JISC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES

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Nov 3, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

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Project Plan



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JISC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES

PROJECT PLAN

Project

Project Acronym


Project ID


Project Title

Geospatial Interoperability Demonstrator Project

Start Date

1 Nov 2004

End Date

30 April 2004

Lead Institution

EDINA National Data Centre

Project Director

David

Medyckyj
-
Scott, EDINA

Project Manager &
contact details

James Reid
, EDINA

University of Edinburgh Data Library, Main Library Building, George
Square, Edinburgh EH8 9LJ

Tel: 0131 651
1383

Fax: 0131 650 3308

Partner Institutions

MIMAS,

Geomatics
UCL,
CCG
L
eeds,

NERC

Project Web URL


Programme Name (and
number)

TBD

Programme Manager

Rachel Bruce


Document

Document Title

Project Plan

Reporting Period


Author(s) & project role

James Reid

Date

28

Oct 2004

Filename


URL


Access

X Project and JISC inter
nal



General dissemination


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Overview of Project

1.
Background

The JISC has been actively investing in the development of innovative geospatial data services and
related tools and infrastructure to support its use for the past five years. (A working d
efinition of
geospatial data in this context is as follows; “data that have some form of spatial or geographic
reference that allows them to be located in two or three dimensional space”
.)
Some Geospatial Data
Services are now relatively well established,

for example,
UKBORDERS and
Digimap at EDINA and
Land
m
ap at MIMAS
.



The JISC 5 year strategy has as one of its goals the building of “an on
-
line information environment
providing secure and convenient access to a comprehensive collection of scholarly and

educational
material". An

Integrated

Information Environment (I
I
E) can be characterised as
“the set of network or
online services that support publishing and use of information and learning resources”
. It is
underpinned by a technical architecture speci
fying the set of standards and protocols to be used in
developing and delivering networked services to allow users to
discover
,
access
,
use

and
publish

resources as part of their learning and research activities (
http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/distributed
-
systems/
jisc
-
ie/arch/
). It is recognised that
interoperability

is of fundamental importance and that the
JISC I
I
E is a component of the national and global networked environment.


To date, there has been no formal geospatial interoperability study between the n
ational data centres,
or between the national data centres and users in institutions. This work is required as:




the economic benefits of interoperability and
Spatial Data Infrastructures (
SDI
)

are becoming
clearer and significant developments are underwa
y both nationally and internationally.



there is a need to understand how the UK academic sector can best exploit developments in the
standards underpinning these developments.



greater understanding is required of what is involved in supporting research and

education in this
important area in the future.


The benefits of interoperability have been recognised by the national data centres for several years
and open standards are an integral part of many services and projects. For example,
the new
JISC/OS lice
nce agreement
allows other JISC funded services access via
Open Geospatial
Consortium
interface specifications to O
rdnance
S
urvey

maps and

data hosted at EDINA
. Internally,
EDINA deploy a range of such standards based mechanisms to support service deliver
y.


2.
Aims and Objectives

The aims of the demonstrators, within the overall project, are:




to prove the feasibility of delivering geo
-
spatial data using Open

G
eospatial Consortium
(OGC)

standards based GIS web services;



to demonstrate ease of use and valu
e added
;




to build support and enthusiasm for further development
;




to stimulate and advance further thinking
;
and



to identify major hurdles in full development.



The pr
imary objective is to develop a

set of demonstrator applications
, based on use cases

produced
at the start of the project,

which:



promote interoperability between distributed data sources to maximise their combined value;



improve and enhance the communities experience of interacting with geospatial data; and



support the work of the Collec
tions Team in developing further use of geospatial data
resources already at the disposal of the community.


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3.
Overall Approach

In the broader
arena

of geospatial data delivery beyond the JISC IIE,
increasingly the term ‘Spatial
Data Infrastructure’ (SDI
) is being deployed as a conceptual focus around which to
organise strategic
development.
SDI
s

may be defined as
“the relevant base collection of technologies, policies and
institution
al
arrangements that facilitate the availability

of and access to spatia
l data”
1
.
Over th
e last
few years the concept
has gained increased currency in the

Geographic Information community to the
point where significant resources are being made available to establish SDIs at international, national
and regional levels.




The
re are many parallels between the concepts of SDIs and the JISC I
I
E. Both are concerned with
the need to be able to find, access and use digital resources. The shared and fundamental
requirement for interoperability means that both exploit the same base
set of wider IT standards.


Interoperability has two main aspects. Semantic interoperability refers to the ability to share and
understand information from multiple vendors in multiple formats. Cross platform interoperability
refers to the
ability to e
xchange
information on multiple systems
and platforms
.
Interoperability and
standards are very closely related. As is the case in the wider IT industry, standards can either evolve
through the widespread use of dominant vendors technology, or can be deve
loped via a consensual
process. The trend in the Geospatial industry, particularly in SDI

development is towards the latter,
most notably st
andards developed by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC,
www.opengeospatial
.org) and
International Organisation fo
r Standardisation
(ISO).


Some of the benefits of using
such
open standards are:




Increases the value of existing and future investments in Information Systems.



Allows portability of data.



Expands choices for vendor alternatives


no vendor lock
-
in.



Enab
les vertical industry segments to unify trading practices.



Decreases the long
-
term cost of ownership for applicable software investments.



Enables leverage of existing skill
-
sets, i.e., does not require proprietary training.



Provides a benchmark for softwar
e design.


The
OGC
has defined a framework for the implementation of standards based GIS web services
(
http://www.opengis.org/specs/
).
When
OGC

conformant interfaces
are
adopted

on a large scale any
client can

communicate with any
geo
-
spatial data
server as if they were in the same vendor family of
products.

In other words, there is a level of transparency attained which contrasts sharply with the
opacity found in heteroge
neous, vendor specific proprietary mec
hanisms that have for
merly

been the
bet noir of the geospatial (and indeed, the ICT) industry.


The demonstrator project being proposed here will utilise
OGC
geospatial standards within an SDI

microcosm
’, concentrating on the delivery and exploitation of
UK wide environmental and contextual
data.
This application domain has been selected because of the availability of suitable data sources
within the national data centres and the NERC Data Grid.


Interopera
bility will be demonstrated at two fundamental l
evels

through a series of clients
:


(i)

A
t

a
mapping
level. Map, satellite images, and DEM hill shaded images will be requested
from distributed map servers
operated by the national data centres and by the NERC Data
GRID
and displayed overlaid in a client run
/operated at an institution. The satellite images
would be made available in either true colour or false colour composites according to user
request.


(ii)

A
t a
data
level. Data will be requested from distributed feature servers

again operated by the
nationa
l data centres and by the NERC Data GRID

and be rendered in a client run/operated
at another institution. In addition users will be able to
generate

map
images
on one server and



1

Nerbert, D.D. (2000):
Developing Spatial Data Infrastructures: The SDI Cookbook.


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request the extraction and the download
of the
original data from another serv
er
. Formats will
be

pre
-
specified
and will be in
either compressed or non compressed form
.


The project will additionally explore areas in which the OGC interoperability standards are as yet
immature, specifically in the areas of:


Annotation :
-

U
sers
of
geospatial data
often need to summarize the essential content of an image,
highlight spatial patterns, label certain features, point out features of interest, or express similarities or
diffe
rences between maps and images. OGC defines possible ways for suc
h functionality to be
ach
i
e
ved

with the result stored and made accessible to others

and the project will investigate the
potential in these approaches
.


Security :
-

the project will investigate issues related to authentication of clients and
web
services
utilising OGC service mechanisms and
identify
.
In the context of web service operation within the
JISC
I
IE, the existence of existing authentication and authorisation mechanisms i.e. ATHENS, as well
as other access control mechanisms e.g.
Shibboleth

will h
ave to deliberated. Likewise consideration
will be given to
UK
-
funded work

under the general
Grid/e
-
Science banner as well
developments in the
area of web services security world wise.

It will not be possible within the context of this project to fully
inv
estigate geospatial digital rights management
.


4
.
Project Outputs

The project will deliver the following:




A range of OGC
based
web services

(W
eb
M
ap Services
,

W
eb
F
eature
S
ervices
,

W
eb
C
overage
S
ervices



see Section 8)
.



A

basic annotation
web service
.



A series of s
tandards
compliant client
s

to illustrate 3 use cases (drawn from teaching
research and general service delivery perspective)

capable of accessing and consuming web
services delivered via a distributed computing platform (the Internet), illustr
ating mapping and
data integration.



A report
on the utility and issues surrounding implementation of open standards for geospatial
data within the JISC I
I
E, including an assessment of security and access authorisation issues


5
. P
roject Outcomes

The projec
t will act as a proof of concept demonstration on the utility of both the deployment and
consumption aspects of interoperability standards. It will provide the touchstone by which the JISC
may gauge the benefits of geospatial interoperability and act as a
showcase for the benefits of
using
open standards in the UK

academic SDI.

The lessons learned and experiences gained will feed into
the proposed reengineering of the EDINA Digimap service to handle OS MasterMap data.


It is
also
hoped that the project wil
l lay the foundation for broader recognition of the concept of an SDI
for UK academia and that tangible long term outcomes will accrue as a result. Specifically, the
movement towards a discover, access, use and publish culture for geospatial dataset
s

withi
n UK
HE/FE. This will hopefully facilitate the more rapid diffusion of geospatial data and technologies within
the broader community and foster a wider recognition of the value of
the
geospatial resources that are
currently
locked within ‘information silos

inside
the JISC IIE.


6. Stakehol
der Analysis


Stakeholder

Interest / stake

Importance

JISC G
eospatial
W
orking
G
roup

High

High

J
IS
C I
I
E

High

High

JISC CRR

Medium

Medium

HE/FE GI
user
community

High

High

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OGC

Medium

Low

UK GI Community

High

Medium



7. Risk A
nalysis


Risk

Probability

(1
-
5)

Severity

(1
-
5)

Score

(P x S)

Action to Prevent/Manage Risk

Staffing

2

3

6

Secure by contract lock
-
in

Organisational

3

4

12

Project management structure

Technical

2

2

4

Diversity of servers/engineers

External s
uppliers

1

2

2

Limited reliance on (external to partners)

Legal

1

2

2

Avoid IPR and licensing by retention within HE/FE


8
. Standards

The key standards to be used are those based on the Open Geospatial Consortiums:


WMS

: A web map server (or a
WMS
) is a web application which provides portrayal of geographic
data which is stored on the server. This data can be stored in a variety of data formats but is served in
a limited number of image formats. T
his provides the useful ability to restrict access to data since only
a picture of the data is sent to the user and the high quality vector or raster data remains safe on the
server. This is in sharp contrast to a
Web Feature Server

(
WFS
) which returns the features of the data
as features.


WFS

:
The Web Feature Server (WFS)
standard
is an interface allowing requ
ests for geographical
features across the web being highly interoperable. It uses the XML
-
based GML for data exchange.


WCS
:

The Web Coverage Server (WCS) standard defines how to provide satellite data over the
internet. This differs from WMS as actual dat
a values are sent.


XIMA

: XML for Image and Map Annotations. This is not currently an OGC specification but is defined
in a discussion paper (01
-
019). A bye product of this project would be to create a second
implementation which would help progress to st
andardisation.


GML:
The Geography Markup Language (GML) is an XML encoding for the transport and storage of
geographic information, including both the geometry and properties of geographic features.

GML is an
adopted e
-
GIF standard (see below).


eGIF
:
e
-
Go
vernment Interoperability Framework (e
-
GIF): The e
-
GIF defines the minimum set of
technical policies and specifications governing information flows across government and the public
sector. The main objectives
are to maximise government effectiveness and t
he economic benefits of
government information resources by aligning with the global information revolution. Adherence to e
-
GIF is mandatory for government and public sector organisations.

Th
is project is aligned with eGIF,
t
he aim
of which
is to further

interoperability
.


Additionally, the project will adhere to the general guidelines and standards promulgated by JISC for
developments within the JISC IIE (
http://www.ukoln.
ac.uk/distributed
-
systems/jisc
-
ie/arch/standards/
).


9
. Technical Development

The project will use Rapid Application Development (RAD) techniques.
The objective is to rapidly
deliver a proof
-
of
-
concept Web Services platform and demonstrator applications.
RAD techniques

have been used by consortia partners previously to rapidly deploy clients using interoperable
components. The nature of the standards listed in Section 8 means that RAD is both suitable and
practical, allowing for iterative design and effici
ent reuse without the lead times associated with other
development paradigms.

Our technical objectives are to prove existing technology, such as OGC Web
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Map Server and OGC Web Feature Servers, rather than to develop new technology.

While each
partner will
be responsible for their specific deliverables, the management infrastructure of the project
will ensure that RAD remains the key to ensuring that deliverables are delivered on time and to
specification.


1
0
.
Intellectual Property

Rights

For the avoidance
of doubt, all background information and know
-
how used in connection with the
Deliverables shall remain the property of the Party introducing the same.


Any Results or materials created and or used for the deliverables and all rights therein shall be
owned
, in the first instance, by the party creating those Results. In the event that any Results are
jointly created the parties shall have joint ownership of those results.
The project will attempt to
ensure that all deliverables are clearly marked identifying

ownership of the intellectual property in
them


Each consortia member
will

grant to the other(s) a non
-
exclusive free licence to use the deliverables,
including the software tools, for the purposes of carrying out the Project and for teaching and research

purposes during the Project and after the end of the Project. The Parties have no obligation or
liabilities to maintain or support the deliverables beyond the timescales agreed with JISC.


Project Resources

1
1
.
Project Partners

The project partners are:


EDINA, University of Edinburgh

Consortia Leader and Project
management,

OGC web service
provider


David
Medyckyj
-
Scott


MIMAS, University of
Manchester

OGC web service provider


Kamie Kitmitto

Centre for Computational
Geography, University of Leeds

Prim
ary developer, annotation
tool


Ian Turton

Dept. Geomatic Engineering,
University College London

Use case, client development
and
Evaluation


Jeremy Morley

NERC

OGC web service provider

Andrew Wolff



EDINA is the lead site for the project. EDINA will p
rovide technical and management input to this
project.
The Consortia Agreement will be delivered within 8 weeks of project inception.


EDINA

Designated a JISC National Data Centre in 1995, Edinburgh University Data Library launched the
EDINA national servi
ce in January 1996. EDINA is now a successful National Data Centre playing
its part to support the emerging electronic library for higher and further education, offering relevant
and reliable data services to staff and students in an increasingly wide ran
ge of disciplines. The
Geoservices team at EDINA have substantial and proven experience in delivering web based
geodata delivery systems (e.g. the Digimap and UKBORDERS services) and in working with
interoperability standards (EDINA have been an associate

member of the OGC since 1999),
contributing to national initiatives such as emerging spatial metadata standards for the UK and
developing leading edge geo
-
enabling technologies for use with the academic SDI.


MIMAS is a JISC national data centre since 19
93. A spatial data service has been available since its
inception. MIMAS has been involved in many initiatives to provide mapping on the web before this
was popular through the JISC supported KINDS project. In 1999 MIMAS started and delivered the
JISC LAND
MAP project which produced a quantum shift in the provision of satellite data to UK
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academia. Almost all of the Landmap project data is available through web download. Developing
OGC standard services are a crucial and integral part of the service developm
ent and maintenance.


The Centre for Computational Geography (CCG)


CCG
is a research centre at the University of Leeds, with a specific interest in geographic software
development. The GeoTools open source java GIS library was initially developed by the

CCG and
they continue to provide development to the project. The CCG has also been closely involved in the
development of OGC standards. The CCG were partners in the development of the interoperability
tests the OGC uses to test if web servers are complia
nt. Dr Ian Turton is the director of the centre and
has over ten years of academic software development experience.


Dept. Geomatic Engineering, UCL, is active in developing the use of OGC standards for
interoperability in GI services on the Internet. Rec
ent projects include working with Reuters
Foundation on their AlertNet service to humanitarian aid NGOs to create a prototype web mapping
service (now incorporated within the live AlertNet site


www.alertnet.org
) u
sing OGC standards to
allow additional data feeds into the service. Currently the Department are nearing the end of a first
phase of funding from the British National Space Centre (BNSC) to implement a web mapping server
supporting OGC WMS and WCS standard
s for web mapping and on
-
the
-
fly data access. This service,
ICEDS (the Integrated CEOS European Data Server) is part of plans within the Committee for Earth
Observing Satellites (CEOS) to promote the use of OGC services within its members (space agencies
a
nd others). Hence the ICEDS project will not only have set up the server but the server is based
around open access software solutions and full documentation and software scripts will be made
available to allow other CEOS members to replicate and extend th
e services. UCL is an Academic
Member of the Open Geospatial Consortium.


NERC DG


The NERC DataGrid project aims to provide secure, integrated, uniform access to a wide range of
environmental data across the UK and internationally using Grid and web servi
ce technologies.
Domain standards (OGC and ISO TC211) form a crucial part of the architecture, and NDG has
developed a standards
-
based data model and XML markup (Climate Science Modelling Language);
OGC web service interfaces to NDG data will also be provi
ded. NDG is involved in the EU MarineXML
project. The NDG will be represented on the project by the Council for the Central Labor
atory of the
Research Councils
(CCLRC) e
-
Science Centre. The e
-
Science Centre has around 50 staff working on
a very large numbe
r of Grid projects across the UK. It is at the forefront of developments in Grid and
web services, including security.

12
. Project Management


EDINA

will act as the lead partner for the purposes of project administration and finance. Overall,
responsibilit
y for the project will rest with senior staff at EDINA.

The project will be co
-
ordinated by a
Project Director, Dr David Medyckyj
-
Scott and Project Mana
ger (0.3 FTE), Mr Chris Higgins (TBC),

based at EDINA.


The project consortium will be divided into mana
gement and technical teams and have a meetings
and communications strategy. The former shall meet at least once a month, the latter at least two
-
weekly with a full project meeting mid
-
term. To limit the T&S outlay, all communications (unless
exceptional ci
rcumstances demand otherwise), will be co
nducted virtually by video/tele
conferencing.
Day
-
to
-
day communications amongst project members (both management and technical) shall be
conducted by email and phone.


Where problems arise, these will be dealt with i
n the first instance at each site. If a problem persists,
this should be reported to the Project Manager and the Project Director. If the problem cannot be
resolved within the project, it will be referred to the JISC Office.


The Project Team will comprise
:


Site

Personnel

Role

Contact

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EDINA

David Medyckyj
-
Scott

Project Director

D.Medyckyj
-
Scott@ed.ac.uk


Chris Higgins

Project Manager

chris.higgins@ed.ac.uk


Andrew Robson

Senior Software Engineer

andrew.robson@ed.ac.uk


James Reid

Technical Advisor

Jame
s.Reid@ed.ac.uk





MIMAS

Kamie Kitmitto

Project Manager

k.kitmitto@manchester.ac.uk



Software Engineer






CCG

Ian Turton

Senior Software Engineer

Ian.Turton
@geog.leeds.ac.uk


A Nelson

Programmer






UCL

Jeremy Morley

Project Manager

jmorley@ge
.ucl.ac.uk


Nuno Gil

Research Associate

ngil@ge.ucl.ac.uk





NERC

Andrew Wolff

Technical liaison

A.Woolf@rl.ac.uk






13
.
Programme Support


Not known at this time


14
.
Budget


See

Appendix A.



Detailed
Project
Planning

15
.
Workp
ackages


See Append
ix 2.


1
6
.
Evaluation Plan

The evaluation for the project will be predominantly one with a technical focus, concentrating on
evaluating how interoperable geospatial approaches can enhance the delivery and relevance of
geospatial data within the context of
research and teaching in the JISC IIE. Some stakeholder
evaluation will be conducted using standard instruments such as questionnaires, email feedback and
interview (elements of this are intrinsic to WP2).


Timing

Factor to Evaluate

Questions to Address

Me
thod(s)

Measure of Success


Interoperability

What benefits to JISC
IIE?


Benefit to user
community








How
easy

to implement
?

client
development


Consultation
with
stakeholders
through
demonstrations
and
presentations



Web
service
Usabilit
y



Positive response
from stakeholders








Service robustness

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development


Security

How to implement web
services security?

Investigative
anal
y
sis/desk
report

Description of issues


Overall advantages
of interoperable
services

What benefits do web
services offer
?

Client
development

Ability to meet project
aims and objectives
within timescale


17
.
Quality Assurance Plan

The involvement of a diverse range of stakeholders will provide an important mechanism for the
quality assurance. Quality assurance will be enhan
ced by drawing on the expertise of the GWG.


Timing

Compliance With

QA Method(s)

Evidence of Compliance


Fitness for purpose

Stakeholder feedback

Ability to demonstrate
interoperable data/mapping


Best practice for processes

RAD/iterative testing

Working

clients


Adherence to specifications

RAD/iterative testing

Working clients


Adherence to standards

OGC conformance

Pass OGC test suite


Accessibility legislation


Basic validation suites






18
.
Dissemination Plan

To ensure that the project reaches
the widest possible audience of potential users a range of
dissemination strategies will be employed throughout the lifetime of the project. A project web site and
JISCmail list will be established and promotional materials will be prepared. News about the

project
will be disseminated to mailing lists, newsletters etc. EDINA and MIMAS will also use their existing
communication networks and channels to alert potential users of the
demonstrator’s

existence and to
elicit feedback.


Timing

Dissemination Activi
ty

Audience

Purpose

Key Message


Web site/mailing lists

JISC/GI
community

To promote
understanding of
interoperability
issues and
projects aims and
deliverables

What is
interoperability
and what does it
offer?


Conferences/workshops

HE/FE audience

To hig
hlight the
results and
outputs of the
project

Promotion of
geospatial web
services within
JISC IIE


Engagem
en
t beyond
HE/FE

Wider GI
community/OGC

To showcase
JISC
interoperability
and SDI
framework

The foundation of
an academic SDI


19
.
Exit
/Sustainabil
ity

Plan

Even though this is a technically focused project, the reason for doing it is to have the capability to
deliver operational Web Services in the future.
It is anticipated that the demonstrator applications will
persist independently post
-
project cl
osure although, by their nature, they are dependent on the
existence of 3
rd

party web services. Where these are within the purview of JISC, it would be
anticipated that their longevity could be better assured and that an endorsement/commitment from
JISC to

support the ongoing delivery of geospatial data via interoperability methods would be a
desirable conclusion (contingent of course on successful outcomes of the pilot demonstrators).


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Project Outputs

Ac
tion

for Take
-
up & Embedding

Acti
on

for
Exit

OGC
web services

Available for consumption subject to
security and data IPR issues
for trial
period

Available for
consumption

subject to site specific resource
constraints

of service provider

Reports

Generally available for wider
dissemination

Archived and av
ailable for
access via web site
(s)

Client applications

Persists as demonstrators of
geospatial
interoperability

Available for 6
th

month period
post project



L
ong
-
term project outputs:


Project Outputs

Why Sustainable

Scenarios for Taking
Forward

Issues

to Address

OGC web services

Offers bedrock for
geospatial
interoperability within
JISC IIE
. Follows
industry approved
consortia agreed
approaches

Further JISC funded
projects

/ ongoing support

Security/ authorisation /
scalability

/ update







Project Acronym



Project Plan



Version



Date

Page
11

of
14

Appen
dix B.
Workpackages



Project start date:


01.11.2004

Project completion date:
30.0
4
.2005

Duration:


06

months




Workpackage and activity

Earliest Start
date

Latest completion
date

Outputs

(clearly indicate
de
liverables & reports in
bold)

Milestone

YEAR 1





WORKPACKAGE 1:
Project
Management


Lead: EDINA


Partners:


Objective
: Smooth
running of project and
ensuring deliverables and
milestones met






1.

Project plan

01 Nov 2004

30 Apr 2005

Project plan


2.

Con
sortia agreement

01 Nov 2004

01 Jan 2005

Consortia agreement

X

3.

Minutes of meetings

01 Nov 2004

30 Apr 2005

Minutes


4.

Interim report

01 Feb 2005



X

5.

Closing report

30 Apr 2005


Final Report

X

6.











WORKPACKAGE 2: Use




WORKPACKAGES

Month

1

2

3

4

5

6









1:
Project Management

Nov

x

x

x

x

x

x

2: Use Cases

Nov

x






3: Implement OGC services

Nov

x

x

x

x

x

x

4: Develop
Annotation tool


Nov

x

x

x

x

x


5: Client development

Jan



x

x

x

x

6: Evaluation and reporting

(including security aspects)

Mar





x

x

Project Acronym



Project Plan



Version



Date

Page
12

of
14

Cases


Lead: UCL


Partners: AL
L


Objective
: To delineate
the functionality and web
services requirements of
the client demonstrators


7.

Review user
requirements

01 Nov 2004

01 Dec 2004



8.

Review client
functionality

01 Nov 2004

01 Dec 2004



9.

Identify web service
requirements

includ
ing data sources

01 Nov 2004

01 Dec 2004



10.

Agree on client
specification

01 Nov 2004

01 Dec 2004

Client specifications

X






WORKPACKAGE 3:
Implement OGC services


Lead: EDINA/MIMAS


Partners: NERC DG, UCL


Objective
: To establish OGC
conformant web s
ervices
based on published standards

for at leat WMS and WFS
standards and investigate
WCS






11.

EDINA implementation
and conformance
testing

01
Nov

2004

01 Mar 2005

OGC conformant web
services


Define Capabilities scope from
WP2

01 Nov 2004

15 Dec 2005



Implement Capabilities for
range of WMS (as required
from WP2)

01 Nov 2004

01 Feb 2005



Implement Capabilities for
WFS (as required from WP2)

01 Nov 2004

01 Feb 2005



Test OGC conformance

01 Jan 2005

01 Mar 2005



Add vendor specific
enhancements as

per WP2
requirements

01 Jan 2005

01 Apr 2005



Final Testing/bug fixing

01 Mar 2005

30 Apr 2005








12.

MIMAS implementation
and conformance
testing
(All MIMAS work Packages
will be limited to a small subset of
the total images and data available.
01 Nov 2004

30 Apr 2005

OGC conformant web
services


Project Acronym



Project Plan



Version



Date

Page
13

of
14

This
subset will be defined in WP2.)

Specify and Create Metadata
for image files specified in
WP2

01 Nov 2004

15 Dec 2005

Metadata & ArcXML files


Image Processing,
enhancement and Image
Compression as per
requirements of WP 2 PLUS
Meta data creation of new
output

01 Nov 2004

01 Feb 2005

Processed and
compressed Images for
application areas


Image Web Server Installation,
web pages development and
deployment

01Nov 2004

01 May 2005

OGC Conformant WMS
serv
ices

V

Install ARCIMS/ARCSDE and
develop a Metadata service
This section is dependent on
Meta Data creation

01 Dec 2004

30 Apr 2005

Meta data service


Investigate OGC conformant
WCS Software development of
pages Reliant on Open Source
software

01 Dec 2
004

30 Apr 2005

Hope to deliver OGC
Conformant WCS Most
Probably report
investigations and
recommendations for a
further work. Time and
resources too limited for
any commitment. Work
will be Limited in scope
and delivery







WORKPACKAGE 4:
Develop ann
otation
tool


Lead: CCG


Partners:


Objective
: To develop a web
service supporting
annotation facilities






13.

Specification review

01 Nov 2004

01 Dec 2004



14.

Develop functional
specification of AWS
based on 13, and WP2.

01 Dec 2004

01 Jan 2005

Functiona
l Specification

X

15.

Development

01 Jan 2005

01 Mar 2005



16.

Integration Testing
and review

01 Mar 2004

01 Apr 2005

Annotation web service

X

17.

Input into evaluation
report (WP6)

01 Apr 2005

30 Apr 2005








WORKPACKAGE 5: Client
development


Lead:
UCL





Project Acronym



Project Plan



Version



Date

Page
14

of
14


Par
tners:

EDINA, MIMAS


Objective
:


18.

Development of
Clients (based on
outputs of WP2)

01 Jan 2005

30 Apr 2005

Client applications

X

19.

Coordinate WP2
requirements with
WP3 and WP4
progress

01 Jan 2005

01 Feb 2005



20.

Mock
-
up clients based
on WP2 functional
ity

10 Jan 2005

24 Jan 2005

Mock
-
ups

X

21.

Iteratively build clients
with outputs from WP3
& WP4 as they
become available for
consumption

24 Jan 2005

01 Apr 2005



22.

Stakeholder
testing/feedback

Mar 2005

Mar 2005

User feedback

X

23.

Final testing and
release

01 A
pr 2005

30 Apr 2005

Final
Clients

X

WORKPACKAGE 6:
Evaluation and reporting


Lead: EDINA


Partners: ALL


Objective
: To provide
evaluative feedback on
lessons from the project and
report on investigative
aspects






24.

Review
security/authorisation
options

01 Mar 2005




25.

Summarise
experiences and
make
recommendations


30 Apr 2005

Evaluation report


X