"Teaching on the Edge: How Marquee

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Nov 24, 2013 (3 years and 6 months ago)

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University of Maryland

Robert M. Briber, Jordan A. Goodman, David J. Hawthorne,

Robert D. Hudson, Alan J. Kaufman, Wesley G. Lawson, Ann C. Smith,
Spencer Benson, and Donna B. Hamilton

University of Maryland, College Park, MD

"Teaching on the Edge: How Marquee
Courses Offer a Model for CORE Education"


University of Maryland

This is a note re planning ( 1 hour block )


intro slides


Jordan (5min)


3 courses (21min?)


Briber


Hawthorne


Lawson


Lessons learned (7 min?)


Kaufman


Hudson


Assessment /moving forward


Ann (3 min?)


Questions and Answers from Panel Moderated by
Briber. (20 minutes)


University of Maryland


National need for an understanding of
science, technology, engineering, and
math (STEM)


Cannot be addressed only by educating
future scientists


The problem is deeper, more systemic,
and solutions must extend to improved
education for
non
-
science
majors.

University of Maryland

University of Maryland


College Park MD


Flagship campus


Public, Research University


13 Colleges and Schools



25,857 Undergraduates


127 Undergraduate Major programs

University of Maryland

Call for Proposals from D. Hamilton,

Dean for Undergraduate Studies:

Signature program that:


Engages senior faculty


Creatively addresses the challenge


“Teach” the process of science


Elucidate how science addresses world problems


Satisfies General Education (CORE) expectations


Engages 100+ students


Has departmental and college support

University of Maryland

AOSC 200 Weather and Climate

BSCI 120 The Insects: Pollinators in Crisis

ENEE 132 Engineering Issues in Medicine

ENMA 150 The Materials of Civilization

GEOL 124 Biogenesis: Making a Habitable Planet

PHYS 105 Physics for Decision Makers:

The Global Energy Crisis


University of Maryland

Table 1:
Marquee Courses in Science and Technology
Courses include the first examples of Engineering courses target
ed to non
-
science
majors. All courses have filled to the number of seats offered.
60
Fall 2008
ENMA 150
60
Spring 2009
PHYS 105
60
Fall 2008
GEOL 124
40
Spring 2009
ENEE 132
120
Fall 2008
BSCI 120
180
Spring 2009
AOSC 200
Enrollment*
Semester*
Course
*Most recent semester offered and the associated course enrollme
nt
Table 1:
Marquee Courses in Science and Technology
Courses include the first examples of Engineering courses target
ed to non
-
science
majors. All courses have filled to the number of seats offered.
60
Fall 2008
ENMA 150
60
Spring 2009
PHYS 105
60
Fall 2008
GEOL 124
40
Spring 2009
ENEE 132
120
Fall 2008
BSCI 120
180
Spring 2009
AOSC 200
Enrollment*
Semester*
Course
*Most recent semester offered and the associated course enrollme
nt
University of Maryland

Course

Instructor

Rank and Affiliation

AOSC 200

Robert D. Hudson

Professor, Atmospheric & Oceanic Science

BSCI 120

David J. Hawthorne

Associate Professor, Entomology

ENEE 132

Wesley G. Lawson

Professor .& Assoc Chair, Electrical & Computer
Engineering

Romel Del Rosario Gomez,

Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering

ENMA 150

Robert M. Briber

Professor and Chair, Materials Science and
Engineering

GEOL 124

Alan J. Kaufman

Associate Professor, Geology

PHYS 105

William W. Dorland

Associate Professor, Physics, Director UM
Honors

Jordan A. Goodman

Professor, Physics

Daniel P. Lathrop

Professor of Physics and Director, Institute for
Research in Electronics & Applied Physics

Steven L.. Rolston

Professor & Associate. Chair, Physics

Marquee Faculty: Research Associate and Full Professors

Interdisciplinary group: 3 colleges, 6 disciplines

University of Maryland

The Marquee Faculty began meeting as a group in Spring 2007


Topics of discussion:


Best practices of teaching


Engaging students in process of science


Global issues and problems with no answers


Common attributes of successful marquee courses


How to market courses to students and advisors


Teaching assistants


Learning goals and assessment measures


Website
www.marqueecourses.umd.edu


Wiki for sharing best practices


Workshop w/ Jay Labov NRC

University of Maryland

Reinvention, Nov. 2008

At the completion of a Marquee Course in Science and
Technology students will be able to:


Ask good questions


Relate science to a personal situation


Find information using various sources and evaluate the veracity of the
information


Look at complex questions and identify the science in the question and
how it impacts and is impacted by political, social, economic, and ethical
dimensions


Critically evaluate science arguments


Determine what they know and what they do not know. Communicate
effectively

Marquee Course Learning Goals

University of Maryland

Reinvention, Nov. 2008

University of Maryland


ENMA 150 The Materials of
Civilization



Robert Briber

Department of Materials
Science and Engineering

University of Maryland

This is a course taught by the Materials Science and
Engineering Department in the A. James Clark School of
Engineering for non
-
science/engineering majors.

Prof. Robert M. Briber
, Chair MSE Dept.

“Those who dominate materials, dominate technology.”



-

Tadahiro Sekimoto, Former President of NEC

Advances in materials have defined many of the advances in human
civilization


The Stone Age

The Bronze Age

The Iron Age

Steel, Semiconductors, Nanotechnology, Nano
-
Bio Technology

ENMA 150

Materials of Civilization

University of Maryland

General Goals for the course

-
Enrollment of 60+ students


-
Meets science needs for CORE (General Education)
requirements at the University of Maryland


-
Interesting material suitable for a range of majors, including
non
-
science and non
-
engineering students, limited math
required for course


-
Provides both an historical and modern context for science
and technology


-
Keep class lively and interesting; discussion, recent news
stories, connection to movies and other media.

University of Maryland

Detailed Goals for the Course

-
Develop an understanding of science and technology (particularly
materials!) in the development of modern civilization


-
Develop critical thinking and writing skills with respect to technology (take
home lab exercises and final paper)


-
Understanding of technical research resources: Web of Science, Patent
Databases, etc.


-
Develop/improve skills with spreadsheet software (Excel) and graphing


-
Guest speakers to maintain interest and increase awareness


The Smithsonian
: science in conservation


UMD NanoCenter
: future of nanotechnology


FDA
: materials/technology in medical devices


Maryland Orthotics & Prosthetics Inc
.: technology in prosthetic
limbs

University of Maryland

Course Structure

-
Book:
The Substance of Civilization







by Stephen Sass

-
Additional Readings

A Short History of Metals
-

Alan Cramb

Sharper
-

The Secret Lives of Knives

-

Todd Oppenheimer

others…


-
Keep it interesting: examples of material failures

USS Schenectady 1943

Aloha Airlines Boeing 737
-
200 1988

Minnesota bridge collapse 2008

University of Maryland

Take Home Labs
-

Learn basics of technical writing through take home labs


-
Take home materials
-

perform experiments in dorm/home, make
measurements


-
Write up results with formal structure
-

Introduction, Experimental, Results,
Discussion, Conclusions
-

Tie in to ideas through patent database

Shape Memory Alloys:

metals that remember their shape, Ni
-
Ti alloy
paperclip that can be straightened out and will return to original shape with
heat from a hair dryer

Super Absorbent Polymers
: A polymer that will “instantly” absorb
100x its weight in water and then release the water with the
application of salt

Mechanical Properties of Materials (not take home)
: Demonstration of
research instrumentation to measure the mechanical properties of aluminum,
cast iron and polyethylene

University of Maryland

Shape Memory Alloy Take Home Lab


Metals that remember their shape, Ni
-
Ti alloy paperclip that can be straightened out
and will return to original shape with heat from a hair dryer


Simple experiment that can
done in a dorm room.



Students research the
phenomenon (gain
understanding of materials
phase transition)



Think of possible applications



Research the patent database

University of Maryland

Super Absorbent Polymer Take Home Lab


A polymer that will “instantly” absorb 100x its weight in water and then release the
water with the application of salt.


Simple experiment that can
done in a dorm room.



Students research the
phenomenon (gain
understanding of gels,
crosslinking, ion screening)



Think of possible applications
(hint: babies!)



Research the patent database

University of Maryland

Final Research Paper
-


Explore modern materials/technology through a
research paper on a modern materials topic.

List of suggested topics (or pick their own with permission)

-
The 2007 Nobel Prize in Physics was given to Albert Fert and Peter Gruenberg for
the discovery of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) which is considered one of the
first fruits of material property changes that occur at the nanoscale.


-
The discovery, properties manufacture and uses of polytetrafluoroethylene,
otherwise known as Teflon®.


-
The discovery, properties manufacture and uses of poly(paraphenylene
terephthalamide), otherwise known as Kevlar®.


-
The discovery, properties manufacture and uses of synthetic diamonds.


-
Silicon based materials for conversion of solar energy to electricity.


-

The discovery, properties manufacture and uses of carbon nanotubes.

University of Maryland

“Echoes” from this course

Potential courses

-


Our Water Planet
” (Civil Engineering)

-


Surviving Natural Disasters
” (Civil Engineering)

-


Solar Energy as a True Alternative
” (Chemical and Aerospace Engineering)

-


Introduction to Modern Engineering Technologies
” (Mechanical Engineering)

-


The History of Aeronautics
” (Aerospace Engineering)

-


Space Matters: Beyond our Planet
” (Aerospace Engineering)

-


Transportation Innovation: Planes, Trains, and Automobiles, and their Role
in the Advance of Science
” (Civil Engineering)

-
Personal growth as a faculty member through Marquee Faculty meetings;
exchange of ideas, more thought to the development of a course as holistic
unit.


-
Visibility within the College of Engineering has lead to the proposal of a
series of engineering courses for non
-
majors:
Beyond the Boundaries of
Engineering:
Engineering Courses to Build Technological Literacy
Throughout the University


University of Maryland

Reinvention, Nov. 2008

BSCI 120

The Insects: Pollinators in
Crisis



David Hawthorne

Department of Entomology

University of Maryland

Interesting Applications:


Insects and Plants

Insects and Human Disease

Insects and Crops

Pollination



Basic Content:

Survey of Arthropods

Insect Orders

Insect Morphology and Physiology


Intermediate Content:

Insect communication

Insect defenses

Social Insects

Ecological roles of insects

12
th

week


Traditional Disciplinary Material
-

“The Insects”

University of Maryland


Retention


Cross
-
context application


Relevance of science

With only one or two opportunities:

What would we want our students to get from
our Science courses?

University of Maryland

What if we care more about
understanding science than about
disciplinary content?

University of Maryland

We can more effectively “hook” students and help
retention by using an interesting and relevant context.

Interesting Applications

Basic Content

Intermediate Content

Lots of great topics in Insect Science!

University of Maryland

The Insects: Pollinators in Crisis


Interesting Application:

Pollination


Basic Content:

Survey of Arthropods,

Insect Orders,

Insect Morphology and Physiology


Intermediate Content:

Insect communication,

Insect defenses,

Social Insects,

Ecological roles of insects

University of Maryland

The Insects: Pollinators in Crisis


Interesting Application:

Pollination


University of Maryland

The Insects: Pollinators in Crisis


Interesting Application:

Pollination



How do I evaluate the stuff I see and
read? What do I believe?



What would I need to know to figure
something out? Where can I find that
information?



How do I present technical information
so that others understand me?


University of Maryland


Group projects



Peer
-
to
-
Peer instruction



In
-
class engagement


Clickers


1
-
minute papers


Group discussion / Individual
response

Active Learning

University of Maryland

Some things that I have learned:


1) Don’t try too many changes at once. Two major

changes (topic and group projects) were about all I could handle.


2)
Be respectful of colleague’s traditional approach.


3)
Faculty Development:

University of Maryland

ENEE 132

Engineering Issues in Medicine

Wesley Lawson

Department of Electrical and
Computer Engineering

http://www.uihealthcare.com/news/pacemaker/2004/summer/camerainapill.html

http://www.americanaed.com/padintro.html

University of Maryland


This course provides a
non
-
technical
introduction

to the
role of electrical and
computer engineering in modern medicine
,
by presenting an overview of the types of
biomedical devices currently used to
diagnose and treat medical conditions.


All aspects of the process of bringing a
new product or technology to market are
examined

and discussed, and the roles of
government, industry, as well as financial,
legal, ethical and social considerations are
critically explored.


Engineering Issues in Medicine

University of Maryland

General Goals for the course


-
Enrollment of 40+ students (some day up to 100+ students)


-
Meets science needs for CORE (General Education)
requirements at the University of Maryland


-
Presents ECE and science concepts, but limited math skills
are required for course


definitely
not

for STEM majors


-
Presents multi
-
faceted case studies so that students learn to
separate the science issues from the social issues


-
Keep class discussion lively and interesting via recent
developments (technical and societal) in medical devices

University of Maryland

Detailed Goals for the course:

this class will improve your
awareness of…


The range of disciplines that constitute Electrical and Computer
Engineering (ECE).


ECE systems, subsystems, and the interactions between subsystems.


Scientific and ECE technical concepts

related to medical devices.


The capabilities and limitations of modern technology in the medical
field.


The scientific evaluation process for experimental/clinical data.


The path traveled to convert an idea for a medical device into reality.


Ethical considerations in the medical device field.


Teamwork and group dynamics.


The importance of good written and oral communication skills.

University of Maryland

Course Structure


Two exams: Midterm and final


Two group projects with written and
oral deliverables; groups of ~4
“randomly”
-
assigned students


Mix of “technical” and essay
homework sets


Remaining course time is about a
50%
-

50% mix of lecture and group
discussion; discussions based on
readings or current events or
“experiments” performed in class


Class attendance required;
participation is 15% of grade

MagneMark Magnet Performance
1
10
100
1000
10000
0
20
40
60
80
100
Distance from magnet (mm)
Magnetic field (mG)
Earth's field
Magnet theory
Measurements
University of Maryland

Examples of ECE concepts:


Digital signal processing overview


Electric field basics


Energy storage elements
-

capacitors and inductors


Feedback & control overview


Kirchoff's Laws


Laser basics


Magnetic field basics


Resistors and Ohm's Law


Sensors, sensors, sensors


Voltage, current, and electrical power


Waves & frequencies: Ultrasound, RF, microwaves, optical and
X
-
rays


Wireless communication basics

University of Maryland


The Brain as an electrical device


Electric control of muscles



Low frequency current and voltage effects
on the body



Microwave radiation effects on the body



Normal sinus rhythm and arrhythmias



X
-
ray radiation effects on the body


Sample topics on electrophysiology and
electromagnetic
-
body interactions:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cochlear_implants

University of Maryland

Examples of group projects:

1.
Write a proposal for a new medical device... In the proposal:…


Describe what your product would be designed to do


Describe the devices that are currently on the market that are similar to your product.


Describe as clearly as you can what subsystems would be used in your device.


List technical questions that you need to answer before you could market your
device.


2.
This project is to concentrate on medical technology that improves
the quality of life for disabled persons. Your group must select a
disability and research relevant existing medical devices. The paper
should be structured as follows…


Describe what subsystems are used in your device. Make sure that as a minimum
you discuss power requirements, any control and communication systems, as well as
any computer software subsystems.


Describe in detail the human
-
device interface for your chosen device and discuss the
human factors engineering that went into the design of the interface.


Describe and hazards or safety issues related to your device.


Predict developments in medical device technology for this disability in the next 10
-
20 years.

University of Maryland

“Echoes” from this course… This course


was the first ECE CORE course exclusively for non ECE
-
students.


raised awareness in the ECE department of our responsibility to
offer courses to improve STEM literacy for non
-
STEM students.


utilized
undergraduate teaching fellows

to help guide the student’s
group projects, assist students with technical questions, and
develop asynchronous learning (web) materials for the course.


tested techniques to foster discussions between students from
diverse backgrounds that have been applied to another ECE
CORE course.


spawned an NSF proposal to match students from non
-
STEM
ENEE 132 and ECE seniors from ENEE 432 (Engineering Modern
Medicine) in a semester
-
long group project with weekly interactions
to investigate the ability of each group to impact the other…
(this
proposal has not yet been funded by NSF.)


University of Maryland

Lessons Learned:


Group work, Projects, Invited Speakers
engage students


Community of Marquee faculty, provides
support and opportunity to learn from each
other

University of Maryland

Reinvention, Nov. 2008


Student variability



Motivation



Some students are just fulfilling requirements


“I
had

to take a science course and this looked the
easiest”


Many students are more motivated to do well in their
major than in a compulsory science course.


Academic abilities


Math anxiety


Comfort with science

Challenges

University of Maryland

Reinvention, Nov. 2008

Large lecture classes


Loss of contact with the individual student


TA’s become the point of contact not the
professor.


Weekly meetings with the TA’s


Instituting a training course for all Marquee TA’s.


Professional development opportunity for graduate
students


Difficult to bring authentic experiences to the
classroom (field trips, for example, daunting for
large numbers!)

Challenges

University of Maryland

Reinvention, Nov. 2008

Challenges


Continuity


We are enthusiastic about these courses
because they are our courses.


How do we pass on this enthusiasm to faculty
member(s) who replace us ?


Should we?


University of Maryland


Survey of faculty


Student learning outcomes



Marquee Assessment

University of Maryland

Reinvention, Nov. 2008

At the completion of a Marquee Course in Science and Technology students
will be able to:


Ask good questions (sense
-
making questions; e.g. questions that lead to
increased understanding)


Relate science to a personal situation (Science is around them in their
everyday life)


Find information using various sources and evaluate the veracity of the
information (e.g. information literacy)


Look at complex questions (e.g. global warming, medical technology,
biodiversity) and identify the science in the question and how it impacts
and is impacted by political, social, economic, and ethical dimensions



Critically evaluate science arguments (e.g. those that are made in a news
article, a student presentation, on a TV show, presented to a lay person by a
physician etc)


Determine what they know and what they do not know. (Learn how to learn)


Communicate effectively ( to a variety of target audiences and within team
situations)


engage in conversation with staff on Capitol Hill, explain a
concept to peers).


Marquee Course Learning Goals

University of Maryland

Reinvention, Nov. 2008

October 19, 2007

Genetically altered food: Labels hotly debated in Iowa

By PAULA LAVIGNE

REGISTER STAFF WRITER

Iowa is playing center stage in a global debate over whether people
should be warned when the genetic makeup of their food has been
altered. A national advocacy group believes consumers would
demand that genetically modified foods be labeled if they knew just
how much is being changed in labs. The Campaign to Label
Genetically Engineered Foods is pushing presidential candidates to
support making labeling the law
-

with some success. Leading
Democrats Hillary Clinton and John Edwards agree to the
organization's proposal, as do candidates Bill Richardson and Dennis
Kucinich. Top Republican candidates have not

taken positions. "We want to make food safety a defining issue of this
election," said Anne Dietrich, the Fairfield, Ia.
-
based executive
director of the campaign. "Once this becomes the law of the

land, then Monsanto, Syngenta, Kraft and Kellogg's will reformulate their
products. Iowa is the best place to start."

www.desmoinesregister.com

University of Maryland

What is the science question?


Please
explain why

Student responses were rated:


Student understands the process of
science = 3


Student may understand the process of
science = 2


Student does not understand the process
of science = 1


University of Maryland

Reinvention, Nov. 2008


Explain why this is a science question

(136 students surveyed)


% Responses with
characteristics in
Categories

Student responses:

A

B

C

those who scored 1 (32%)

38%

14%

48%

those who scored 2 (29%)

45%

39%

15%

those who scored 3 (39%

19%

75%

5.6%

This is a science question because:

Category A: the topic is science, genetically modifying foods is a science
process, involves scientists, relates to humans

Category B: the question is testable, can be answered with an experiment,
scientific method can be applied

Category C: opinions about GM, political comments, article summaries

University of Maryland

Moving forward with the Marquee Project


Engage graduate students in innovative
teaching experience


Continue to add new Marquee courses


Affect some changes in how science is
taught beyond the Marquee non
-
majors
project

University of Maryland

This initiative was made possible by support from

Office of the Provost

Office of Undergraduate Studies

Center for Teaching Excellence

VIP
-
K16 NSF
-
MSP Award 0227325.