GLOBAL SMART GRID FEDERATION - Swedish Smartgrid

lettucestewElectronics - Devices

Nov 21, 2013 (3 years and 6 months ago)

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GLOBAL SMART GRID
FEDERATION

Accelerating the deployment of smart grids
around the world

OVERVIEW


What is GSGF?



Smartgrids: a global agenda with many viewing
angles



A global perspective

3

OVERVIEW


What is GSGF?



Smartgrids: a global agenda with many viewing
angles



A (or more) European perspective(s)


4

GLOBAL SMART GRID FEDERATION


The Global Smart Grid Federation directly links
international smart grid associations thereby
facilitating the sharing of best practices on
resolutions around barriers to deployment;
consumer engagement; innovation and capacity
building.







1) Speed of Technology versus Regulation

2) Developing Interoperability Standards

3) Gaining Consumer Interest and Support

4) Protecting Intellectual Property Rights

5) Defining Stakeholder Needs

GSGF SMART GRID REPORT


Report provides insight and
analysis member countries
deploying smart grid. The report
identifies challenges which must
be addressed collaboratively:

7


GSGF REPORT FINDINGS



At the Global Level; smart grids have become

-
a powerful agent of environmental policy by enabling reliable
integration efficiency and cleaner sources of power

-
a part the economic growth and jobs agenda for many countries
looking for domestic employment and new export opportunities



The Business Case for smart grids is positive when factoring societal
benefits
such as environmental, energy security, and economic
development factors



The ratepayer is taking on the role previously held by the taxpayer in
paying
for environmental and energy security policy



There is a role for government and industry to convince consumers of the
environmental, security and economic benefits
-

a role that many utilities have
not traditionally been asked to perform


8


GSGF REPORT UPDATES



The Global Smart Grid Federation Report was designed to allow
for easy updates as new project information becomes available or
the GSGF membership grows. The Report will be updated during
the 1
st

Quarter of 2013 with information from GSGF Members:



Danish Intelligent Energy Alliance


India Smart Grid Forum


Israel Smart Energy Association


Norwegian Smartgrid Centre


Smart Grids Flanders


Taiwan


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GSGF WORKING GROUPS



To facilitate collaboration between the members, the
GSGF Board has the created three working groups.


Interoperability

-
The interoperability Work Group will focus on ensuring that products offered by different vendors will be
able to

interact with each other. The massive expansion needed in the smart grids market will be directly
related to continuous efforts aimed at ensuring that new and differentiating products and services can
operate in a multi
-
vendor and multi
-
operator environment.


Interfaces of Grid Users/ Focus on EV and Local Storage

-
This working group will focus on grid user interactions and interfaces with special emphasis on electrical vehicles
and small storage devices in residential and commercial buildings. The aim is to develop the necessary tools for
enabling the customer to make choices regarding prices and energy sourcing, to organize the retail market and to
introduce new services.


Connection of small generators

-
The third working group will deal with the connection of small generation and their integration in the overall
system. The aim is to overcome vendor specific approaches and to make the behavior transparent to the user,
the supplier and the grid operator. In that respect, grid codes as found in all synchronous systems can serve as a
framework of thinking.







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GSGF COLLABORATIVE PARTNERS



GSGF has established a number of collaborative
relationships with global energy organizations.


-
Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate (MEF)


-
Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM)


-
International Smart Grid Action Network (ISGAN)


-
International Energy Agency (IEA)


-
Global Green Growth Forum (3GF)


11

OVERVIEW


What is GSGF?



Smartgrids: a global agenda with many viewing
angles



A global perspective


13

DIFFERENT PLAYERS

14

14

EXAMPLES TO ILLUSTRATE


Smartgrid: many descriptions


Dangerous: we can get the impression that we are
working the same subject


80
-
20 rule holds


Reliability, security of supply always a key element


Sustainability, almost always (but may be the
political holy grail)


Market facilitation down to retail (including demand
flexibility): not always

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EXAMPLES


Australia: Retail and DSM


USA: a lot of IT involvement


Korea: full sized deployment


India: electricity for all

16

SMART GRID R&D ROADMAP
FOR AUSTRALIA

17

STEP 1: Identification of key R&D topics

http://smartgridaustralia.com.au/SGA/Documents/SGA_R&D.pdf

(2010)

SMART GRID R&D ROADMAP
FOR AUSTRALIA

STEP 2: Prioritisation of R&D topics by rating
relative impact, feasibility & urgency of need

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NATIONAL ELECTRIC DELIVERY
TECHNOLOGIES ROADMAP



GRID
2030


19

http://www.climatevision.gov/sectors/electricpower/pdfs/electric_vision.pdf

(2003)

SMART GRID R&D MULTI
-
YEAR
PROGRAM PLAN (2010
-
2014)


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http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/smart
-
grid
-
rd
-
multi
-
year
-
program
-
plan
-
2010
-
2014
-
september
-
2011
-
update

KOREA

S SMART

GRID ROADMAP

21

Roadmap implementation in


5 sectors


3 phases

http://www.smartgrid.or.kr/10eng4
-
1.php


KOREA

S SMART GRID
ROADMAP

22

ISGF ROADMAP FOR
INDIA

23

http://173.201.177.176/isgf/Download_files/Roadmap.pdf

OVERVIEW


What is GSGF?



Smartgrids: a global agenda with many viewing
angles



A global perspective


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EUROPEAN ACTORS


SET
-
plan


Accelerating development and deployment

of cost
-
effective
low carbon technologies


Industrial Initiative with large scale pilot projects


Themes:


Wind, Solar


Nuclear


CCS


Bio
-
energy


Green Cars


Fuel cells


Hydrogen


Smart Cities


Electricity Grids


Energy efficiency


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European
Industrial Initiative

Industry

European
Research Area

Financing

European
Energy
Research
Alliance

Research

European Institute
of Innovation &
Technology

Education

EIT KIC: THE KNOWLEDGE TRIANGLE

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Business creation

Education

Innovation

project

KIC InnoEnergy
-

Europe

27

SMARTGRIDS ETP STRATEGIC
RESEARCH AGENDA 2035

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http://www.smartgrids.eu/node/28


SMARTGRIDS ETP STRATEGIC
RESEARCH AGENDA 2035

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Research Area D
“Smart Electricity
D
istribution Systems”
Research Area T
“Smart Electricity
T
ransmission
Systems”
Research Area RC

Smart
R
etail and
C
onsumer Systems”
SmartGrids Research Area IS
«
I
ntegrated
truly sustainable, secure and economic
Electricity
S
ystems»
RA
T&D
Other
research
areas
contributing
to
the
SmartGrids SRA 2035:
European
Energy
Platforms
for
Wind, PV, CSP, CCS, Bio
-
Energy
,
Fuel Cells, Hydrogen,
SmartCities
EEGI
ROADMAP 2010
-
18 &
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN 2010
-
12


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http://www.smartgrids.eu/documents/EEGI/EEGI_Implementation_plan_May%2020
10.pdf


IRELAND SMART GRID ROADMAP
TO 2050



Building on work done by the IEA


Developed
in conjunction with a roadmap for wind energy
and electric vehicle deployment in Ireland


Some key findings


13 MIO tonnes of CO2 emission reduction by 2050


8 MIO tonnes derived directly from implementation of the smart grid


5 MIO tonnes derived from displacement of fossil fuels due to
electrification of transport and thermal loads, facilitated by the smart
grid


Overall annual electrical final energy demand >48000 GWh by
2050 (currently
±
33000 GWh); corresponding peak demand
of 9 GW


>88% to be supplied from renewable sources


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http://www.seai.ie/Publications/SEAI_Roadmaps/Smartgrid_Roadmap.pdf

SMART GRID ROADMAP TO 2050
(SEAI)

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SMART GRID UK

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PART 1: Integrated UK smart grid routemap out to 2020: delivering in the
near term to prepare for the future

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20100919181607/http:/www.ensg.gov.uk/assets/ensg_routemap_fin
al.pdf

(2010
-

ENSG =
Electricity Networks Strategy Group


chaired by DECC and
Ofgem)

SMART GRID ROUTEMAP

38

PART 2: Beyond the short term, a high
-
level routemap plotting out potential
activities and indicative timescales for action out to 2050

CONCLUSIONS


Learning from each other makes a lot of sense


Successes and failures are important


Local view is important, but laws of physics do
remain the same all over the globe


KPI

s are important, but threatening


If Edison had studied the KPI

s of replacing
petroleum or gas lightning by electricity, what
would have happened?

39

ENERGYVILLE BUILDING

40

ENERGYVILLE BUILDING

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