Syllabus - Gannon University

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Dec 14, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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Department of Computer

and

Information Science, Gannon University


CIS 3
92/GCIS592


Special Topics: Mobile Applications Programming

Instructor

Dr. Frank

Xu

Office

Zurn

312






























Email

x
u001

Phone

(814)871
-
5708



































Credit

3



Course
Objective
:


The course provides an in
-
depth review of concepts, design
strategies, tools and APIs needed to create, test and deploy advanced applications for
Android
mobile phones. Topics include:
concepts of t
he
android applications
components
and
component lifecycles;
design
ing

of mobile user interfaces;

the concepts of
application resources
,
intents,
and intent filters; developing android applications
with

data
storage
s, reusing o
f existing
services

, widgets,
and APIs
, such as

telephony, messaging,
graphics and animation, multimedia, peer
-
to
-
peer communication
;

the concepts of
Android
performance,
and
security.

The
course explores the Android Operating System
and its supporting SDK

2.2
.



Prerequisite
:


C++/Java or instructor permission.




Textbook

(optional)
:



Ed Burnette, Hello, Android: Introducing Google's Mobile Development Platform
(Pragmatic Programmers). Pragmatic Bookshelf; 3 edition (July 20, 2010), ISBN
-
10:

1934356565



Frank Ableson
,

Charlie Collins
,

Robi Sen
,
Unlocking Android: A Developer's
Guid
,

M
anning Publications; 1 edition (April 21, 2009), ISBN
-
10:

1933988673


Tentative

Topics
:

Topic

What is Android?

Android

Hello world

Beyond Hello world

-

Golf Sores

Golf Sores Event handling

Application Fundamentals

UI Concepts

Hello View

Widgets & Other Views (1)

Widgets & Other Views (2)

Data Storage

Hello Map

Hello Web view

Department of Computer

and

Information Science, Gannon University



Grading Polices:

Grade

Grade Scale

Points

A

90% and above

360+

B

80%
-

89%

320~359

C

70%
-

79%

280~319

D

60%
-

69%

240~279

F

59% and below

below 240




Item

Points

Assignments

10
0

Presentation

30

Quizzes

7
0

Midterm

100

Final

100

Total

400




Course Policies:




Homework is due
by the beginning of the next class.



Late homework will be given zero.



You cannot start a new assignment until the previous assignment has been
received by the instructor.



No make
-
up
quizzes
/exams will be allowed without prior arrangements being
made.



Do
not ask questions such as "How do you solve Problem X?" Explain what you
have done and ask a specific question in that context.



Be seated, quiet, and ready to learn when the class time begins.

Do not speak
when someone else is speaking.




Do not eat or dri
nk in class because the sights, smells, and noises can be
distracting to others. Be considerate and respectful of everyone.




To appeal a grade, send an e
-
mail to your instructor's e
-
mail address within two
weeks of the grade having been received. Overdue a
ppeals will not be considered.



All noise
-
make devices, such as cellular phones, pagers, CD players, radios, and
similar devices are prohibited in the classroom and laboratory facilities.



Calculators and computers are prohibited during examinations and quiz
zes, unless
specified.



Reasonable laptop
-
size computers may be used in lecture for the purpose of
taking notes.


Cheating Policy
:

Department of Computer

and

Information Science, Gannon University




(Cheating) Turning in someone else's work as your own (with
or without his or
her knowledge). Turning in a completely duplicated assignment is a flagrant
offense.



(Cheating) Allowing someone else to turn in your work as his or her own.



(Cheating) Several people writing one program and turning in multiple copies, al
l
represented (implicitly or explicitly) as individual work.



(Cheating) Using any part of someone else's work without the proper
acknowledgment.



(Cheating) Stealing an examination or solution from the instructor. This is an
extremely flagrant offense.



(Not

Cheating) Turning in work done alone or with the help of the course's staff.



(Not Cheating) Submission of one assignment for a group of students if group
work is explicitly permitted (or required).



(Not Cheating) Getting or giving help on using the comput
er for the course.



(Not Cheating) Getting or giving help on how to solve minor syntax errors.



(Not Cheating) High level discussion of course material for better understanding.



(Not Cheating) Discussion of assignments to understand what is being asked for.