Ocean Policy Task Force: Water Quality Objective

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Feb 22, 2014 (3 years and 5 months ago)

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National Water Quality Monitoring Council

Herndon, VA

15 July 2010



Ocean Policy Task Force: Water Quality Objective




Jawed Hameedi

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Silver Spring, MD

1

Ocean Policy Task Force
--

Overview


Established by President’s memorandum, dated June
12, 2009


The message is to collaborate on ocean
-
related [coasts,
open water, the Great Lakes] issues and work within a
unifying framework


Share knowledge and resources


Coordinate activities


Integrate toward common goals


Communicate

2

Ocean Policy Task Force


Initial Actions


Within 90 days develop recommendations for:


A National Policy


A US Framework for Policy Coordination


An Implementation Strategy


Completed: Interim Report, September 2009


Within 180 days


A recommended framework for effective Coastal and
Marine Spatial Planning


Completed: Draft interim framework, December 2009

3

Ocean Policy Task Force

Nine (9) Priority Objectives

1.
Ecosystem
-
based management

2.
Coastal and marine spatial planning

3.
Inform decisions and improve understanding

4.
Coordinate and support

5.
Resiliency and adaptation to climate change and ocean
acidification

6.
Regional ecosystem protection and restoration

7.
Water quality and sustainable practices on land

8.
Changing conditions in the Arctic

9.
Ocean, coastal and Great Lakes observations and
infrastructure

4

Eight (8) Water Quality Issues: Coastal
waters and the Great Lakes (NWQMN)


Oxygen depletion


Nutrient over
-
enrichment; eutrophication


Toxic contamination


Sedimentation


Harmful Algal Blooms


Habitat degradation (freshwater availability; dredging
impacts; shoreline armoring; etc.)


Invasion by non
-
indigenous species


Pathogens (indicator bacteria)

5

6

Ask me how




Successfully reducing nutrient input to alleviate
eutrophication may be contributing to increased
incidence of botulism in coastal birds, aided by
expanding invasive species

Ocean Policy Task Force: Policy Coordination
Framework [Draft]

National Ocean Council

Principals and Deputies

Co
-
Chairs: CEQ/OSTP

Ocean Resource
Management IPC

Ocean Science and
Technology IPC

Governance
Coordination
Committee

Ocean Research
and Resources
Advisory Panel

Steering Committee

White House
Councils and Offices
(Climate, Economy,
Security, etc.)

IPC= Interagency Policy Committee

Presumptive Framework for Developing
Strategic Action Plan: Water Quality

Strategic Action Planning
Committee

Chair/co
-
Chairs

Staff

Interagency Work Group

(workers, not representatives)

Theme Teams

Leaders

Regional Teams

Leaders

O&C

DI&T

Science

NOC

ORM
-
IPC; OST IPC

NOPC

Governance


13

IOOS


11

CMSP
--

9

Strategic Action Plan


Guidance from NOC; more
specifically from ORM
-
IPC and
OST
-
IPC


Plans
--

one for each objective
--

to
include:


Actionable items


to do list
--

with milestones, performance
measures, and likely outcomes;


Small
-
scale and incremental
opportunities to build upon
existing activities;


Key lead and participating
agencies;


Information gaps and needs in
science and technology; and


Resource requirements and steps
for collaboration (current and out
-
year budgets)


Also SWOT analysis


9

Threat

Weakness

Strength

Opportunity

Apathy

toward the goal

Commitment

to achieving the goal

Agency

requirements

External

needs

Actionable
Items


examples

i.
Identify contaminants of concern and their sources within the
watershed

ii.
Document the nature, severity and putative cause(s) of water
quality
-
related problems, e.g., seafood consumption advisories,
habitats degradation (hypoxia, eutrophication, and shoreline
alteration), toxins and infectious agents, and economic losses

iii.
Estimate contaminant
input to the watershed and loading from the
watershed (and airshed) to the receiving body

iv.
Develop methods and technologies to quantify transport,
transformation and fate of contaminants in the watershed and
receiving waters

v.
Recommend and provide decision
-
support tools for more effective
conservation practices and use efficiencies for improving water
quality and
quantity

vi.
Provide the knowledge and tools for monitoring the status and
trends
of water
quality and assessing watershed
condition

10

Focus on “nonpoint” pollution sources


Agriculture


nutrients, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, sediment


Forestry


pesticides, sediment, temperature


Hydromodifcation and habitat alteration


channelization, dams, beach
armoring


sediment, contaminants, hydrology


Ports, marina and boating


petroleum hydrocarbons, solid waste, sediment,
fish processing waste,
boat
cleaning,
antifouling chemicals, and coastal
armoring


Roads, highways and bridges


heavy metals, oils, sediments,
etc.


Urban areas


sediments, oils, fertilizers, pharmaceuticals, toxic metals and
chemicals, thermal pollution, road salt, viruses and other
pathogens


Regional emissions and deposition of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and
ammonia


Wetland and riparian management


thermal pollution,
nutrients,
contaminants, sediments, etc.


Abandoned mine drainage


e.g., acidic waters with high metal content


11

Other pollution sources cannot be ignored


Municipal wastewater discharge


Industrial effluents and plumes


Smokestacks


power plants, factories and
ships


does
a ship constitute a point source?


Aquaculture impacts


where does this fit?


Ballast water


where does this fit?


Oil spills


Marine debris


12

NOC organizes

PHASE I (1
-
12 months)

Phase II (9
-
24 months)

Phase III (18 monhts
-
5 years)

NOC Strategic Action Plan

Scientific guidance and information mgmt plan

Fed agency
coordination

Implement
regional steps

Coordinate with
states; workshops

Capacity
assessment

Work plan to
NOC

Plan implementation, reviews, feedback

Governance
Adv Comm

Funding and
support

Regional
planning
bodies
formed

Strawman phased implementation plan

Key federal partners


NOAA


EPA


US Forest Service


Agriculture Research Service


US Geological Survey


National Park Service


US F&WS Coastal Program


US Army Corps of Engineers


14


Thank You



For more information:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ceq ...

http://www.cmsp.noaa.gov


Your comments and suggestions are welcome

Jawed.Hameedi@noaa.gov

15

Strawman Plan


Objective


Water Quality and Sustainable Practices on Land:
Enhance water quality in the ocean, along our coasts,
and in the Great Lakes by promoting and
implementing sustainable practices on land

16

Performance
Measures


Develop and transfer
technology and
implement
practices
to reduce delivery of contaminants from the
watershed to coastal waters, and document water
quality improvements:


Initial: demonstration
of technologies, practices and
improvements in at least one of
nine regions


Cumulative: demonstration
of technologies, practices
and improvements in each of
nine regions

17

Key
Measurable Outcomes


Improved
water quality as demonstrated by reduced
accumulation of contaminants in the environment and
sentinel biota,
improvements in eutrophication
and
hypoxic conditions, recovery
of natural habitat and
biodiversity, and enhanced economic benefits


[
Note: in the context of “ecosystem
-
based”
management, regional differences are acknowledged, so
the outcomes will relate to
specific water quality
-
related issues or scientific questions in a particular
study area].


18

NOAA does not develop regulations for toxic
substances or water quality criteria


Regulations


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)


Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)


Food and Drug Administration (FDA)


Recommendations or guidelines [cannot be enforced by
law]


Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR)


National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)


NOAA, e.g. Sediment Quality Guidelines

19

20

NOAA’s Water
Quality Data Needs


Establishing connections
between water [and air]
quality and undesirable
ecosystem conditions or
outcomes (e.g.,
nuisance or harmful
algal blooms,
eutrophication, fish
diseases and
deformities, hypoxic
conditions, and loss of
species, habitats
and
biodiversity)

21

Water Quality Data Needs


contd.


Understanding the
role of physical
processes (including
episodic events,
decadal changes, and
global warming) on
coastal and Great
Lakes ecosystems.

Loading from a Runoff Event in Chesapeake Bay, March 2008
(High
-
Resolution Ocean Color Satellite Data)
http://coastwatch.noaa.gov/

TSS

Chl

22

Water Quality Data Needs


contd.


Fostering
collaboration
between NOAA,
universities, and
states


Enhancing
environmental
literacy (through
education, outreach
and training)

Impervious surface area; ISAT;
Rutgers COOL; Teachers at Sea

23

NOAA’s approach: Healthy Coastal Ecosystems


NOAA will use the full range
of its capabilities (research,
assessment, monitoring,
management , technology
transfer, education and
outreach) to achieve:


Greater understanding of
interactions among the
components of healthy
coastal ecosystems


Designing and implementing
management solutions that
are comprehensive,
integrated and
geographically focused over
a variety of time scales


Synthesizing and
communicating information
to coastal decision
-
makers
and stakeholders