Syllabus 3D Animation in Java - Fall 2010

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Jun 7, 2012 (5 years and 2 months ago)

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Center for Talent Development

Northwestern University

Course Syllabus


Fall 2010 Gifted Learning Links


Course Title:
3D Animation in Java


Session Date:
Rolling Enrollment, 2010
-
2011 school year


Course Description:

Students in this course will learn ho
w to use graphics and programming techniques to create new and
complex entertaining games. From simple but fast full
-
action games to immersive 3D games, students
will build upon their existing programming skills while comprehensively exploring the affordan
ces and
constraints of the Java 3D library. We will devote the first five weeks to creating 2
-
dimensional game
projects using the Greenfoot IDE, then move on to Java 3D as we model 3D shapes and environments,
create 3D animated sprites, and develop a compl
ete game.

Essential Questions
:

a.

What is it about the “3D” perspective that some players find so engaging?

b.

What general design principles are common to both 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional games?

c.

What 3D design principles are especially distinctive?

d.

What
game genres are best expressed in 3D versus 2D, and vice versa?


Outcomes
:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will:



Know how to use logic to build a program utilizing drag and drop tools



Understand the different types of video games and
the important key concepts that make others
want to play a game



Develop characters for games and program them to function as designed



Learn key elements of computer programming through logical processes



Be able to write a technical document with instructi
ons how to play the game they designed and
developed


Resources and Materials:

Davison, Andrew. Killer Game Programming in Java. (Required.)


Kolling, Michael. Introduction to Programming with Greenfoot. (Suggested.)


Coursepack to be provided by the instr
uctor.


Students will be required to download the free Greenfoot application which is available at
www.greenfoot.org. Students will also need to install the Java Development Kit (JDK) and the
Netbeans IDE from the Oracle Sun site:
http://www.oracle.com/te
chnetwork/java/javase/downloads/


Schedule:


Date(s)

Topic(s)

Activities

Assignments and/or
Assessment

Week 1

Introduction to
classmates

Post to discussion board


Pre
-
assessment conference
with instructor.

Download and install Greenfoot
application.


R
ead Preface and Chapter 1 of




“Introduction to Programming with
Greenfoot.”


Download and become familiar
with the Greenfoot Programmer's
Manual (available from the
Greenfoot site).

Week 2

Getting familiar with
Greenfoot


Classes and Objects


Conditional
e
xpressions

Little Crab Game



Read Chapter 2
-
4, Interlude 1 of
“Introduction to Programming with
Greenfoot.”


Complete Little Crab game.

Week 3

Image processing

Optional project:

Breakout (aka Bricks) or
Pong

Read handouts provided by
instructor.


Cre
ate intro screen, background,
sprites, sounds.

Week 4

Using variables to
manage scoring, health
and lives


Randomness


Sound effects



Complete optional Pong or
Breakout project

Read handouts provided by
instructor.



Week 5

Basic animation


Inventory ma
nagement
(pickups)


Jumping and gravity

2D animation project.





Read handouts provided by
instructor.



Complete animation project.

Week 6

Standard Java as a
game development
language


Framing and animation

Install Netbeans

Read Preface and Chapters 1
-
2 of
“Killer Gaming Programming in
Java.”



Week 7

Framing and animation
(continued)

Netbeans introduction: we'll
create a simple program
within the Netbeans
environment

Same as Week 6


Implement the animation loop
described in Chapter 2

Week 8

WormChas
e: Creating
a complete simulation
using standard Java.

Create WormChase
application

Chapters 3
-
4:



Worms in Windows and Applets”


Full Screen Worms”

Week 9

WormChase
(continued)

Complete WormChase

Chapters 3
-
4 (cont'd)

Week 10

Advanced Image
Processing

We'll return to image
processing and look at strip
images (aka tile sheets),
image effects and image
sequencing

Chapters 5
-
6 (selections only):



An Introduction to Java Imaging”


Image Loading, Visual Effects,
and Animation”

Week 11

Isometrics

We'll cre
ate a basic isometric
game

AlienTiles

and
examine how to model an
isometric game world,
Read Chapter 13: “An Isometric
Tile Game.”



position sprites upon
isometric tiles, and control
sprite interaction.

Week 12

Intro to the Java 3D
library

We'll paint
3D objects,
experiment with lighting, and
load and edit external 3D
models.

Read Chapters 14
-
16:



Introducing Java 3D”


A 3D Checkerboard”


Loading External Models”

Week 13

3D sprites and
animation

We'll create a 3D sprite class
that can navigate its
env
ironment. We'll also create
a viewer class that will allow
the player to see the
environment through the
perspective of the sprite.

Chapters 18
-
19 (and optionally
Chapter 20)



3D Sprites”


Animated 3D Sprites”


An Articulated, Moveable Figure”

Week 14

3D
sprites and
animation (cont'd)

Same as Week 13

Same as Week 13

Week 15

Particle systems

We create a particle system
for rendering explosion or
snowfall effects.

Read Chapter 21: “Particle
Systems.”

Week 16

Projectiles (aka
shooting)

We'll examine the p
hysics of
shooting and create a simple
FPS that uses a robot target.

Chapters 23
-
24:



Shooting a Gun”


A First Person Shooter”

Week 17

3D Maze

We'll enhance the FPS started
in Week 16 by creating a
maze environment consisting
of walls and passageways
for
the player to navigate.

Chapter 25: “A 3d Maze”


Complete shooting project from
week 16.

Week 18

Wrap and Overview

We'll review each of the
central concepts and strategies
explored during our course,
and also look at additional
topics and advanced
tec
hniques not covered within
the scope of the class.

Complete mapping of maze
environment discussed in week 17.


Instructor Biography
:


Brian Myers has a BS from Northwestern University and an MLIS from the University of Illinois,
Champaign
-
Urbana. He dir
ects Game Maker Academy, an out
-
of
-
school educational nonprofit program
for youth and teens, and has taught teen
-
oriented media and game design classes at various institutions
around Chicago’s North Shore. He has taught at CTD for four years, offering clas
ses in digital media and
game development, dynamic web design and Java programming. He speaks and writes frequently about
the importance of promoting digital design activities as a strategy for nurturing essential 21
st
century
literacy skills. His Game Ma
ker Academy program was the recipient of a 2008 American Library
Association Presidential Citation.


Contact Information:


Phone:
xxx
-
xxx
-
xxxx

Email:
xxx@xxx.xxx


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-
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-
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