Fluid Mechanics 2 ( ME 253 )

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Jul 18, 2012 (4 years and 11 months ago)

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Fluid Mechanics 2 (ME253)

Dr. Gasser E. Hassan

Fall 2011

Lecturer

Gasser Hassan



gasser_hassan@yahoo.com

Assistant
Prof. of Fluid
Mechanics in City
for Scientific Research and Technology
Applications


B.Sc. 2000
-

Mechanical Engineering Department, Alexandria University

M.Sc
.
2005
-

Mechanical Engineering Department, Alexandria University


Computational Study for Air Flow and Pollutants Dispersion in Street Canyons
-

CFD
study

PhD
.
2010


University of Leeds, UK

Computational
Fluid Dynamics in Industrial and Environmental applications



Research
Interests

Computational
Fluid Dynamics “CFD
” in Industrial and Environmental applications

Projects
:
Natural Gas Combustion Systems Technologies, Wind Turbine, pipelines, Air
flow in Urban
Environement
....



Text Book



Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics 5
th

Mechanics, Edition
Munson, Young,
Okiishi




Grading


Quizzes


Experimental and Practical Reports


Mid
-
Terms


Final


Oral Questions during Lectures and Tutorials


Course Contents


Fluid Flow Classifications


Lift and Drag


Boundary Layer


Potential Flow Theory


Governing Equations


Applications




Definitions



Mechanics:
The oldest physical science that deals
with both stationary and moving bodies under
the influence of forces.


Statics:
The branch of mechanics that deals with
bodies at rest.


Dynamics:
The branch that deals with bodies in
motion.


Fluid Mechanics:
The science that deals with the
behaviour of fluids at rest (
fluid statics
)or in
motion (
fluid dynamics
), and the interaction of
fluids with solids or other fluids at the boundaries.


Material

Solid state

Fluid state

Liquid

Gaseous


Solid
: The molecules in a solid are arranged in a pattern that is
repeated throughout.


Liquid
: In liquids molecules can rotate and translate freely.


Gas
: In the gas phase, the molecules are far apart from each other,
and molecular ordering is nonexistent.


The arrangement of atoms in different phases: (a) molecules are at
relatively fixed positions in a solid, (b) groups of molecules move
about each other in the liquid phase, and(c) individual molecules
move about at random in the gas phase.

What Is a Fluid?


Fluid: A substance in the liquid or gas phase. A solid can resist an
applied shear stress by deformation. A fluid deforms continuously
under the influence of a shear stress, no matter how small.


In solids, stress is proportional to strain, but in fluids, stress is
proportional to strain rate. When a constant shear force is applied,
a solid eventually stops deforming at some fixed strain angle,
whereas a fluid never stops deforming and approaches a constant
rate of strain.


Stress:

Force per unit area.


Normal stress
: The normal
component of a force acting
on a surface per unit area.


Shear stress:
The tangential
component of a force acting
on a surface per unit area.


Pressure:
The normal stress
in a fluid at rest.


Zero shear stress:
A fluid at
rest is at a state of zero shear
stress.


When the walls are removed
or a liquid container is tilted,
a shear develops as the liquid
moves to re
-
establish a
horizontal free surface.


The normal stress and shear stress at

the surface of a fluid element. For

fluids at rest, the shear stress is zero

and pressure is the only normal stress.



In a
liquid
, groups of molecules can move relative to each other, but
the volume remains relatively constant because of the strong
cohesive forces between the molecules. As a result, a liquid takes
the shape of the container it is in, and it forms a free surface in a
larger container in a gravitational field.


A
gas

expands until it encounters the walls of the container and fills
the entire available space. This is because the gas molecules are
widely spaced, and the cohesive forces between them are very
small. Unlike liquids, a gas in an open container cannot form a free
surface.

Unlike a liquid, a gas
does not form a

free surface, and it
expands to fill the

entire available space.

Fluid Mechanics

Fluid Statics

Fluid Dynamics

Hydrodynamic

Aerodynamic

Fluid Kinematics

Stationary or moving

with constant velocity

a = 0

Motion (velocities

or acceleration)


Relation between

velocities and

accelerations

with forces

Hydrostatic

Aerostatic

Hydraulics

Flow Applications


Internal Flows:
Pipelines


External Flows:


Objects are completely surrounded by the fluid and the flows
are termed external flows.



Examples include the flow of air around airplane,
automobiles, and Flow around Propellers, or the flow of water
around submarines and fish
.


Internal vs. External Flow



Internal flows are
dominated by the
influence of viscosity
throughout the flow
field


For external flows,
viscous effects are
limited to the
boundary layer and
wake.


Why the study of External flow is
important



Design of cars and trucks to decrease the fuel
consumption and improve the handling
characteristics.


Improve ships, whether they are surface
vessels (surrounded by air and water) or
submersible vessels.


Design of building


consider the various wind
effects


The historical trend of streamlining automobiles to reduce
their aerodynamic drag and increase their miles per gallon.

Investigation Approaches

Two approaches are used to obtain information
of external flows:


Experimental approaches: Flow Properties
Measurements


Theoretical approaches: Solving of Governing
Equations


Analytical: purely theoretical methods is limited
-

limited.


Numerical: Computational Fluid Dynamics {CFD}

Experimental Approaches

Conservation Equations



Conservation of Mass “Continuity Equation”
Equation


Conservation of Momentum “Momentum Equation”


Conservation of Energy “First Law of
Thermodynamics


Second Law of Thermodynamics


Conservation of Momentum

Newton’s Second Law:



External Forces =


Inertia Force


Body force weight”


Surface forces:

-

Normal force “Pressure”

-

Shear force “Viscous”

Theoretical Approaches


Euler’s Equation


Theoretical Approaches


N.S.E


No
-
slip condition



A fluid in direct contact with a
solid ``sticks'‘ to the surface due
to viscous effects


Responsible for generation of
wall shear stress , surface drag
and the development of the
boundary layer


The fluid property responsible
for the no
-
slip condition is
viscosity


Important boundary condition
in formulating any problem for
analytical and computational
fluid dynamics analysis

Flow Classification


Real (Viscous) or Ideal (Inviscid) Flow


Compressible or Incompressible Flow


Turbulent or Laminar Flow


Unsteady or Steady Flow


3, 2, or 1 dimensional Flow


Rotational or Iroratational Flow