Walters State Community College Natural Science Division ...

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Walters State Community College

Natural Science Division

Technology Mobilization Plan


History


The Natural Science Division has an extensive track record of effective implementation of
technology within our classrooms in order to address student learning styles. From one of the
original smart classrooms at WSCC to a modern video
-
conferencing classro
om with podcasting
and video
-
streaming capabilities, the faculty of this division embraces each new technology
challenge aggressively. Our standard classroom presentation equipment includes a sympodium,
computer, document camera, projector and Bluetooth te
chnology. Student classroom engagement
is promoted by Personal Response System (clickers) embedded assessments within lecture and
end
-
of
-
term review session PowerPoint presentations. Active, hands
-
on learning is facilitated in
laboratories by utilizing Ver
nier and PASCO technologies that support current wet lab
experiences. These tools provide students opportunities to measure real
-
time activities and
incorporate data collections into tables, charts and graphs.


The Natural Science Division endeavors to en
gage our students outside the classroom
environment through technology such as eLearn, a Mastering template provided by Pearson
Publishing and a Connect template provided by McGraw
-
Hill Publishers. Each of our faculty
utilize
s

eLearn as a communication and

teaching tool.

Instructors utilize eLearn to provide
students with lecture notes, PowerPoint, Camtasia and Podcast presentations, practice quizzes,
test review sheets and calendar of events item.

They also communicate with students

using
eLearn and kee
p students apprised of the their progress by using the electronic gradebook tools.
Faculty members use their dockable laptops to record Camtasia, Tegrity and Podcast
presentations that are downloaded to their eLearn webpages. The Connect template is utiliz
ed in
the general biology courses while the Mastering template is utilized in Human Anatomy and
Physiology, Microbiology, Cell Biology, Biodiversity and Physics courses to provide additional
visual aids. The Mastering template also functions as an electron
ic tool for homework and end
-
of
-
chapter quizzes designed to identify and provide opportunities for remediation during topic
coverage. Human Anatomy and Physiology faculty members incorporate PhysioEx computer
simulations to support physiological experience
s and PAL/MyA&P computer simulations to
support human anatomical structures. Microbiology courses use Microbiology Place and Virtual
Unknowns to support lecture content and to simulate microbial laboratory

techniques.
Divisional faculty have developed a B
iology CD that provides students out
-
of
-
class access to
laboratory materials experiences supporting visual learning. This nine
-
year project is continually
updated and include additional photographs, videos and new material such as audio
pronunciations. It
currently is in the initial phase of “app” development utilizing MOBL21
technology.


The Natural Science Division has developed online and hybrid courses for nearly all of the
general education curricula. Divisional faculty members are the developers for t
he RODP
Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II, General Microbiology, General Physics I and II, and
Physics with Calculus I and II courses. This course roster is expected to exceed 100 sections in
the 2011 Fall Term. The division conducts, with the assistan
ce of academic trainers, an annual
Natural Science Division Summer Institute that addresses appropriate training on current
technological tools for online instruction. These sessions have introduced technologies such as
Podcast, Camtasia, Turnitin.com, Res
pondus, Respondus Lockdown Browser, Learning Object
Repository (LOR), Vernier technology training and iPad training.

All of these have been
adopted by other divisions within the college. These sessions visualized the usage of release
conditions for QEP Su
rveys and online faculty/student evaluations along with discipline specific
discussions on the benefits for electronic homework and quizzing. These collaborative activities
fueled the collegial confidence required as this division transitions into a mobili
zed teaching
model that shifts the learning environment into a more challenged
-
based learning experience that
engages the individual learner to construct their own learning experience by applying the
curricula content to real
-
world situations.



Overview o
f Division Plan



The Natural Science Division Technology Mobilization Plan is designed by a faculty team
recruited based on their interest, academic discipline, and documented plan for classroom
implementation. This team initially met on March 23, 2011 a
nd was directed to identify Phase 1
activities that would incorporate iPad assisted instructional techniques into their 2011 Summer
Term courses and to define methods they will incorporate to assess effectiveness. During the
Natural Sciences Summer Institu
te the team will demonstrate their projects to departmental
colleagues. This annual session will also provide iPad and related technology tools training for
all interested divisional faculty and staff. This team will assist the dean to identify additional
training opportunities that are beneficial to our faculty and students.


Phase II will be initiated during 2011
-
2012 Fall/Spring terms. The mobilization team members
will pilot challenged
-
based learning activities that target student learning outcomes (SL
Os) that
current assessment analyses have identified as areas of student deficiencies. The division will
assess effectiveness quantitatively by utilizing course final exam assessment data and electronic
homework/chapter quiz data for sections using new tec
hnology
-
driven techniques versus
traditional lecture classroom sections. Qualitatively, the division will assess student engagement
by adapting the current electronic QEP survey on eLearn to include questions that request
student satisfaction levels.



Ph
ase I of Natural Science Divisional Plan


The Natural Science Division faculty members were invited by the Dean of Natural Sciences to
submit proposals to be on the Natural Science Division Technology Mobilization Team. Team
member selection was based on t
he strength of their projects, their experience with applying
innovative technology in the classroom and their academic discipline. Candidates were asked to
submit two projects using iPads that could be implemented during their 2011 summer courses.
While o
ne project could include apps, the second project had to include the use of technology
tools other than apps. This stipulation was designed to provide a holistic approach to
mobilization. Previous experience with innovative classroom technology suggests a
high level of
creative energy and vision that is essential as the division redefines its teaching and learning
methods to better align with its student learners.

Inclusion of multiple academic disciplines
provides a unique inter
-
discipline collaborative e
nvironment where shared academic concepts
can be evaluated across multiple courses for their

best practices benefit.


Eight faculty members were selected from the pool of thirteen candidates. Appendix I lists their
projects. The required criteria for elig
ible proposal submission included:



Student Learning Outcome to be addressed



Rationale for the selection based on comprehensive final exam assessment data



Scope of how the project would engage the student



Assessment method utilized to measure level of enga
gement and retention of content



The Natural Science Division implements a common comprehensive final exam for each course.
The comprehensive final exam is aligned with the student learning outcomes outlined on the
common course syllabus. Final Exam analy
sis supports course modification to address student
deficiencies on student learning outcomes assessed over a multiple
-
semester timeline. These
proposals address specific areas of student deficiencies that the faculty members routinely
assimilate into thei
r course delivery adaptation. Once approved, the division commits to fund
and/or locate funding to support the project technology requirements. The division commits to
work with the Instructional Design Team (IDT) to facilitate any faculty training, techno
logy
upgrades, “app” acquisition and/or development required for a given project.


These pilot projects will be conducted mostly during the 2011 summer sessions. The team
members will debrief with their colleagues and members of IDT concerning the student

engagement benefits during the Natural Science Division Summer Institute. These best practice
models will help visualize the possibilities for our colleagues and hopefully lead to additional
training opportunities. The team members will also present their

project findings during a
summer collaborative session associated with WSCC Google Academy and at an Innovative
Professor Conference in November (3 proposals accepted by conference review board).


Student feedback will be evaluated from the common QEP sur
vey that has been adapted to
include questions that address mobilization. Appendix II illustrates the additional questions that
will be a component of the divisional QEP survey. The intent of these additional questions is to
capture the students’ technolog
y access capabilities and to measure the extent they appreciate
mobilized visual learning tools.


Phase I projects will culminate with a team retreat at the end of summer term where members
can articulate their experiences and reflect on the appropriate di
rection of additional
implementation of pilots across multiple sections. Team members from other divisions will be
invited to help to develop a multiple
-
discipline plan that employs common best practice
techniques.




Phase II of Natural Science Division
Plan


Phase II will be initiated during 2011
-
2012 Fall/Spring terms. The mobilization team members
will pilot challenged
-
based learning activities that target student learning outcomes (SLOs) that
current assessment analyses have suggested as areas of stud
ent deficiencies. Additional faculty
members will be recruited to participate in the pilot as identified by the team with the goal of
inclusion of all natural science disciplines within this plan by the end of Phase II activities.
Appendix III lists the Ph
ase II Faculty and Staff Mobilization Plans.


The unique addition to Phase II will be the emphasis on developing challenge
-
based learning
opportunities that motivate student engagement. The intent is to use the technology, iPads and
accompanying technology

tools piloted in Phase I, along with the Internet, to develop real
-
world
scenarios. Such scenarios should challenge students to utilize technology to assimilate and
accommodate curricular content to resolve a complex problem. These scenarios could be sing
le
laboratory question or problems that expand the content within a student learning outcome.

They could also be a

capstone exercise that integrates all the curricular content.


The popularity of such television shows as “House” and the explosion of the

gaming industry
suggests that students are most engaged when they are challenged to think creatively and
constructively in a technology
-
driven environment. They tend to prefer being “collaborated
with” instead of “lectured to.” Thus, Phase II will integra
te “shared learning experience” projects
within lecture classrooms that encourage student engagement and permit usage of technology.
iPads, PRS and other interactive technology will be employed to challenge students to apply
content knowledge to solve scen
arios independently and collaboratively.


Additionally, the division will pilot MOBL21 technology. This technology will allow “app”
development of course
-
specific content. As an additional innovation, if the division plans to
engage at least one of the book publishers to work with faculty members
to develop and pilot
mobile “challenge
-
based learning” experiences.

These will provide students from multiple
disciplines and institutions an opportunity to work collaboratively to address real
-
world
situations.


As with Phase I, Phase II will have an as
sessment component that measures the student benefits.
This assessment will have both qualitative and quantitative components with both student
learning outcomes and engagement being assessed. Collaborative pilots with book publisher(s)
could entertain opp
ortunities for a follow
-
up retreat to disseminate best practice pilots and
explore additional pilots.



Natural Science Division Assessment Plan


The Natural Science Division will assess effectiveness quantitatively by utilizing course final
exam assessme
nt data and electronic homework/chapter quiz data for comparison of results from
sections using new technology
-
driven techniques with

traditional lecture classroom sections.
Qualitatively, the division will assess student engagement by adapting the curren
t electronic QEP
survey on eLearn to include questions that request student satisfaction levels (see Appendix 2).
Additional assessment will be prescriptive and dependent of the specific project as outlined in
the proposal.



Role of Institutional Design T
eam


For these pilots to be successful the team members will work in conjunction with the IDT to
develop collaborative, forward thinking dialogue concerning best practice techniques. The team
requests that IDT:



Provide initial team members training as they

acquire their iPads.



Assist in identifying “apps” and technology tools to pilot.



Identify productivity and utility “apps” that make iPads more mobile and allow team
members to work collaboratively.



Be the primary academic trainers, developing a schedule
of technology training sessions
that would familiarize the team with available tools and any upgrades of tools being used
in the classroom.



Support Cloud technology training such as Google tools.




Future Natural Science Division Goals


The Natural Scie
nce Division’s intent is to include all faculty members that desire access to these
activities. It is the team’s hope that:



Access to a “challenged
-
based learning” environment that incorporates technology
familiar to the learner will support engagement and

improve retention.




The technology becomes second
-
nature as the classroom becomes more collaborative.



The lecturer engages the learner in creative, constructive exercises that challenge the
learner to assimilate and accommodate curricular content.



The
technology will encourage mobile learning.



The technology will support adaptive lecturing techniques such as class sets of iPads that
support clickers as testing tools and for laboratory support for technology such as Vernier
and PhysioEx.



The model will
replace written memorization with higher
-
order learning applications that
will benefit our students and better prepare them for adaptive workforce challenges.



The Natural Science Division pilots will strive to create learning environments that are not
li
mited to singular explanations but include inquiry. Ideally, learning will migrate towards
etextbook and/or open
-
access technology
-
driven learning experiences that minimize student cost
and open students to personal acquisition of the learning tools. Facul
ty will be encouraged,
supported, and rewarded for investing energies to explore innovative teaching methods.

Appendix I: Phase I Faculty Projects by Class

Natural Science Division

Technology Mobilization Team

Projects proposed for Summer 2011


1. Chemist
ry 1110

Students will gain the ability to interactively participate in naming/writing formulas of
compounds.

SLO:

Give proper IUPAC names for both ionic and molecular compounds; Write correct
formulas for ionic and molecular compounds given the correct IUPAC name.

Rationale:

Students struggle with this concept throughout the semester and even in Chemistry
1120. Stude
nts do not retain the knowledge of writing names/formulas and we spend time re
-
teaching them later or just giving them the formula, thus losing the ability to associate the name
and formula together.

How the technology will allow student engagement:


Using

applications such as Chemistry
Formulas 2.1 and Chem Lab (a naming/formula game) will allow students to be technologically
engaged. This will strongly accommodate the large number of students that are active, visual,
and sequential learners.

Assessment:

I

plan to give a minute paper on the app to get student feedback. I will also give a
brief quiz after using the app in class to determine its effectiveness.


2. Chemistry 1110

Students will have the ability to visualize properties of gases as outlined in le
cture.

SLO:


(several SLO’s combined) Use Boyle’s Law, Charles’s Law, Gay
-
Lussac’s Law, and the
ideal gas law to show the appropriate relationships between pressure, volume, and temperature
for gases.

Rationale:

Gases are an important aspect of Chemistry 1
120. They are discussed in detail during
the intermolecular forces, kinetics, and equilibrium chapters. Students tend to not retain
information about the properties of gases from Chemistry 1110 because there is not a significant,
engaging role placed on th
em in either lecture or lab.

How the technology will allow student engagement:


Using the “baby elmo” camera and
Camtasia, video demonstrations can be created and posted to eLearn showing an actual
demonstration of the gas laws for students to view. These
same videos could also be used as a
quick review tool for gases in Chemistry 1120.

Another aspect for this technology will be reaching out to local middle and high school science
teachers. These short clips will give them access to modern and scientificall
y sound videos to
incorporate into their classrooms.

Assessment:

I would like to monitor how many times the videos are viewed through eLearn. An
eLearn quiz will be given to determine the effectiveness of the videos. Precautions such as
having the quiz cov
er multiple videos and time limit on each quiz question will be implemented
to prevent students from watching the videos as they take the quiz.


1. BIOL 2010 Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lecture

SLO:

The student will be able to demonstrate and understand c
ell structure and function.

Rationale:


The departmental average on the Fall 2010 final exam was 57. Approximately 20%
of the final exam questions come from Ch. 3 “ Cells: The Living Units”.

How the iPad will allow student engagement:


Using applications during lecture that focus on
cellular organelles and their corresponding functions should increase student discussion, learning
and interaction.

Assessment tool:

I will give a quiz following an iPad presentation on cellular organelles
. This
will allow me to assess the students’ level of knowledge and degree of comprehension.


2. BIOL 2010 Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lecture

SLO:


The student will be able to explain the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system.

Rationale:


Concerni
ng the central nervous system, the departmental average on the Fall 2010
final exam was 49.

How the iPad will allow student engagement:


Using applications during lecture that focus on
naming sections of the brain and spinal cord and describing their corr
esponding functions will
enhance our students' knowledge and provide an excellent platform for discussions.

Assessment tool:


I will give a quiz following an iPad presentation on the central nervous
system. This will allow me to assess the students’ level
of knowledge and degree of
comprehension.



1. BIOL 2010 Human Anatomy and Physiology I


Web Based

Journey Into and Out of the Cell…Literally

SLO:

The student will be able to demonstrate and understand cell structure and function.

Rationale:

Many anatomy
and physiology students, especially those that take the course in an
online environment, have difficulty understanding cellular transport processes. To an extent,
online courses put those visual learning students at a disadvantage due to lack of interactio
n. If
short online interactive experiments and simulations were available, these opportunities would
further reinforce the importance of understanding passive and active transport processes relevant
to cellular survival and function.

Project Description an
d Engagement:
Using the iPAD, IPEVO, Camtasia, and D2L a short
interactive demonstration of passive cellular transport processes will be developed and provided
to the students via eLearn. The demonstration will involve using dialysis bags as semi
-
permeable

membranes and a variety of solutions (40% glucose, 10% NaCl, and starch) to explore how
molecular weight and solute concentration affect membrane transport. Data such as initial and
final weight, positive and negative controls, and a variety of solute tes
ts like Benedicts, IKI, and
silver nitrate will further reinforce the importance of membrane transport concepts like diffusion,
osmosis, and filtration. A data table will also be included to allow manipulation and development
of hypotheses.

Assessment:

Usi
ng the data from the QEP survey, I will evaluate whether students thought this
opportunity was beneficial. Comparisons of present and past data collected via lecture exams and
the comprehensive final will also be assessed.


2. BIOL 2010 Human Anatomy and P
hysiology I


Web Based

Title:

Goldilocks and the 3 Bears

SLO:

The student will be able to demonstrate and understand cell structure and function.

Rationale:

Many anatomy and physiology students, especially those that take the course in an
online
environment, have difficulty understanding the importance of the relationship between
intracellular and extracellular environments. To an extent, online courses put those visual
learning students at a disadvantage due to lack of interaction. If short onlin
e interactive
experiments and simulations were available, these opportunities would further reinforce the
importance of understanding why the extracellular environment is so important in directing cell
function.

Project Description and Engagement:


Using t
he iPAD, IPEVO, Camtasia, and D2L a short
interactive demonstration of hypertonic, hypotonic, and isotonic environments will be developed
and provided to the students via Elearn. Using 3 different solutions (100% distilled water, 10%
NaCl, and 0.9% NaCl) a
nimal blood samples will be added and the environments examined.

Students will be asked to focus on which environment is optimal for erythrocytes and to
determine why processes such as crenation and hemolysis occur. A sample of each
“environment” will the
n be placed on a microscope and investigated for anatomical changes.
Students will be asked to determine how and why the anatomy of an erythrocyte is so important
to the function.

Assessment:

Using the data from the QEP survey, I will evaluate whether stud
ents thought this
opportunity was beneficial. Comparisons of present and past data collected via lecture exams and
the comprehensive final will also be assessed.


3. BIOL 2010 Human Anatomy and Physiology I


Web Based

Title:

Digging up BONES…

SLO:

The stu
dent will be able to describe the growth, development, anatomy and physiology of
the skeletal system.

Rationale:

Many anatomy and physiology students, especially those that take the course in an
online environment, have difficulty understanding the physiol
ogy involved in bone composition.
To an extent, online courses put those visual learning students at a disadvantage due to lack of
interaction. If short online interactive experiments and simulations were available, these
opportunities would further reinfo
rce the relationships between organic and inorganic bone
composition.

Project Description and Engagement:


Using the iPAD, IPEVO, Camtasia, and D2L a short
interactive demonstration of how temperature and pH can drastically affect the chemical
composition

of bone will be developed and provided to the students via Elearn. Chicken bones
will be baked (simulating a hyperthermic condition) or placed in vinegar (simulating an acidic
condition). After the period of hyperthermia or acidity, the bones will be phys
ically examined.
Students will be asked to determine how and why the heat and acid disrupted the chemical
composition. Students will also be asked to determine whether the organic composition,
inorganic composition, or both were affected.

Assessment:

Using

the data from the QEP survey, I will evaluate whether students thought this
opportunity was beneficial. Comparisons of present and past data collected via lecture exams and
the comprehensive final will also be assessed.


4. BIOL 2010 Human Anatomy and Phy
siology I


Web Based

Title:

EYE can see your BRAIN

SLO:

The student will be able to explain the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system.

Rationale:

Many anatomy and physiology students, especially those that take the course in an
online environment,
have difficulty fully visualizing the brain and eye anatomy. To an extent,
online courses put those visual learning students at a disadvantage due to lack of interaction. If
short online interactive experiments and simulations were available, these opportu
nities would
allow for interactive demonstrations of brain and eye dissection.

Project Description and Engagement:

Using the iPAD, IPEVO, Camtasia, and D2L a short
interactive demonstration of how brain and eye dissection allow for a more thorough evaluati
on
of anatomy will be developed and provided to the students via Elearn. Sheep brains and either
sheep or cow eyes will be dissected using dissecting trays, scalpels, probes, and scissors. As the
dissections occur important anatomical features will be emph
asized. Students will be able to
watch a virtual dissection that they would normally not have access to in an online lab
environment.

Assessment:

Using the data from the QEP survey, I will evaluate whether students thought this
opportunity was beneficial.

Comparisons of present and past data collected via lab exams will
also be assessed.


5. BIOL 2010 Human Anatomy and Physiology I


Web Based

Title:

re”VIEW” sessions

SLO:

multiple SLOs covered

Rationale:

Many students feel a loss of interaction when taking online courses, therefore
possibly causing a decrease in proper remediation leading to failure. By providing interactive and
“real time” review sessions students should be able to gain reinforcement of i
mportant concepts
and be more successful in the course. These review sessions will also provide extra opportunities
for discussion and engagement.

Project Description and Engagement:

Using the iPAD, IPEVO, Camtasia, Ink2Go, Air
Display, and possibly Skype
, WebEX, or Centra bi
-
weekly review sessions could be offered as a
supplement to the lecture and lab. For those students that do not have access or could attend the
sessions could be recorded using Camtasia and be made available via Elearn. The review
sess
ions could focus on more difficult concepts like homeostatic control, balancing chemical
equations, transcription and translation, cellular respiration, and muscle and nerve physiology.
Students would be able to gain immediate feedback and participate in d
iscussions in a way that
typically is not offered in an online environment.

Assessment:
Using the data from the QEP survey, I will evaluate whether students thought this
opportunity was beneficial. Comparisons of present and past data collected via lecture
exams and
the comprehensive final will also be assessed.


6. BIOL 2010 Human Anatomy and Physiology I


Web Based

Title:

“AP”ps (apps)

SLO:

multiple SLOs covered

Rationale:

Anatomy and physiology is a difficult course for all students, especially the
physi
ological concepts. Relevant applications could provide repetition, reinforcement, and
possibly even remediation for those concepts.

Project Description and Engagement:
Using the iPAD and other computer resources I would
assign relevant applications. While

these assignments would not necessarily be for credit, they
will be used to provide another avenue for investigation and understanding. Applications
focusing on transcription and translation, cellular respiration, and muscle and nerve physiology
would be
of the utmost importance.

Assessment:

Using the data from the QEP survey, I will evaluate whether students thought this
opportunity was beneficial. Comparisons of present and past data collected via lecture exams and
the comprehensive final will also be as
sessed.


1. BIOL 2010 Human Anatomy and Physiology I


RODP

Project
:

Increase Comprehension and Retention of Bone Names, Markings and Articulations.

SLO:

The student will be able to describe the growth, development, anatomy and physiology of
the skeletal
system.

Rationale
:

Students have little difficulty with the physiology of the skeletal system but do not
score well on the laboratory test which deals mainly with identifying bone and bone markings.


Project Description and Engagement:
I propose use of an

app “Speed Bones” or a similar one
to give students additional practice in this area.




My first step will be to review the available presentations

and look for one which
matches the terms we use and the names, markings, etc. that we require the students to
learn as closely as possible.



After making any necessary adjustments to the terms th
at we require the students to know
so to eliminate as much

confusion as possible, I will add the App to the required lecture
portion of the laboratory.


Assessment
:



I plan to divide the RODP Biol2010 sections into two groups.



One group will be given the

App on bones and one will not.



I will compare the scores of the two groups on the proctored laboratory

test on this
subject for three

semesters.



If there is a significant increase in scores of the students using the App, I will add it to the
course perm
anently.



Since student engagement and opinion are important, I will survey students to see if they
found the presentation useful.



2. BIOL 2010 Human Anatomy and Physiology I


RODP

Project
:

Increase Understanding of the Concepts Of Negative and Positi
ve Feedback.

SLO
:

The student will learn basic chemical concepts and apply them to a better

understanding of

physiological phenomena.

Rationale
:

Homeostatic control and negative and positive feedback are concepts that occur
through both anatomy and phys
iology courses in diverse areas such as birth, hormone regulation,
reflex arcs and enzyme regulation. These concepts are

presented in the first chapter of the
textbook.

Students

never score as well as I would like

on questions involving this subject on

the first lecture test.

Project Description and Engagement:
I have prepared a Tegrity presentation on this subject
called “Homeostatic Control Mechanisms” and incorporated it into the Anatomy and Physiology
I course for summer.


Assessment
:



I will compa
re the scores of this class on the questions on this subject to previous classes.



If there is a significant increase in scores of the students using the Tegrity Presentation, I
will add it to the course permanently.




Since student engagement and opinion are important, I will survey students to see if they
found the presentation useful.



1. BIOL2020 Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lecture

SLO
:

The student will demonstrate an understanding of the physiology of the cardi
ovascular
system.

Rationale
:


Students are capable of learning the basic anatomy and blood flow of the heart, but
lack the ability to grasp how the heart functions as a pump, and how things like disease, valve
disorders, etc, affect the overall function of

the pump.

Project Description & Student Engagement
:


Students will utilize applications such as Heart
Pro and Pocket Heart by Pocket Anatomy, this will allow students to see the heart at work and at
times of stress, so they may more easily relate these co
ncepts to cardiovascular physiology.

Assessment
:

The success of incorporating these applications in the classroom will be assessed
by administering short in class clicker quizzes after utilizing the tool in class.



2. BIOL 2020 Human Anatomy & Physiolog
y II Lecture

SLO
:

The student will be able to successfully explain acid
-
base balance problems.

Rationale
:

Diagnosing acid
-
base imbalance is an important aspect of BIOL2020. Students are
required to learn and build upon this information in subsequent cour
ses. Students struggle with
this concept.

Project Description & Student Engagement
:

We approach diagnosing the imbalances as with
a word
-
problem in mathematics.

The methodical approach for these diagnoses could be captured
using Camtasia in a combination

with interactive whiteboard on an iPad, so that even outside of
class, students can go through the same approach to figure out the imbalance on their own.


Assessment
:

The success of this teaching approach will be evaluated through a short quiz
admini
stered through eLearn.


1. BIOL 2230/2231
-

Introduction to Microbiology

SLOs:

Identify the physical and chemical requirements for microbial growth and control.

Describe viral replication, classification and laboratory culture methods.

Compare and contrast
methods and benefits of biotechnology, genetic modification and
recombinant DNA.

Rationale:

Students have difficulty understanding the mechanism of action of antibiotics and
other drugs along with their side effects and interactions.

There is also a deficiency in basic
laboratory techniques and the concepts of biotechnology.

Project descriptio
n & Student engagement
:

I have found a few apps that could be used to
address these deficiencies.

1.

Microbiology Wiz with Immunology $2.99
-

This app addresses the mechanisms and side
effects of drugs and antibiotics.

It also contains properties of microorg
anisms,
bacteriology, bacterial genetics, immunology, mycology, parasitology, and virology.

It
includes flash cards that can be utilized for quizzes and/ or reviews.

2.

Microbe World $4.99
-

This app contains video and audio podcasts.

There is also a PDF
fil
e of Microbe magazine, which is monthly news magazine for the American Society of
Microbiology.

This would allow students to stay current in the field of microbiology.

This would enable them understand the incidence and prevalence of diseases and could
a
lso be used as a benefit when it comes time for them to write the review paper.

3.

Basic Microbiology Lab Techniques $9.99
-

The is a textbook like app that has
multimedia and interactive learning that can help then students grasp the basic laboratory
techniqu
es of microbiology.

Some of the techniques that were listed
-

inoculating agar
plates and broths, aseptically using a pipette, growth and selective media, using a
microscope, Gram stain, and biochemical tests.


The iPad can also be used in the classroom wi
thout apps.

We would be able to take pictures of
stains to show to the entire class.

We could record video demonstrations of lab techniques that
could be studied outside of the classroom.

We could also include animations that demonstrate
various process
es that include electrophoresis, Western blot, transcription, translation, DNA
replication, and PCR.

Assessment:

I can compare questions from the final this spring semester to the upcoming
summer semester.


I could also include a pre
-

and post
-

quiz to see

if they are understanding the
material any better for assessments.


For the technology

survey questions, I would

just want to
know what techniques, operating system, and devices that they know how to use.


1. BIOL 1010 General Biology I

Title:


Observati
on of Photosynthesis

SLO:


Describe the basic steps of the light
-
dependent and light
-
independent reactions of
photosynthesis.

Rationale:

This is the section of the General Biology 1 final exam with the lowest student
scores.

More importantly students fai
r to grasp the significance of photosynthesis in maintaining
life on Earth.

Description:

A photosynthesis application and a video will be used to enhance understanding of
photosynthesis.

How mobilization will increase student engagement:



1. The Photosyn
thesis Study Guide Application may be used interactively in class to engage
student

engagement in conjunction with a student response system like clickers.

Ideally,

a game application would be

developed showing the deterioration of the Earth as plant l
ife
declines.


2. A video showing oxygen production and carbon dioxide uptake by a live plant can be used to

discuss the two stages of photosynthesis, the interaction between the two stages, and

significance of each stage of maintaining life on Earth.

The video can be taken with the baby

ELMO and augmented with Camtasia.

Assessment:
I plan to assess the effectiveness of the mobilized instruction through, in class
clicker quizzes, online quizzes, and retention assessment of exams and the final exam.


2. BIOL 1010 General Biology I

Title:

Visual Differentiation of Microbes

SLO:


Describe the basic characteristics of viruses, prokaryotes, and the different classifications
of protists.

Rationale:

This is the section of the General Biology 1 final exam wi
th the second lowest
student scores.

Description:


A series of videos will be created by the instructor with visual and written
descriptions of the differences between various types of microbes.

How mobilization will increase student engagement:



1. Videos of microbes taken through the microscope in the laboratory may be used to show the

visual differences between prokaryotes and eukaryotes and differences between the
different classifications of protists.

The videos can be formatted to be played

on mobile devices
and made available to students on eLearn.

The videos can also be used in class to supplement
the lecture content.The video can be taken with the baby ELMO and augmented with Camtasia.


Assessment:


I plan to assess the effectiveness of

the mobilized instruction through, in class
clicker quizzes, online quizzes, and retention assessment of exams and the final exam.




Appendix II

QEP Survey Technology Questions

Accompany the Common QEP SUrvey


QEP Mobilization Survey

1.

Please check the mob
ile device(s) that you own:

a.

iPhone

b.

Android smart phone

c.

Windows mobile phone

d.

Blackberry smart phone

e.

PDA

f.

iPad

g.

Android or other tablet

h.

iPod Touch

2.

How do you connect to the internet?



.

Dial
-
up access

a.

Cable modem

b.

DSL modem

c.

Satellite modem

d.

I only use the WSCC
internet connection

3.

Prior to enrolling in this course, did you possess the technical skills required to
participate in this course?

a.

Yes

b.

No

4.

The online homework/chapter quizzes:

a.

Were very effective learning tools that improved my interest and understanding of
course content.

b.

Were effective learning tools but too time consuming.

c.

Were time consuming and did not coordinate well with course content.

d.

Made studying content more difficul
t because it required extra time that I could
have more effectively utilized by reading textbook and notes.

5.

Do you feel that the online homework/chapter quizzes improved your test

grades:


.

Significantly

a.

Somewhat

b.

Not at all

c.

Actually decreased my test
grades

6.

Would you support using current lab fee funds to develop course
-
specific content
apps that would be made available to student through mobile devices?


.

Strongly support

a.

Support

b.

Do not support

c.

Strongly do not support


Appendix III: Phase II Faculty &
Staff Projects

Natural Science Division

Projects proposed for Fall 2011 & Spring 2012 Terms


Faculty


1. BIOL 2011 HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I LAB

Submitted by Laurence Fleming


SLO

:
The student will be able to explain the anatomy & physiology of the
nervous system.
Specifically the student will understand the General Sensation Special Senses of Vision and
Hearing (SLOs # 23 and 24).

Rationale:

Rather than depending on merely dissecting the eye or studying models of the eye
and ear, the student is abl
e to individually examine each anatomical structure and engage in
actual laboratory demonstrations of the specific functions of each part and of the whole organ.

Project Description and Engagement:

Using the iPad applications for Human senses of Vision
an
d Hearing, the student will be able to study the structure & function of the eye and ear as well
as performing various laboratory experiments of a more practical nature. These include right/left
ear hearing acuities as well as deficiencies, right/left visi
on acuities and defects, color blindness,
and astigmatism.

Assessment:

Much data collected over many years via lab exams are available for comparisons
with data presently obtained through the newly administered iPad lab exams.


2. BIOL 2021 HUMAN ANATOMY
& PHYSIOLOGY II LAB

Submitted by Laurence Fleming


SLO:


The student will demonstrate an understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the
cardiovascular system. Specifically the student should be able to grasp the “Anatomy of the
Heart” (Exercise # 30) a
nd the physiology of the heart through the study of the “Conduction
System of the Heart and Electrocardiography” (Exercise # 31).

Rationale:


Dissection of the sheep and cow hearts as well as the study of detailed heart models
is useful in lab for the stud
y of anatomy alone. However, the greater need is to closely associate
those parts with their individual actions and their contribution to the overall functioning of the
heart and the well
-
being of the human body.


3. BIOL 2020/2021 Anatomy & Physiology II

Submitted by Lisa Eccles


SLO:


The student will learn the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine system.

Rationale:

Students have difficulty understanding the endocrine system.

There is also a
deficiency in basic laboratory activities on the endocrine
system.

Many of the WSCC students
enrolled in BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021 are headed to the clinical field and their primary interest is in
clinical pathophysiology /medical disorders.

By presenting an Endocrine Disease app, student
interest and retention of sub
ject matter should increase substantially.

Project Design and Student Engagement:
I would like to separate students into discussion
groups and give each group an endocrine disorder to research using the free Endocrine Disorder
app with a classroom ipad.

A
fter a brief time period with their group, I would then ask the
student groups to present their assigned endocrine disease informally to the class following some
pre
-
assigned guidelines (including glands and pathways for hormone production, photos they can

find on the Endocrine Disorder app, disorder symptoms, etc.).

This app covers the following
endocrine disorders:

● Addison's Disease

● Cushing's Syndrome

● Diabetes

● Growth Disorders

● Hormone Replacement

● Metabolic Syndrome

● Thyroid Diseases

● And ma
ny more topics...

Assessment tool:
I will compare the scores of this class on the questions on this subject to
previous classes.



4. CHEM 1110/1120

Submitted:

Douglas W. Hensley

Introduction

After attending the July 15th Natural Science’s
Mobilization workshop on iPad in the classroom,
I was amazed at the numerous resources my colleagues had found and implemented for this
technology.

Their work clearly demonstrated the potential educational benefits this technology
offers to our teaching m
ethodology.

Its versatility seems almost limitless.

The ease of sharing
apps and ideas among the faculty by using an iPad is also a big plus for this technology.

Clearly
it is time to get aboard.


Title:

Using iPad with apps:

SLO & Rationale:

My initial
application of the iPad will be designed to target student learning
deficiencies associated with the more visual topics such as the periodic table layout, atomic
structure, quantum electronic structure, chemical bonding, molecular shapes, intermolecular
fo
rces and chemical kinetics.

These areas in particular would be helped by technology that can
provide a three 3
-
dimensional view of the concept.

The iPad’s flexibility would also allow it to
be used in other ways that would further develop the instructo
r’s QEP toolbox of new teaching
methods.

Project Description:

Outlined below are areas I initially envision the iPad could benefit my
teaching style and student performance.

1.

Use of iPad as a resource tool to more easily show visual concepts in the cl
assroom not easily
drawn on a two dimensional board.

In chemistry there are numerous topics in which 3
-
dimensional molecular representation and molecular motion would be ideal to visualize new
concepts.


2.

As more students obtain electronic devices c
ompatible with iPad apps, it will be possible to
share selected tutorial apps with these students.

These apps could address the more traditional
problem areas found in chemical nomenclature and calculations.


3.

The need to stay current with the techno
logy my peers and students are using.

As faculty
members discover useful apps for their classroom and administrative use, these can be easily
communicated and shared with the iPad.

It was shown in our recent meeting how easily this is
done, and such a
pp discovery and sharing would be a time saver and benefit to further faculty
development.

4.

The iPad can be tailored to the individual and used to locate educational resources that are
specifically applicable to my specific classroom approach to certain

topics.





5.

Identifying apps that could assist on the administrative side of the classroom would allow
more efficient use of faculty time in areas such as laboratory design and set
-
up.

This could
include apps that help streamline reagent preparati
on as well as identify new laboratory ideas.

Timeline:

Partial implementation of many of the items presented above is possible by the end of
the Fall
-
2011 term. By the end of the Spring
-
2012 term all of the proposed items should have
been tried in some for
m and evaluation then possible.


Assessment:

The Natural Science division monitors student performance on comprehensive final
exams. Exam questions can be associated with the various SLO mentioned like those listed
above.

Comparison of performance bef
ore and after iPad implementation on selected topics
could then be followed.



5. PHYS 2010/2011 and PHYS 2020/202: General Physics I & II and accompanying labs

Submitted by Sean Cordry


The Physics Department, in the Division of Natural Sciences, is fo
rmally requesting three iPad
32M units.

Two of these units would be distributed to Dr. Sean Cordry and Prof. Elena Owen.

The third unit would be for the new physics teacher.

The instructors will be piloting a variety of
implementations of the technology
.

The division currently has a cart with multiple units that
may be used by teams of students in lecture and laboratory contexts.

Some of the proposed applications are tied to specific Student Learning Outcomes, others are
broader in scope, and not specif
ically tied to any particular Outcomes.

All of these goals are
seen to be elastic, as new technology allows unforeseen innovation.

Prioritized Application Goals Specifically Tied to Student Learning Outcomes

1.


Kinematics: linear vs. accelerated motion



Need
: Kinematics is the study of motion, and comprises a major component of Student
Learning Outcomes for PHYS 2010.

While assessment via final exam analysis indicates that
students have achieved satisfactory results, such an assessment is “in
house,” and the
performance standards are largely subjective and “flexible.”

Assessment via the nationally
recognized Force Concept Inventory (FCI) indicates that significantly more work is necessary in
this most basic area of kinematics.



Soluti
on
: Various iPad “apps” are available for simulating motion under a variety of
different conditions.

Given appropriate challenge questions, teams of students will use the iPad
applications to explore the solutions to these questions.

The simulation can t
hem be coupled
with real experiences using our existing Vernier technology


combining the abstract ideas
(iPad) to the concrete (Vernier).

The embedded camera will also facilitate video analysis of
motion.



Assessment
: We will look for a 25% imp
rovement in relevant FCI assessment items.

2.


Kinematics: Projectile motion



Need
:

A kinematics topic involving two
-
dimensional motion.

The challenge for many
students, as reflected by assessment results from the FCI, is connecting real exper
iences to
abstract theoretical ideas.



Solution
: Various iPad “apps” exist that involve projectile work


many games.

Some
have already pioneered the use of such apps in introductory physics coursework.[i]

These
involve such things as checking

the validity of the physics as it is used by the game and making
predictions about the conditions of the simulation.

These simulations are particularly valuable
because, generally speaking, the white males of the classroom have plenty of experience with
projectiles, while minorities and females do not.

An intuition about the expected result of a
calculation is very useful in analyzing the possible correctness of any particular solution.

Teams
of students will be assigned tasks involving the “app.” The e
mbedded camera will also facilitate
video analysis of motion.



Assessment
:

We will look for a 25% improvement in relevant FCI assessment items.


3.


Electromagnetic Radiation: spectra, geometric optics and polarization



Need
: Assessmen
t based on final exam analysis indicates that, while students are meeting
the established goals, this is a very weak area that needs improvement.



Solutions
: Again, many apps exist to simulate and inform students in an engaging way


allowing them

to investigate a variety of situations.

The embedded camera will enable
monitoring of optical experiments in a new way: namely, taking the human eye out of the
experiment, and allowing groups to work more efficiently.

“Real” and “Virtual” imagery will b
e
studied.



Assessment
: We will look for a 30% improvement in assessment results.

Applications Not Tied to Specific Student Learning Outcomes

1.

The built
-
in microphone can allow very simple measurement of sound pressure levels.

This can be

useful in acoustic standing wave experiments, and possibly even speed
-
of
-
sound
measurements.

2.

The built
-
in microphone may allow for spectral analysis of various sound sources, which
will illustrate the complex make
-
up of everyday sounds.

Anatomic
al/physiological “apps” can
then be tied
-
in in order to illustrate how the cochlea of the inner ear performs an analog
decomposition of incoming sounds into base frequencies for analysis by the brain.

3.

The area of overlap between simulation use and

the method of Peer Instruction is ripe for
exploration.

4.

Because of their size, screen visibility, cost effectiveness, iPads will be a superior option to
computer
-
based lab experiments.

Peripheral Applications

1.

PHYS 2110/2111 and PHYS 212
0/2121 have parallel needs that will be similarly
addressed by the implementation of iPad technology for pedagogical improvement.

2.

PHYS 2210 (Engineering Statics) and PHYS 2220 (Engineering Dynamics) are also ripe
areas for students to engage the c
oncepts via the careful use of “apps.”

These pre
-
Engineering
students especially need work in collaborative, challenge
-
based environments in order to prepare
them for advanced coursework.

The implementation of technology in the “Statics” and
“Dynamics” l
abs is an ongoing effort.

3.

ASTR 1030/1031 (Astronomy) will see students using a variety of astrophysical “apps” to
locate various celestial objects and learn about basic astronomy concepts.

Many of these
applications can function as a hand
-
held pl
anetarium.

Coupling this technology will be a
tremendous asset to the observatory as well.

One can imagine public events where participants
get both a planetarium
-
type experience as well as an observatory viewing.




[i] See for example:

http://www.boingboing.net/2011/07/14/angry
-
birds
-
on
-
a
-
phy.html
,

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/youth
-
radio
-
youth
-
media
-
international/physics
-
teacher
-
brings
-
an_b_898836.html
,

http://fnoschese.wordpress.com/2011/06/16
/angry
-
birds
-
in
-
the
-
physics
-
classroom/


6. PSCI 1030/1031 Concepts of Earth and Space Science with Laboratory

ASTR 1030/1031 Astronomy

Submitted by Olena Owens


SLO:
The student will be able to describe, memorize and understand the main concepts of these
c
ourses.

Rationale:

A lot of times students have a hard time with the sciences and mathematics; they are
strongly encouraged to read this material over and over until they understand it.

How the iPad will allow student engagement:
During my lecture I will
use applications that
focus on physical/astronomical terminology. The use of correct science terminology in report
writing is vital to make sure the information is correctly and commonly understood.

Another
way using an iPad(s): I plan to compare past tes
t scores with test scores on the same materials
after using an iPad(s).

More examples using an iPad during lectures:

-

I could send from my iPad all video out to the projector;

-

Creating presentations with apps like
Prezi
and
Keynote
;Many

lessons have be
en made in
PowerPoint. What`s the alternative for iPad?
Keynote!
And it`s so much better! Keynote helps
you create an easy to use, quality presentation that would be difficult to make look bad!

-

Conducting workshops or hands
-
on activities where students e
xplore interactive learning apps,
such as
Star Walk;

-

Keeping track of class discussions using thought mapping tools, popular ones being
Outliner

and
iThoughts

-

Teaching Mathematics (also good for Physics):


SpaceTimeMathematics


PocketCAS



a
new computer algebra system for iPhone, iPad

How to use the iPad for class

organization:

There are uses for the iPad in education outside
of the classroom as well.

-

Gather readings using the
Papers

app, a scholarly article search engine;

-


Sync your
email to your iPad

-


Use “Skype” in communication

-


Many books can be downloaded free through

iBooks

Summary:

Here are a few good ideas that iPad is going to improve our teaching.

-


It`s active, not passive.

With the iPad, you “pinch”, “flick”, and “tap


your way to consume
the information and connect more interactively with the content.

-

It`s a lot like paper

-

It`s full of sensors

-

It`s single minded.

On the iPad , any application you run takes over the full screen. So, when
you launch your note
-
tak
ing app for class it`s the only thing you see. It improves focus.

-

The angle is better.

Because of its design, the best way to use an iPad is flat on a table or tilted
up at a slight angle. This eliminates the physical and visual barrier that most laptops

create
between the students and teacher.


7. Testing for Visually Impaired Benefits

Submitted by Natural Science Dean and Mark Dunaway


Dean Statement:
The

division requests an iPad for Mark Dunaway with the intent initially to test
the benefits and features of an iPad for visually
-
impaired faculty, staff and students. In this
instances, the division will not initially request a classroom project; but reques
t that Mark pilot
apps and iPad features that will help him integrate mobile learning and better access to
technology for visually
-
challenged individuals. His plan is:


Based on the knowledge of iPads that I have thus far, the device could possibly provide

me
access to software programs, web pages and webmail access, iBooks, and scanned documents.

The device will also allow me to access various field guides for use as reference materials for
the Birds in the Classroom project, as part of my recording field
work, and in class
-
related field
activities if the opportunity arises.


Staff

The division requests iPads for administrative staff that have direct contact with students. The
plans have been modified to simply summarize the initial ways the staff plan to u
se

iPads to be
more efficient in their tasks.


1. Mobilization Plan for Sherry Woody

I would use the iPad for the following projects:

1.

Accessing my computer/documents while away from my desk (on a WSCC
network)

2.

Taking minutes at meetings.

3.

Sched
uling appointments for meetings when I am not at my desk. (Send
appointment for next meeting while still in a meeting)

4.

Attending a meeting via Skype if I needed to stay and answer phones.

All of the above projects would help in productivity as they wou
ld save time and help with the
office work flow.

2. Mobilization Plan for Elizabeth Richardson

Learning Center Specialist iPad request:

An iPad would allow me to use productivity apps, such as Lab Planner, that has a calendar to
schedule lab activities an
d allows lists of materials needed for each lab as well as a “cookbook”
of reagent recipes all in a portable format.

The iPad also has an application that would allow me
to track the location of equipment by taking a photo of the equipment in its storage
location.

This would be very useful for those items that are used infrequently and are “out
-
of
-
sight, out
-
of
-
mind” most of the year.

An iPad would also allow me to better assist students who are studying.

I would be able to offer
information from apps fr
om several different subject areas depending on what the students are
studying without having to search for the appropriate text or lab manual.

I would also be able to
repeat iPad apps that students experienced in lab (like the vision testing app) with st
udents who
do not have an iPad but would benefit from repeating the activity.

I also think having photo capability will be useful for documenting student activities and lab
results.

The photos can be emailed to students as a visual reminder of the activit
y and their
results.

In general, an iPad would give me another means of being connected within the department.

I
would be using the technology to coordinate lab activities, assist students, and be more capable
of assisting faculty in implementing this te
chnology.