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Running head:
FUTURE VISION OF
EDUCATION


1








Future Vision of
Education

Ivette Veiga

Course: 505.9: Future of Education

Instructor: Jennifer Wojcik



FUTURE VISION

OF EDUCATION


2


Future Vision of Education

As the title states, t
his present
ation is about the future
of education
.

It is

based on the
study of presented projects and trends, futurists’ statements, rules and regulations

established in
public schools
, among other important sources.

Technology is on
e of the main topics this
presentation will address because
it
has demonstrated that it is an important instrument
our
society benefits from.

N
ot only
in
education, but other fields such as economics, politics,
science, and so many others have used techno
logy to improve
and meet their expectations.

Its
progress has grown rapidly, and it promises to continue in that direction.

Educational Organization

The Florida Education Association

(FEA)

was founded in

1
886 as the first professional
educators’ organization, later known as the teachers’ union.

T
he FEA

is a non
-
profit
-
organization formed in 2000 by the union of two education associations, The Florida Teaching
Profess
ions
-
NEA and FEA/United.

This

organization has continue
d developing and updating
high

standards to provide academic excellence to
all
students.


Florida educators are i
mp
lementing new standards, whose

mai
n purpose is
to
graduate
students
from high

school with a deeper knowledge
for
college or for the workforce.

Florida
Department of Education states, “The Common Core State Standards

(CCSS)

were researched,
written and developed by professional educators and education experts from across the United
States” (Florida Department of Education, Common Core State Standards, para.1).

Florida
Education Asso
ciation has informed and assisted

teachers

through online seminars, trainings,
and
websites

such as Share My Lessons,
as

a
new digital platform for teachers, to create and share
experiences, ideas, lessons plans with effective instru
ctio
ns, worksheets, among other thi
ngs
.
This website facilitates

instruction

to assist and support teachers with the implementation of the
FUTURE VISION

OF EDUCATION


3


Common Core State Standards.

Technology
is a great source to consider.
Accessing digital
storytelling, software,
and
tablets with innumerable free application
s

not only to reinforce
instructio
n, but helps those

whose condition
affects their learning process. F
or example:
an
Android application that enables visual
ly

im
paired students to learn math.
Laptops, smart boards
for interactive activities, game
s and gami
fication, among other

technology tools should be
accessible in the classrooms to fa
cilitate and
deliver instruction.
Florida Education Association
is a great source for teachers and students to be informed, trained
, and prepared to meet
education’s expect
ations.

(Fl Department of Education: Tools for teachers, 2010).

This organization also serves students in
colleges, universities, and
Florida Community
Colleges whose fut
ure is in the education field.
Student

Florida Education Association (SFEA)
members

have access to all information and resources available to support their bright and
successful career
s
. “SFEA is open to any college student that is interested in the education field.

We foster the teaching skills of all students through our three core values of Teacher Quality,
Community Outreach, and Political Action” (SFEA, 2013). Florida Education Association not
only serves teachers, students, but paraprofessionals, custodians, b
us drivers, food service
personnel, securities, secretaries, and so many others who protect, guide, and provide students
with
a saf
e and appropriate environment.
They are essential partners in the education process.

Historical Event

The Wechsler

Intellige
nce Scale (WAIT) is a

historical event highly significant at the
time it was created and directl
y link
ed to the current time
.

The
WAIT

was developed
in 19
39 by
David Wechs
ler, who led American Psychological Association
.

This test, designed to measure
int
elligence, was used in individuals over 74 years of age.

Later in 1949, the Wechsler
Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) was created, based on
the
WAIT test, to measure
FUTURE VISION

OF EDUCATION


4


intelligence in children aged 7 to 16. Years later (1967), the Wechsler Preschool
and Primary
Scale Intelligence (WPPSI) appeared, this time to be use
d

with children aged 2½ to 7 years old.

Wechsler

based his tests on his belief

that “
intelligence is the global capacity to act purposefully,
to think rationally, and to deal effectively

with [one's] environment" (Wechsler, 1944, p. 3, as
cited in Kaufman & Lichtenberger, 1999).

He defined intelligence as an effect rather than a
cause.


The WISC has been revised throughout the years
by updating norms,
represented
populations, materials,
and
changes

to the questions.


The current version, WISC
-
IV, produced in
2003 an
d revised a year later,
is a great tool used to determinate if
a

learning disability is present

which is based on the child’s IQ score

on the tests.


The test allows
one to det
ermine

discrepancies between a child’s intelligence and performance at school. These tests provide a
verbal Intelligen
ce

Quotient (I.Q.) score, a Performance I.Q. score, and a Composite score based
on the combined scores.

Five Years Vision

The future
vision of FEA i
n five years differs from now in a very positive way due to all
changes, innovations, content modifications, and strategies that will be created to meet our
students’ and the new generations’ ex
pectations of the modern world.

Technology has

demonstrated that it is
an impo
rtant instrument in our society
applicable not only in education,
but most fields.

Change is happening;
we are experiencing the process.

To predict or visualize
the FEA in five years
a scenario

will be created

following
th
e
Von Reibnitz (1988, 1992), Schwab, Cerutti and Von Reibnitz (2003) scenario type, defined as
“A scenario approach involves developing future environment situations (scenarios) and
describing the path from any given present to these future situations” (p.

231).

FUTURE VISION

OF EDUCATION


5


1
-

A goal: To pursue a higher education, participate in training and

professional
development, and i
ncorporate the most
technology
that is possible
.

2
-

Influence, analysis: Request necessary materials that help meet my goal, involving
parents, colleagues
and administrators.

3
-

Projections: Raise funds following the school and district requirements and also analyze
previous experiences and ideas.

4
-

Clustering alternatives: Participate in professional developments and trainings. If
classroom coverage is not provi
ded, then find and register for courses available online.

5
-

Scenario interpretation, development, visualization: Put in practice all content learned
incorporating high technology for learning, teaching, and exchanging experiences with
my co
-
workers. I will train colleagues if necessary, so all students will benefit

from
accessible technology in classrooms and schools.

6
-

Consequence analysis (opportunities, risks, action): Have a plan B created that will not
affect my goal or my futuring. Other scenarios will be accessible to decrease risks, take

the opportunities whe
n presented, and make good decisions.

7
-

Analysis of disruptive events, wild cards: If professional developments, trainings, and
technology tools are not available, that is why clustering alternative
s

were created.
Therefore, I would educate myself by accessi
ng online courses that best address my
interests and expectations.

8
-

Developing core strategies, monitoring system: Future scenarios will be considered using
this present as the past, the next coming years as the present and develop
the
future
environment sc
enarios in order to let the best future happen.

Future Vision

FUTURE VISION

OF EDUCATION


6


Classrooms

provided with technology too
ls permit students and teachers
access to online
environments, software, e
-
books,
and virtual technology
.

Teachers will be trained to gain the
necessary
techno
logy skills to incorporate
technology in the lessons enabling students to access
instruction through this powerful source.

Why Classrooms should be presented in this Way

Educational institutions’
missions focus

on students’ learning.
C
lassrooms are

the
primary setting to deliver

instruction

and
to prepare
students for

the

new modern world.
Technology has revolutionized, guided, and impacted our society.

Incorporating technology in
our classrooms, at all educational levels,
should be a priority.
Computers, telecommunications,
multimedia, internet, space exploration, industrialization,
and
discoveries are
the
technologies
that are
available today. Based on all changes our

society has experienced
during
the
past years
and the present, future scena
rios should be created to respond diverse point of views, possible,
and expected experiences.

Goal and Scenarios

Pursui
ng higher education, participating
in professional develop
ment, trainings, and
incorporating

the most technology possible in the classro
om
is the goal for

five years from now.
To master the goal, a plan is crucial due to all factors that could intervene or affect the process.

Ute von Reibnitz

(
1988)

argues that, “the ability to create different futures allows planners to
deal with scenarios that fall between two extremes
” (p.

228)
.

Even
people
who r
efuse the way
our world advance
s

should

become familiar with
it somehow.

Creating future scenarios to

be
ready for expected and unexpected situations could help decrease risks, take the opportuniti
es
when presented, and make better

decisions.

FUTURE VISION

OF EDUCATION


7


First, participation in educational trainings and pursuing a higher education are essential
aspects to take into

consideration
.
Professional development and trainings are mostly provided
during school hours. Unfortunately funds for temporary instructors are not always available,
affecting teachers’ participation.

Alternative strategies should be considered such a
s online
courses, webinars, and professional developments available in the evenings or during the
weekends.

Second is the budget

which is
a difficult topic t
o address.
Considering all the damage the
economy has faced during the last years, schools’ budget
s’ limitations are understandable.
Alternate choices such as fundraisings, grants, and donations could be considere
d while creating
scenarios.
Review fundraising ideas from past years and consider the most updated rules and
requirements approved for fundraising purposes.

The t
hird

one

is technology, a pri
ority in all scenarios. Providing

classrooms with the
highest technology tools
possible to

access

a modified curriculum based on current needs and
future scenarios. Sharing teach
ers’ experiences and ideas, no
forgetting about the basic learning
skills that will

always benefit our students no

matter how o
r what the future brings. Schools
shoul
d teach

safety skills, m
anners, politeness, and
other basic skills using technology to deliver
instruction.

Students’ learning style
s have

changed tremendously due to the advanced technology.

Students talk

about “new apps”, social media, text messages, g
ames, and so many other topics.
Technologies such as games and gamification are well accepted.
NMC Horizon R
eport

(2013)
states, “Furthermore, educational game play has proven to increase soft skills in learners, such as
critical thinking, creative proble
m
-
solving, and teamwork.

This idea is the basis of the
relationship between games and
education” (p
.

21).

St
udents play online
games

designed to
FUTURE VISION

OF EDUCATION


8


improve
academic
achievement
.


The Smart B
oard is another tool that encourages students’
interactive participation with the content.

Ta
blets follow lessons, reinforce new content
,

and
provide
learning with innumerable applications of their choo
sing. Wearable technology is a

powerful tool to assi
st students with communication, sensory and vision

skills
.

Changes in Education

Changes in education are happening and technology has become an important resource to
improve and de
velop education’s expectations.
Schools policies are changing regarding mob
ile
devices’ accessibility. According to the
New Media Consortium

(2012)
, “The power of apps,
coupled with the portability of mobile devices, is causing many schools to take another look at
their policies
regarding mobile devices”
. A great response to
this concern, followed by surveys
and studies, is the program BYOD.

S
mart
phones, tablets,
and other mobile computing devices

are more accessible
. Mobile
technolog
y
’ prices have decreased considerably due to their usefulness and positive impact not
only i
n education, but in most arenas.

The increased demand of technologies have been created
Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) program
s

for
students to access academic content through
their own devices.

The Internet permits

interrelated devices,
shares
information
, and
connects
people

all over the world.

Surveys results demonstrate

that online courses permit students to control their own
learning, receive extra help, have access to more courses, access content at any time, and fit
schedules (Blackboard K
-
12 & Proj
ect Tomorrow, 2009).


Teachers’ opinions vary based on
their online teaching experiences. Teachers with online teaching experiences state that online
learning improves students’ understanding, provides more personalized attention, encourages
students to be more self
-
directed,

and facilitates communication among students and educators
FUTURE VISION

OF EDUCATION


9


(Blackboard K
-
12 & Project Tomorrow, 2009)
.

Technology implementation is crucial to offer
on
line learning as well

as trained teachers.

Web 2.0 and learning environments, wikis, and blogs are mobi
le technologies that could
be incorporated into lessons and have awesome potential. These mobile technologies how
people communicate, access information, navigate research sources, produce information and
learn. Digital information is different
from what

is written on paper.
It could be in more than
one place at a time; students and everyday people produce information and media, and people
can work together to increase information.

Budgetary Process in the States

Social redistribution programs and elect
oral restrictions on state revenue collections
create controversies

during the budgetary process.
Legal rules and regulations for classroom
expenditures and allocation of resources limit state legislators’ ability to respond to citizen
de
mands (Wong & Lan
gevin, 2007).
States’ educational programs

should focus on the need to
modify the public school system. Political leaders just need to take action, and consider a policy
reform to reduce the negative impact of

education financial litigation
.

They should

focus

on how
to modify rules and regulations, taking in consideration all the changes and transformations
education is going through.


Public Policies


Wong and Langevin

(
2007)

list citizen ideology and public opinion as some of the
reasons why state lawmakers and local school boards differ in their respon
sibility for public
education.
Adopting charter schools is a political interpretation of a new reform due to the lower
class
rooms expenditures, the lower teacher
-
student ratio, and education financial litigation.


Political parties have considerable influence in the policy process. According to Wong and
FUTURE VISION

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Langevin (2007), “The risk ratio for state adoption of a charter school la
w is nearly three times
higher under

Republican governors compared to Democratic officeholders, suggesting the
political beliefs and policy preferences of state executive leaders shape the legislative
consideration of charter schools as a reform strategy”
(p.462 ). Considering all the information
above, states could prefer the adoption of charter schools legislation rather than public schools.
Charters schools are an alternative, a policy expansion of school choice. Politics and economic
forces interfere

considerably in policy changes.

Taking action is an excellent

answer to all the obstacles the

public school system has
faced for

the past years. B
ringing

good

ideas, being united, and involving our parents, local
leaders, and community membe
rs in the comm
itment to ensure

the s
uccess of students.

Prepare

professionals for a successful implementation of high standards, incorporating technology as an
excellent mediator b
etween learners and content.

Creating
successful pr
ograms and
smart
policies

as well to
let the best future happens
.
The National Education Association

(2013)

supports the Raise
-
Your
-
Hand initiative to help our public schools system succeed in the intent
to preserve one of the beauties our country treasures: public school
s
-

“Students

must have equal
meaningful educational opportunity that prepares them to think critically, solve problems, and
attain global competence”
.

Considering Futuring as an important method to develop strategies and alternate choices
as well as good ideas and pro
grams to benefit students’ achievement standards and accessibility
(BYOD) are important sources to build the transition and let the better future happen.




FUTURE VISION

OF EDUCATION


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References:

Bauer, D. G. (1998). How to make fund raising a learning experience.
Schools In

The Middle,
7
(5), 33
-
35.

Bla
ckboard K
-
12 & Project Tomorrow. (2009).
Learning in the 21
st

century: 2009 trends update
,
p.2
-
6.

Clardy, A. (2011). Six worlds of tomorrow: Representing the future to popular culture.
World
Future Society, 3
(2), 37
-
48.

Croff
, L. & Smoker, P. (1996, October 12). Introduction to future studies
.

Global O
ptions
.
Retrieved from
http://www.csudh.edu/global_options/Default.HTM

Florida Department of Education.

(2010). Common Core State Standards: Classroom resources
.
Retrieved from
https://www.fldoe.org/schools/ccc.asp


Florida Department of Education. (2010). Students FEA. Retrieved from

http://feaweb.org/student
-
florida
-
education
-
association

Johnson, L., Adams Becker, S., and Ludgate, H. (2013).
NMC Horizon r
eport
: 2013 Higher
Education Edition
, pp. 14
-
20

Mietzner, D., & Reger, G. (200
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strategic foresight.
Int. J. Technology Intelligence and Planning

(p.12). Retrieved from
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s/stragegicforesight.pdf

National Education Association. (2013).
Issues & actions: Raise your hand for public education
.
Retrieved from
http://www.nea.org/home/raiseyourhand.html

Sharemyleson

by teacher, for teacher. (2012). About Us. Retrieved from
http://www.sharemylesson.com/article.aspx?storyCode=6000208&navCode=285

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OF EDUCATION


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Sass, Edmund,
D. (2013).
American Ed
ucational History: A Hypertext Timeline
. Retrieved from
http://www.eds
-
resources.com/educationhistorytimeline.html

The Advocate Florida Education Association. (Fall 2013).
Online
Common Core State Standards
resources p.23.

The New Media Consortium. (2012) NMC Horizon project preview: 2012 K
-
12 Edition.
NMC
Horizon Project
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Retrieved from
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est,

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[Presented at the University of
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Langevin, W. E. (2007). Policy
E
xpansion of
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-
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doi:10.1080/01619560701313085







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