Course Syllabus - IST 311 Object-Oriented Design and Software ...

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Course Syllabus - IST 311 Object-Oriented
Design and Software Applications
General Course Information
Department
IST
Number
311
Title
Object-Oriented Design and Software Applications
Credits
3
Description
IST 311 will be among the courses making up the System
Development Option in the Baccalaureate degree in Information
Sciences and Technology program and would normally be taken
in the 5th or 6th semester. It is the first course in the Option
sequence. The course is intended to provide students with
background in object-oriented design and programming.
Students will learn basic object concepts and develop skills to
implement programs utilizing object tools. To prepare for such a
work environment, students will learn to work together to design,
implement and test projects. IST 311 would normally be taken in
the 5th or 6th semester. Prerequisite(s): CMPSC 101 or CMBD
204, IST 240.
CSE 120, Intermediate Programming, handles some topics
contained in IST 311, but the focus of CSE 120 is not on object-
oriented design. Rather a major portion of its content is on top-
down programming. CSE 120 includes numerical methods and
algorithm analysis, areas not included in IST 311. IST 311 will
introduce students to team-based projects, as well as design
principles and object concepts. Student performance will be
evaluated by means of assignments, examinations, and team-
based projects.
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Course Syllabus - IST 311 Object-Oriented
Design and Software Applications
Prerequisite
CMPSC 101 or CMPBD 204, IST 240. If you have not met the
prerequisites you must meet with me to discuss an exception to
the requirements. You should meet with me prior to the second
class meeting to determine if you have the background
necessary to do well in this class. It would be useful if you have
an extract of your transcript or other documentation showing
your qualifications and background. Exceptions to the
prerequisite requirements will be made only if your background
or education has given you the proper foundation for this class.
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to apply
system development principles using an object-oriented
language, show how object-oriented techniques increase
productivity of complex systems and begin the development of
team skills when programming complex systems.
IST 311 will be offered every semester at University Park. At
every other campus location where the Baccalaureate degree
program is offered, the course will be offered 1-2 times annually
depending on demand. Student enrollment at University Park will
begin at approximately 50-75 in the first year and grow to 200
over a 3-4 year time period. At other locations, enrollment should
range from 25-50 annually.
Objectives
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to apply
system development principles using an object-oriented
language, show how object-oriented techniques increase
productivity of complex systems and begin the development of
team skills when programming complex systems.
Instructor Information
Primary Instructor
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Course Syllabus - IST 311 Object-Oriented
Design and Software Applications
William H. Bowers
Office
Franco 119
Phone Number
(610) 396-6276
Fax
(610) 396-6026
Email
whb108@nospam.psu.edu
Text Message
whbowers@nospam.sprintpcs.com
Home Page
http://www.bk.psu.edu/faculty/bowers
AIM:
psuwhb108
MSN Messenger:
whbowers@nospam.psu.edu
(Please use a PSU address and
include the course in the subject)
Meeting Time and Place
Section Number
001
Campus
Berks
Location
Luerssen 142
Days and Times
Monday: 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
Wednesday: 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
Friday: 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
Office Hours:
Course Materials
ISBN
0-13-147434-0
Title
Java, Java, Java, Object-Oriented Problem Solving
Edition
3d
Author
Morelli Ralph, Walde Ralph
Required
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Course Syllabus - IST 311 Object-Oriented
Design and Software Applications
Website
http://vig.prenhall.com/catalog/academic/product/0,1144,0
131474340,00.html
Publisher
Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ
ISBN
0-596-00773-6
Title
Java in a Nutshell
Edition
5th
Author
David Flanagan
Website
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/javanut5/index.html
Publisher
O'Reilly: Cambridge, MA
Optional
ISBN
0-13-239552-5
Title
NetBeans™ IDE Field Guide: Developing Desktop, Web,
Enterprise, and Mobile Applications
Edition
2d
Author
Website
http://vig.prenhall.com/catalog/academic/product/0,1144,0
132395525,00.html
Publisher
Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ
Online Resources
http://www.javalobby.org/
Using NetBeans IDE 5.5
Sun's Java Tutorial
NetBeans IDE 5.5 Quick Start Guide
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Course Syllabus - IST 311 Object-Oriented
Design and Software Applications
Class Schedule
Week 1
Monday, August 27, 2007
Topic Reading Handouts
Coding
Conventions
Appendix A
Appendix A
Course Intro,
Computers,
Objects and
Java
Chapter 0
Chapter 0
Week 2
Monday, September 03, 2007
Topic Reading Handouts
Java Program
Design and
Development
Chapter 1
Chapter 1
Assignments
Chapter 1 Lab (FirstApplet)
www.java.net
www.java.com
Programming Assignment Grading Standards
GUI Building in NetBeans 5.5
Inform IT's Java Guide
Sun's Java Site
FAQ's for Specific Programming Languages
Java Reference Guide
Java SE 6.0 Standard API
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Course Syllabus - IST 311 Object-Oriented
Design and Software Applications
Week 3
Monday, September 10, 2007
Topic Reading Handouts
Objects: Using,
Creating and
Defining
Chapter 2
Chapter 2
Assignments
Chapter 2 Lab (Circle)
Week 4
Monday, September 17, 2007
Topic Reading Handouts
Methods:
Communicating
with Objects
Chapter 3
Chapter 3
Assignments
Chapter 3 lab (CyberPet)
Week 5
Monday, September 24, 2007
Topic Reading Handouts
Input/Output:
Designing the
User Interface
Chapter 4
Chapter 4
Assignments
Chapter 1 Assignments (1.13,
14, 15, 16 & 17 - 5 points each;
1.18 - 10 points; 1.24 & 25 - 15
points each)
Chapter 4 Lab (CyberPet Applet)
Week 6
Monday, October 01, 2007
Topic Reading Handouts
Java Data and
Operators
Chapter 5
Chapter 5
Assignments
Chapter 5 Lab (Leap Year)
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Course Syllabus - IST 311 Object-Oriented
Design and Software Applications
Week 7
Monday, October 08, 2007
Topic Reading Handouts
Control
Structures
Chapter 6
Chapter 6
Assignments
Chapter 6 Lab (Prime Numbers)
Week 8
Monday, October 15, 2007
Topic Reading Handouts
Strings and
String
Processing
Chapter 7
Chapter 7
Week 9
Monday, October 22, 2007
Topic Reading Handouts
Inheritance and
Polymorphism
Chapter 8
Chapter 8
Assignments
Chapter 3 Assignments (3.9,
3.12 - 5 points each; 3.14 - 10
points; 3.14A, 3.16, 3.17, 3.20 -
15 points each)
Chapter 8 Lab (Class
Menagerie)
Week 10
Monday, October 29, 2007
Topic Reading Handouts
Arrays and
Array
Processing
Chapter 9
Chapter 9
Assignments
Chapter 6 Assignments - 6.12,
6.14 - 5 points each; 6.18,
6.20 - 10 points each; 6.21,
6.28, 6.30 - 15 points each
Chapter 9 Lab (Slideshow)
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Course Syllabus - IST 311 Object-Oriented
Design and Software Applications
Week 11
Monday, November 05, 2007
Topic Reading Handouts
Exceptions:
When Things
Go Wrong
Chapter 10
Chapter 10
Assignments
Chapter 10 Lab (Overhead)
Week 12
Monday, November 12, 2007
Topic Reading Handouts
Files, Streams
and I/O
Techniques
Chapter 11
Chapter 11
Assignments
Chapter 11 Lab (Text Edit)
Week 13
Monday, November 19, 2007
Topic Reading Handouts
Recursive
Problem
Solving, Towers
Of Hanoi
Chapter 12
Chapter 12
Assignments
Chapter 8 Assignments - 8.16,
8.17 - 5 points; 8.19, 8.26,
8.29 - 10 points; 8.20, 8.24 - 15
points. Note 8.19 XOR 8.20.
Week 14
Monday, November 26, 2007
Topic Reading Handouts
Graphical User
Interfaces
Chapter 13
Chapter 13
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Course Syllabus - IST 311 Object-Oriented
Design and Software Applications
Assignment Standards
General
Unless otherwise specified, assignments are due at the beginning of the first
class of the week. Late assignments will not be accepted unless I have approved
it before class. I will approve late assignments only in the case of unusual or
unforeseen circumstances beyond the student's control. All assignments will be
submitted in the appropriate ANGEL drop boxes with the files in a standard MS
Office readable format (Word, RTF or text). After the conclusion of the semester
I will burn copies of all assignment submissions to CD for permanent storage.
In accordance with Penn State Univeristy policy AD11
(http://guru.sp.psu.edu/policies/AD11.html), I may share assignment
submissions within or outside of the University. Unless I have your express,
previous permission, assignment submissions will have all identifying information
removed from them before release. Some of the reasons for sharing
assignments are to obtain a second opinion on grading or questions raised by
the submission; to illustrate the types of assignments in a class; to assess the
usefulness of the assignment in teaching the objectives of the course or in
meeting the educational goals of the department, division, college or university;
Week 15
Monday, December 03, 2007
Topic Reading Handouts
Data
Structures:
Lists, Stacks
and Queues
Chapter 16
Chapter 16
Assignments
Chapter 12 - 12.5, 12.6, 12.7,
12.8, 12.11, 12.18, 12.19,
12.22 - 5 points each; 12.24 -
20 points
Course Critique
Course Format
Classes will consist of a mix of lecture, participative discussion, demonstrations
and hands-on lab work. The proportions will vary according to the material at
hand.
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Course Syllabus - IST 311 Object-Oriented
Design and Software Applications
to demonstrate the educational content, goals or student capabilities to other
educational institutions or businesses.
Programming Assignments
Your source code should be neat with standard indenting; consistent naming
conventions; good descriptive procedure, function and program headers and lots
of white space. The easier it is to read your code, the easier it is to evaluate it. A
checklist delineating my grading standards will be attached as the first document
in hard copy program assignment submissions. Assignments submitted through
ANGEL or by email should be submitted as a single ZIP file that contains the
source code files, compiled files, any supporting files, such as HTML files,
databases, manifest files, flat files, resource files, etc. and screen shots of the
program's processes or output. Screen shots should be in the most compact
format possible, such as GIF or JPEG.
Source code that will not compile will not be evaluated and will result in no credit
for that assignment. Incomplete assignment submissions (for example, missing
compiled files, supporting files, screen prints or other files) will also be returned
without being evaluated and will receive no credit. If you are not sure as to the
requirements for a particular assignment, ask before you submit it.
Attendance
You are expected to attend all class sessions. This course will cover a great deal
of material and missing even one class will put you at a disadvantage. I recognize
that there may be job, family or other unavoidable conflicts with scheduled
classes. These will be dealt with on a case-by-case basis before the scheduled
class. If you have a conflict that cannot be avoided, please let me know as soon
as you are aware of it so that we may find a reasonable solution. Except in cases
of true last minute unavoidable conflicts, I will not excuse an absence after the
fact. Please make sure to let me know before the class, not afterwards.
If excessive absences become a problem on those days where there is no direct
penalty for missing class, such as group work or lab days, I reserve the right to
award “bonus points” for attendance or participation or through the use of
unannounced pop quizzes for those who are in class .
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Course Syllabus - IST 311 Object-Oriented
Design and Software Applications
Evaluation Methods
You will be evaluated on the basis of your individual assignments. Individual
assignments will be worth the point values listed on the assignment sheet. The
points for each deliverable are detailed in the project requirements. Lab
assignments will be completed during the scheduled lab sessions and will be
turned in at the end of that session. They will be worth 2 points each and will be
graded as 0 for not submitted, 1 for submitted but deficient and 2 points for a good
submission.
The overall course grade will be a simple percentage of your total points divided by
the total available points.
Grading
Letter Grade Points Minimum Percentage
Grading is in accordance with the University standards:
(http://www.psu.edu/ufs/policies/47-00.html#47-40)
A
4.00
93
A-
3.67
90
B+
3.33
87
B
3.00
83
B-
2.67
80
C+
2.33
77
C
2.00
70
D
1.00
60
F
0.00
0
While I am always willing to discuss grades, grade changes will not be considered
more than one week after an assignment has been returned. Deferred grades for
the semester will only be considered if made in a timely manner and if the basis
for the request is beyond the control of the student.
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Course Syllabus - IST 311 Object-Oriented
Design and Software Applications
Academic Integrity
University Policies and Rules 49-20: “Academic integrity is the pursuit of scholarly
activity in an open, honest and responsible manner. Academic integrity is a basic
guiding principle for all academic activity at Penn State, and all members of the
University community are expected to act in accordance with this principle.
Consistent with this expectation, the University's Code of Conduct states that all
students should act with personal integrity, respect other students' dignity, rights
and property, and help create and maintain an environment in which all can
succeed through the fruits of their efforts. Academic integrity includes a
commitment not to engage in or tolerate acts of falsification, misrepresentation or
deception. Such acts of dishonesty violate the fundamental ethical principles of
the University community and compromise the worth of work completed by others.
Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarizing,
fabricating of information or citations, facilitating acts of academic dishonesty by
others, having unauthorized possession of examinations, submitting work of
another person or work previously used without informing the instructor, or
tampering with the academic work of other students.”
In short, if you use someone else's work, either directly or indirectly, be sure to cite
the work and give appropriate credit. If you are unsure, check with me beforehand
and credit the source. Source code or written assignments that are so similar to
another's work as to raise questions will not be evaluated, both submissions will
receive grades of zero for that assignment and an Academic Integrity form will be
completed and sent to the Associate Dean for referral to the appropriate
administrative committees. In accordance with University policy, I can “. . . not
issue a grade solely based upon a belief that a student has violated academic
integrity. An instructor must instead follow the procedures provided for in AAPPM
G9.” (http://www.bklv.psu.edu/academic/academicintegrity). This means that if I
assess a grade penalty for a violation, I must file the official paperwork with the
University.
Blatant or repeated acts of academic dishonesty will be referred to the appropriate
administrative committees and you may receive a failing grade for the course due
to academic dishonesty.
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Course Syllabus - IST 311 Object-Oriented
Design and Software Applications
Accommodations for Persons with Disabilities
"It is the policy of the University not to discriminate against persons with disabilities
in its admission policies or its procedures or educational programs, services or
activities." (Student Guide to General University Policies and Rules 2001-2001,
http://www.sa.psu.edu/ja/PoliciesRules.pdf) Penn State welcomes students with
disabilities into the University's educational programs. It is my policy to provide any
reasonable accommodations necessary for a person with a disability to be
provided a level playing field and equal opportunities in my classroom. Please let
me know as early in the semester as possible of any requirements you may have
so I may provide those accommodations. Susan Anderson, Disability Services,
sma17@psu.edu, 610-396-6410, 153 Franco Building (Berks campus) is also
available to assist you or answer questions about disability related issues.
Modification of Course Policies
This syllabus will be modified and kept up to date. It is your responsibility to check
the online version frequently to insure that you have the latest information. All of
my syllabi are linked to my home page (http://www.bk.psu.edu/faculty/bowers).
The above schedule, policies and assignments in this course may be modified to
meet the specific requirements of individual course sections or by mutual
agreement between the students and myself.
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