lead in mobile current offering scores.
Current offering scores are determined
by how many smartphone and tablet platforms the product r
uns on and by scores for security,
administration, and user reviews. These vendors have strong cross
-
platform support, in IBM’s case going
back many years. IBM’s LotusLive Meetings excels also in security and desktop support. Content
synchronization and di
stribution vendor Box gets high marks in Apple App Store reviews. Yammer’s
scores are balanced across most current offering attributes.


IBM LotusLive Meetings has good multiplatform, multidevice support.
IBM has almost doubled the
size of its mobile devi
ce development team in the last year to port this webconferencing app to iPad,
iPhone, Android, and soon RIM’s products. Coupled with IBM’s cloud delivery model and enterprise
grade security and administration, this product has the mobile support that busi
ness customers need.
However, IBM has fewer mobile webconferencing customers than Adobe, Cisco, or Citrix.


*Content sourced with permission of Forrester



Arrow ECS Executive Brief
-

Industry Analyst Series

Analyst Report:
Enterprise Social Platforms, Q
3 2011

Analyst and Author:

The Forrester Wave™, by Rob Koplowitz

Date:
August 24, 2011


Executive Summary

IBM is a Leader in Enterprise Social Platforms, as is Jive.

IBM strengths are in vision, integration with
the entire IBM portfolio, as well as
third
-
party offerings, technology, execution, and customer
satisfaction.

Given Forrester weighed social capabilities more than Gartner, SharePoint was relegated to
Strong Performer, and NOT Leader.

General Study Highlights

Forrester’s technology adoption surveys point to a shift in software investment growth from more
mature software categories


like enterprise resource planning (ERP), human capital management
(HCM), and supply chain management (SCM)


to more people
-

or ne
twork
-

centric software. Consider
that 37% of IT decision
-
makers plan to implement or expand the use of collaboration tools in 2011
compared with 25% or less who are planning investments in ERP, HCM, product life
-
cycle management
(PLM), and SCM app categor
ies.


The client interest in social platforms is fueled by three factors:


∙ The desire to capture and re
-
use knowledge
. As corporate networks grow into digital landfills,
Forrester’s clients are looking to apply mature content management ideas


like ver
sioning and life
-
cycle management


to social communications. Ensuring that the right hand knows what the left is
doing remains paramount as well. For example, a client in basic materials manufacturing recently told us
the story of how plant staff who had
previously never communicated are now sharing manufacturing
recipe formulation best practices in their internal social communities.


∙ The need to maintain human connections across a disparate workforce
. Particularly in North

America, remote and mobile wor
k is becoming the norm as two
-
thirds of the workforce works remotely
at least occasionally.


∙ The pressure to modernize systems to meet new workforce demands
. Highly empowered, tech
-
savvy
individuals are entering the workforce, joining the 40 million Gen
Yers already in the workplace.3 With
four or more years of Facebook etiquette, three
-
way calling attacks, and celebrity Twitter
-
stalking, these
new workers are not inundated by media and social technologies; they demand and thrive in it.
Enterprises that l
everage these individuals have found success riving technology behavior change.
Enabling the consumerization of social technologies is in the enterprise is the next step to supporting
innovation and advocacy among employees.


In Forrester’s first ever, 62
-
criteria evaluation of enterprise social platform vendors, we found that IBM,

Jive, NewsGator, and Telligent led the pack due to breadth and depth of functionality and long
-
range
strategy. Microsoft has added substantial social functionality to its SharePo
int platform. Atlassian
launched forward, broadening its core wiki offering, while Socialtext executed on its pioneering vision
around capabilities like microblogging. Giants Cisco and OpenText are looking to get in on the action by
extending their enterpr
ise footprints. Content and collaboration professionals should use this report and
associated spreadsheet tool as a starting point for evaluating how these vendors’ products fit with their
particular requirements.


Leaders include:

IBM, Jive, NewsGator, T
elligent

Strong Performers include:

Atlassian, Cisco, Microsoft, Socialtext, OpenText


IBM Highlights


IBM Connections.
IBM has recently changed the branding on the Connections product from Lotus to
IBM. This is in line with its vision of “social everywh
ere” and the positioning of the offering as an
adjacent technology to the entire IBM portfolio (as well as third
-
party offerings) and not just a
collaboration play. It also better represents Connections technology underpinnings that are based on
Java and a

relational database as opposed to the more proprietary technologies normally associated
with the Lotus brand. IBM continues to take an aggressive approach to the enterprise social platform
market introducing major new releases on a yearly basis that keep
the offering highly aligned with
consumer trends. As the product approaches its fifth birthday, numerous customers have moved to
broad and increasingly mission
-
critical implementations. A key goal on the part of IBM that Forrester will
track closely is its

desire to build a significant third
-
party ecosystem that will be attractive to prospective
buyers.


-

Competitive Issues

IBM, Jive, NewsGator, and Telligent have the edge.
As the market moves from early experimentation to
real production deployments, four v
endors have moved into the lead in terms of depth and breadth of
offering, market presence, and strong executive leadership. IBM continues to move fast and exploit
early bets on social. The company is now actively integrating Connections with its broader p
ortfolio


including its portal, content, and business intelligence product lines. Jive continues to drive to establish
and lead “social business” as a new software category. With strong momentum and an application
marketplace coming on line this year, 201
1 could prove a pivotal year in its quest. Telligent maintains a
razor
-
sharp focus on analytics, a platform designed from the ground up for extension, and a growing and
impressive stable of partners. NewsGator takes SharePoint’s social offering to higher l
evels through its
close partnership with the software giant.


Jive SBS.
Much of Jive’s senior management team came from Mercury Interactive where they played the
role of David to IBM and Hewlett
-
Packard’s Goliath. The experience continues to serve them we
ll as
they now take on IBM and Microsoft, among others, in social technologies.


Socialtext.
The pioneer in enterprise social continues to grow and refine its offering. Socialtext was
among the first to offer an enterprise
-
grade wiki and to respond to new
social trends like microblogging.
Most recently, the company has built out a rich set of social capabilities. And Socialtext’s conversations
with customer show that the vendor is committed to successful implementations. As more traditional
vendors like IBM

and Microsoft flex their muscles in the high end, Socialtext has placed a market
emphasis on the mid
-
market with aggressive pricing and a business
-
focused professional services
offering.


*Content sourced with permission of Forrester