Report protocol: - Prairie Lakes Area Education Agency

jockeyropeInternet and Web Development

Feb 2, 2013 (4 years and 5 months ago)

118 views

Data Retreat Report

Goal 2: Learning Supports


Contact: Linda Linn, Lorie Spanjers, Theresa Golden

Retreat Date:
June

2008

Groups involved in the report:
Learning Supports Team


Key Question

Analyses Conducted

Summary of Findings

Are we where we want to be

at
this point in time? If not, what
seems to be the main
problem(s)?

What do we need to change to
improve the progress we are
making?

1.b.1. To what extent are we
improving the safety and security
of learning environments for all
learners?

o

AEA 8
suspen
sion/expulsion
rates

o

AEA 8 average Drop Out Rate

o

AEA 8 average Graduation
Rate


2006
-
07 Data:



The rate of out
-
of
-
school
suspensions in AEA 8
schools is considerably lower
than the state average. The
data for AEA 8 appears to be
relatively stable while the

state average appears to be
trending upward (04
-
05
through 06
-
07).



The rate of expulsions in
AEA 8 schools is comparable
to the state average.



The average drop out rate for
grades 7


N2 楮 AbA 8 楳
N.4┠%s瑡瑥t慶敲慧攠㴠
N.57┩% Th攠慶敲慧攠drop
ou琠t慴a

for gr慤敳‹


N2 楮
AbA 8 楳 2.0┠%s瑡瑥t慶敲ag攠
㴠2.P┩%



The graduation rate of AEA 8
schools ranges form 81.1% to
100%. Six AEA 8 schools
fall below the state average of
90.5% (Algona, Alta, Fort
Dodge, Prairie Valley, Storm
Lake, Webster City).




The graduation rate needs to
increase in AEA 8 schools.
What is the standard that we
should try to achieve? Is
100% graduation rate
realistic, or even possible?



We do not have access to all
of the data we need.




Through Key Survey, we
created a Climate/C
ulture
Survey that can be
administered annually. The
survey will be piloted with
some of the AEA 8 schools
during the 2008
-
09 school
year.



We are waiting for the State
Data Warehouse to go online
and are hoping that the
warehouse will provide
access to da
ta sources that we
currently do not have.

1.b.2. How well are
action plans
being implemented for Goal 2,
and what are the results of our
activities?

o

School
-
Wide PBS



Twenty
-
five schools have
participated in SW
-
PBS
training.



Out of 48 public school
district
s, schools from 15
different districts and 1
residential treatment facility


We would like to continue to
expand the implementation of
SW
-
PBS across the agen
cy.



We need to find an efficient
and effective way of letting
schools know about SW
-
PBS.



Perhaps we need to talk with
AEA building reps and the
School Improvement
Consultants in January and
February. We could review
the types of data that indicate
the ne
ed for SW
-
PBS. This
have participated in the three
year training cycle of SW
-
PBS.



During 2007
-
08, teams of 3 to
16 attended SW
-
PBS training
sessions.



During 2007
-
08, three PBS
coaches meetings were he
ld,
with an average attendance of
16 per session.



Data from the Team
Implementation Checklists
and the School Evaluation
Tool indicate that once
schools have completed the
three year SW
-
PBS training
cycle, they are able to sustain
their SW
-
PBS efforts.



The
re is high variability
across PBS schools with
regard to number of office
referrals, number of days of
in
-
school suspension and the
number of days of out
-
of
-
school suspension


could then be discussed
during IDASP planning
sessions.



As SW
-
PBS expands to other
schools, we need to continue
to train AEA staff to support
these efforts (SET observers,
PBS coaches, SWIS
facilitators).

o

Early Childhood PBS



12 pre
-
schools have been
trained in program
-
wide PBS



7 AEA staff have been trained
and are providing support for
early childhood programs
that are implementing PBS.




We would like to have all pre
-
schools within the AEA to
obtain training in EC
-
PBS.
The training
process has just
begun across the state.



We would like to have all
Home Intervention personnel
trained and able to utilize the
early intervention PBS
model. This training is just
beginning at the state level.



We are continuing to build
training capacity a
t the AEA
level in regard to early
childhood PBS programs.

o

Teen Screen



Six schools participated in
Teen Screen during 2007
-
08.



Fifteen

students
were
identified as at
-
risk

&
referred for
evaluation/counseling



We are slowly increasing the
number of schools

involved.



AEA staff and representatives
from community mental
health agencies must
collaborate in order to
implement Teen Screen.



Continue to make
schools/AEA
reps/community reps aware
of the availability of
TeenScreen.

o

Wraparound



100% of social workers

trained as facilitators



Building Reps are not all
aware of the availability of


Need to provide overview of
Wraparound Process to
Wraparound facilitators in
the Agency.

building reps, targeting PBS
Schools

o

Framework of Poverty, Ruby
Payne





5 AEA staff m
embers sent for
training



AEA staff provided overview
of Framework of Poverty on
May 2, 2008



AEA 8 Poverty Data
Worksheet was distributed at
May staff meeting



3 schools have requested
training or expressed interest
in the Ruby Payne
Framework of Poverty



We

would like to have some
time to collaborate with the
content specialist
(math/science/literacy) in
order to emphasis and
incorporate strategies that
work for students from
poverty in the academic
area as well as in the
behavioral domain.



Meeting time wit
h content
specialists and written
strategies to share, perhaps
to add to our AEA’s
website.

o

Love & Logic



Capacity building: six AEA
staff members sent for
training



A PPT was developed and is
available in Documents
Manager under Learning
Supports



We woul
d like to have at least
one teacher training and one
parent training offered in
each zone.



With the increase in the
number of people to offer
trainings in Love & Logic,
we anticipate that our goal
will be reached.

o

Olweus Bullying Prevention





6 schools

have requested
training or the Olweus
Bullying Prevention Program



Results of post
-
implementation surveys??



We may need additional
staff trained in Olweus.
The blending of Olweus
with PBS is a natural fit
and, with last year’s Safe
School Legislation, ,ma
y be
important for DE site visits.



The state is considering an
additional training this fall.
Trainers are only supposed
to work with two buildings
at once.

o

Crisis Intervention



A PPT was developed and is
available in Documents
Manager under Learning
Sup
ports



A training manual is in the
process of being developed.



The biggest hurdle is staff
availability to accomplish the
anticipated outcomes: create
a training manual, develop a
crisis plan for the Agency,
and provide training for
school districts.





o

Le
arning Supports Web Page



Sections of the web page have
been developed in draft form.
None are currently active.



A barrier to completion of the
Learning Supports section of
the AEA web page is lack of
staff time to develop the
content.







Areas of stren
gth



The Learning Supports team has been able to impact schools with very few people provided time in their contracts to do so.



Learning Supports has been able to engage in non
-
team members in initiatives promoted by the Learning Supports team. We have wor
ked to broaden the AEA’s capacity to
support our schools in climate/culture issues.



31% of AEA public school districts have one or more schools engaged in School
-
Wide Positive Behavior Supports.



The majority of AEA 8 schools have a graduation rate that is
higher than the state average.



The average drop out rate for AEA 8 schools is lower than the state average, both 7
-
12 and 9
-
12.



Out
-
of
-
school suspension rates are lower than the state average; expulsion rates are comparable to the state average.



There is a
n increased interest from schools in Framework of Poverty and Olweus training.



A Learning Supports strand was incorporated into the High School Redesign sessions held during the 2007
-
08 school year.



Sessions related to Learning Supports were provided duri
ng the Middle School Redesign team trainings during the 2007
-
08 school year.



Ar
eas of concern



Lack of FTE assigned to Learning Supports (currently two people at .2 FTE each). Other AEAs have from 1 to 2 FTE assigned
to Learning Supports.



It may not
be possible to continue to expand Learning Supports efforts with the current structure due to lack of time and availability o
n the part of AEA staff.



Need to expand the Framework of Poverty training team’s capacity to facilitate the poverty simulation comp
onent.



No state funding for Learning Supports (good news: now have a state consultant for Learning Supports and, beginning August 8,

a consultant for Positive Behavior Supports).



Continual concern about lack of accurate and timely data.



Summary and con
clusions




Recommended steps/actions

(to be completed at Data Retreat)