LCHS School Renewal Plan

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Feb 2, 2013 (4 years and 9 months ago)

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1


S
CHOOL

RENEWAL PLANS

COVER PAGE (Required)


School Name: Lake City High School School

Telephone
: 843
-
374
-
3321


School

Address
:

PO Drawer 1569


Lake City, SC 29560


District Contact
: Barbara Woodbury
Telephone
: 843
-
374
-
8562



E
-
mail:
bwoodbury@florence3.k12.sc.us
,
kfeagin@florence3.k12.sc.us




Assurances

The
school renewal plan, or annual

update of the of the school renewal plan,

include
s

components required by the Early Childhood Development and Academic
A
ssistance Act of 1993
(Act 135) and the Education Accountability Act of 1998 (EAA) (S.C. Code Ann.

§§59
-
18
-
1300 and 59
-
139
-
10 et seq.
(Supp. 2004)). The signatures of the chairperson of the
board of trustees, the superintendent,
the principal,
and the
chairperson of the School
Improvement Council

are affirmation of active participation of key stakeholders and alignment
with Act 135 and E
AA requirements.



Required Printed Names and Signatures


Chairperson, Board of Trustees



____________________



____________________



_______________




Printed Name

Signature

Date



Superintendent



____________________



____________________



_______________



Printed Name

Signature

Date



School Principal



____________________



____________________



_______________




Printed Name

Signature

Date



Chairperson, Schoo
l Improvement Council



____________________



____________________



_______________




Printed Name

Signature

Date


Year

______



5
-
Year Plan


SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School




2


STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT FOR
SCHOOL

PLANS

(Mandated Component)



List the name
s

of persons who were involved in the development of the school renewal plan.
A participant for each numbered category
is required.




Position

Name


1.

Principal

Kasey Miles Feagin

2.

Teacher

Lacie Ward

3.

Parent/Guardian

Karen Cooper

4.

Community Member

Michelle Daniels

5.

School Improvement Council

Cassandra Gillard

6.

Others*


(May include school board members, administrators School
Imp
rovement Council members, students, PTO members, agency
representatives, university partners, etc.)



Position

Name


Board Member Diane Smith


Assistant Principal



Jennifer Odom



Media Sp
ecialist Ella Plummer


Intervention Specialist



Jefferson Henneghan


Master Teacher



Kristi Anderson



Master Teacher



Trud
y Norris


Master Teacher Cheri Turbeville


Master Teacher Amishacoe Fulmore

_



*

R
EMINDER
:

If state or federal gran
t applications require representation by other stakeholder
groups, it is appropriate to include additional stakeholders to meet those requirements and
to ensure that the plans are aligned.



SCHOOL NAME



Lake City High School


3



SACS Accreditation/High Schools That Work Teams
I. Vision and Purpose

II. Governance and Leadership

III. Teaching

and Learning

(Curriculum & Instructional
Focus Team


HSTW)

Assistant Principal

Principal

Principal

CATE Department

Master Teachers

Master Teachers


Math Department

English Department










IV. Documenting and Using
Results

(Data & Assessment

Focus Team


HSTW)

V. Resources and Support
Systems

(Student Support

Focus Team
-

HSTW)

VI. Stakeholders
Communications
and
Relationships

(Parent Involvement & Support
Focus Team


HSTW)

Principal

Assistant Principal

Guidance Department

Master Teachers

Media Specialist

Assistant Principal

Science Department

Fine Arts & Foreign Language
Department

Receptionists

& Office Staff



Attendance Clerk



Special Education Department







VII. Commitment to Continuous

Improvement





Assistant Principal





Physical Education/ ROTC
Department





Social Studies Department

















SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


4


ASSURANCES FOR SCHOOL
RENEWAL
PLANS

(Mandated Component)

Act 135 Assurances

Assurances, checked and signed by the p
rincipal, attest that the district complies with all applicable
Act 135 requirements.


NA

Academic Assistance, PreK

3




The school makes special

efforts to assist children in PreK

3 who demonstrate a need for
extra or alternative instructional attention

(e.g., after
-
school homework help centers,
individual tutoring, and group remediation).



Academic Assistance, Grades 4

12



The school makes special

efforts to assist children in grades 4

12 who demonstrate a need
for extra or alternati
ve instructional attention (e.g., after
-
school homework help centers,
individual tutoring, and group remediation).



Parent Involvement



The school encourages and assists parents in becoming more involved in their children’s
education. S
ome
examples of parent involvement initiatives include making special efforts to
meet with parents at times more convenient for them,
providing parents with their child’s
individual test results and an interpretation of the results, providing parents with
information
on the district’s curriculum and assessment program, providing frequent, two way
communication between home and school, providing parents an opportunity to participate on
decision making groups,

designating space in schools for parents to acces
s educational
resource materials, including parent involvement expectations as part of the principal’s and
superintendent’s evaluations, and providing parents with information pertaining to
expectations held for them by the school system, such as ensuring
attendance and
punctuality of their children.



Staff Development



The school provides staff development training for teachers and administrators in the
teaching techniques and strategies needed to implement the district plan for the
imp
rovement of student academic performance. The staff development program reflects
requirements of Act 135, the EAA, and the National Staff Development Council’s revised
Standards for Staff Development
.



Technology



The
school

integrat
es

technology into professional
development, curriculum development,

and classroom instruction to improve teaching and

learning.




Innovation



The school uses innovation funds for innovative activities to improve student learning and
acce
lerate the performance of all students. Provide a good example of the use of innovation
funds.



SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


5




Recruitment


The district makes s
pecial and intensive efforts to
recruit

and give
priority
to serving those
parents or guardians of children,

ages birth through five years, who are considered at
-
risk of
school failure. “At
-
risk” children are defined as those whose school readiness is jeopardized
by any of, but not limited to, the following personal or family situation(s): Educational level
of p
arent below high school graduation, poverty, limited English proficiency, significant
developmental delays, instability or inadequate basic capacity within the home and/or
family, poor health (physical, mental, emotional), and/or child abuse and neglect.



Collaboration


The school (regardless of the grades served) collaborates
with health and human services
agencies (e.g., county health departments, social services departments, mental health
departments, First Steps, and the family court
system).



Developmental Screening



The school
ensures that the young child receives all services necessary for growth and
development. Instruments are used to assess physical, social, emotional, linguistic, and
cognitive developmental le
vels. This program normally is appropriate at primary and
elementary schools, although screening efforts could take place at any location.


NA

Half
-
Day Child Development



The

school provides h
alf
-
day child development programs for
four
-
year
-
olds

(some dis
tricts
fund full
-
day programs). The programs usually function at primary and elementary schools,
although they may be housed at locations with other grade levels or completely separate
from schools.



NA

Developmentally Appropriate Curriculum for PreK

3



The school
ensures that the scope and sequence of the curriculum for PreK
-
3 are appropriate
for the maturation levels of students. Instructional practices accommodate individual
differences in maturation level and take into account the student's social and

cultural
context.



Parenting and Family Literacy



The
school

provides a four component program that integrates all of the following activities:
interactive literacy activities between parents and

their

Children

(Interactive Literacy
A
ctivities); training for parents regarding how to be the primary teachers for their children
and full partners in the education of their children (parenting skills for adults, parent
education); parent literacy training that leads to economic self
-
sufficie
ncy (adult education);
and an age
-
appropriated education to prepare children for success in school and life
experiences (early childhood education). Family Literacy is not grade specific, but generally
is most appropriate for parents of children at the pri
mary and elementary school levels and
below, and for secondary school students who are parents. Family Literacy program goals
are to strengthen parent involvement in the learning process of preschool children ages birth
through five years; promote school r
eadiness of preschool children; offer parents special
opportunities to improve their literacy skills and education, a chance to recover form
dropping out of school; and identify potential developmental delays in preschool children by
offering developmental

screening.









SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


6



Coordination of Act 135 Initiatives with Other Federal, State, and District Programs



The district
ensures as much program effectiveness as possible by developing a district
wide/school wide coordinated effort among al
l programs and funding. Act 135 initiatives are
coordinated with programs such as Head Start, First Steps, Title I, and programs for
students with disabilities.





________________________________
____



_____________________


Signature of Superintendent


Date



________________________________
____



_____________________


Sig
nature of Principal


Date



SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


7


TABLE OF CONTENTS (
Mandated Component)





Cover Page


1



Stakeholders

2



Assurances

4


Table of Contents

7



Executive Summary of Needs Assessment


8



Data Summary


11



Mission, Vision, and Beliefs

14



Scientifically Based Research

15



Plan Summary: Student Achievement

20


Plan Summary: Teacher/Administrator Quality

3
5


Plan Summary: School Climate

38




SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


8


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF NEEDS ASSESSMENT FINDINGS

(Mandated Component)



Needs Assessment Narrative and Documents:



1.) Lake City High School is located in Lake City, Sou
th Carolina
, and serves
approximately 920

students in grades nine through twelve. The population is 68% African
American, 31% Caucasian, and less than 1% Hispanic. Approximately 72% of Lake City
High School student
s

qualify for free/ reduced lunch. Twen
ty percent of our students are
classified as disabled. The high poverty and disability count
s

attribute to achievement
levels.




2.) In the spring 2009
, the state mandated HSAP was administered to all second year
high school students. The HSAP data
indicated that Lake City High School did not meet
Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) in the area
s

of all students for English/Language Arts
and

Mathematics.



3.) The
No Child Left Behind Act
’s expectations set criteria for Lake City High School
.
Approxim
ately 57.5
% did not perform at the Proficient or Advanced levels on the HS
AP
English
-
Language Arts in 2009
. Of those that did not make Proficient or Advanced,
74.9
%
were students with disabilities.



4.) Approximately 49
% of Lake City High School stude
nts who were tested did not
perform at the Proficient or Advanced levels on HSAP Mathematics. Of those that did not
m
ake Proficient or Advanced, 63.1
% were students with disabilities.



5.) Lake City High School’s gra
duation rate decreased from
81.1% to 6
9.2%.

This is
due to the fact many of our students who transferred to Adult Education were added back into
our number.



6.) Lake City High School’s average
scores on End
-
of
-
Course Exams in
crease
d in all
subjects except English
. The percent of students s
coring 70 or above on each of the EOC
test
s were

as follows: Al
gebra I
-

46.2% , English I


40.5%, Physical Science


36.5
%

and
US History and Constitution


27.0%
. The overall percentage of student
s

scoring 70
or
above for all subjects was 37.6
%.



7.)
As reported in our 2008 South Carolina

Report
card, our annual dropout rate
decreased from 9.8% to 2
.0%.



8.) The 2008

Absolute rating on the Sou
th Carolina State Report card increased from
Average in 2007 to Good
. The Im
provement rating
decreased from
E
xcellent to Good
,

but
we did receive a Palmetto Silver Award for School Improvement and Closing the
Achievement Gap
. The school
also met

Adequate Yearly Progress

in 2008 by meeting 17
out of 17 indicators
.



9.) T
here is a
gap between African
-
American
and white students who scored Proficient
or Advanced on HSAP

for the 2009 school year. There were 71.7
% of white students who
scored Proficient

or Advanced on ELA HSAP in 2009
. African
-
American students who
scored Proficient or A
dvanced on HSAP ELA total
ed 32.8% in 2009. There were 73.3
% of
white students who scored Proficient or Advanced on Math HSAP. African
-
American


SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


9


students who scored Proficient
or Advanced on Math totaled 42.6% in 2009
. HSAP data
also revealed a gap between male and female p
opul
ations in ELA with only 39.1
% of males
scoring Profic
ient or Advanced levels and 46.8
% of females scorin
g Proficient or Advanced in
2009
. The gender gap in HSAP

Math was even greater with 45.7
% of males scoring
Profic
ient or Advanced levels and 57.8
% of fe
males scorin
g Proficient or Advanced in 2009
.



10) Parent, teacher, and st
udent surveys indicate that 81.1
% of parents are satisfied
with the learning environment at Lake City High Scho
ol while teachers indicated 88.7
%
satisfac
tion and students indicated
53.6
% satisfaction. The
surveys also indicated that
73.8% of parents, 91.6
% of
teachers, and 60.8
% of students are satisfied with the social and
physical environment at Lake City High School. Students

(78.3%) and parents (78.7%)

are
satisfied
with home
-
s
chool relations, yet only 69
% of teachers are satisfied with home
-
school
relations.



11) The School Improvement Council meets
monthly

to monitor and evaluate the
status of the School Improvement Plan and make needed recommendations.




AREAS OF STREN
GTH



HSAP passage rate for second year students passing two subtest increased from
58.1% in 200
8

to 61.9% in 200
9
.



Percentage of students passing no subtest on HSAP decreased from 21.8% in 200
8

to 17.7% in 200
9
.



Performance objectives were met by white stud
ents on HSAP ELA.



Performance objectives were met by white students on HSAP Math.




Lake City High School’s 2009 graduates received close to $1,595,000 in
scholarships including $365,300 for awards, $1,160,000 in Life Scholarships and
$68,000 in Hope Scho
larships.



Fifty
-
eight students qualified for the Life scholarship and twenty
-
six students qualified
for the Hope Scholarship in 200
9
.



Five seniors attained a score better than 1100 on the SAT or 24 on the ACT in 200
9
.


AREAS IN NEED OF IMPROVEMENT



Perform
ance objectives were not met by African American students on HSAP ELA
or Math for 2009.



Performance objectives were not met by students with disabilities on HSAP ELA or
Math for 2009.



Performance objectives were not met by students on subsidized meals on H
SAP
ELA or Math for 2009.



The school met only 12 out of 21 objectives for AYP in 2009.



Graduation rate decreased from 81.1% to 69.2%.

This is due to the fact many of our
students who transferred to Adult Education were added back into our number.



Percentag
e of students passing EOC test was 37.6% in 2009.







SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


10



PRIORITY ACTIONS BASED ON NEEDS ASSESSMENT



The Leadership Team will continue to work through our Teacher Advancement
Program to focus all adults on the improvement of student achievement.



Establis
h an instructional focus for the school
-
wide program which creates an
atmosphere of high expectations for all staff members and students in improving the
academic achievement of all students.



Use MAP test
s

as a benchmark for our disabled population and us
e the Descartes to
identify skills not mastered. Teachers will diagnostically teach these skills




Use progress monitoring system to monitor the academic progress of our disabled
students.



Continue to diagnostically teach students in our small focus grou
p sessions to better
meet the needs of our African American students



Use MAP tests to determine milestones of measurable and achievable progress.
Regular student and teacher goal
-
setting sessions will be held to regularly monitor
students’ academic progre
ss on MAP benchmarks, HSAP assessment
s
, interim
reports, and quarterly report cards.









SCHOOL NAME



Lake City High School


11



SCHOOL NAME



Lake City High School


12






SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


13





































SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


14




Our Mission


The mission of Lake City High School is to graduate students


who are equipped with the tool
s necessary to achieve success.



Our Vision



Our vision is to create a school culture that exhibits:



High expectations for all students



A relevant, rigorous and an engaging curriculum



Positive relationships between all stakeholders



A safe, student
-
cent
ered learning environment


Our Beliefs

We believe that all students, staff and stakeholders should:




Be dedicated to the school’s mission, vision and beliefs



Show respect for themselves, others and the community



Never make excuses



Be tolerant of others



A
lways have a positive attitude



Strive for excellence














SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


15





Scientifical
ly Based Research


1) Character Education


Otten, E.H. (September, 2000).
Character education
. ERIC Digest (ED444932). Bloomington, IN: ERIC
Clearinghouse for Social S
tudies/Social Science Education. Available:

http://www.ericfacility.net/ericdigests/ed444932.html



Schaps, E., Schaeffer, E.F., & McDonnell, S.N. (September 12, 2001).
What’s ri
ght and wrong in character
education today.

Education Week on the Web
, 21(02), 40, 44. Available:
http://www.edweek.org/ew/newstory.cfm?slug=02schaps.h21


2) Classroom Management

Co
tton, K. (December 1990).
School
-
wide and classroom discipline.

Close
-
Up No. 9. Portland, OR: Northwest
Regional Educational Laboratory. Available:
http://www.nwrel.org/scpd/sirs/5/cu9.html



Starr. L. (2002).
Creating a climate for learning: Effective classroom management techniques.

Education World
.
Available:
http://www.education
-
world.com/a_curr/curr155.shtml




ERIC Clearinghouse on Handicapped and Gifted Children (1990).
Managing inappropriate behavior in the
classroom
.
ERIC Digest

#E408 (ED371506).
Reston, VA: Author. Available:
http:
//www.ericfacility.net/ericdigests/ed371506.html

3) Computer
-
aided Instruction



Chaika, G. (August 2, 1999).
Technology in the schools: It does make a difference!


Education World
. Available:
http://www.education
-
world.com/a_admin/admin122.shtml



Kosakowski, J. (June, 1998).
The benefits of information technology
.
ERIC Digest

(ED420302). Syracuse,
NY: ERIC Clearinghouse on Information and Technology. Availabl
e:
http://www.ericfacility.net/ericdigests/ed420302.html



Mann, D., Shakeshaft, C., Becker, J., & Kottkamp, R. (1999).
West Virginia story: Achievement gains from a
statewid
e comprehensive instructional technology program
. Santa Monica, CA: Milken Family Foundation.
Available:
http://www.mff.org/pubs/ME155.pdf


4) Conflict Resolution




SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


16



Abner, J.W., Brown, J.L., & He
nrich, C.C. (1999).
Teaching conflict resolution: An effective school
-
based
approach to violence prevention.

New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty. Available:
http:
//www.esrnational.org/lantieri/pdfs/rccptext.pdf



College of Education, University of Florida (August, 2002).
Conflict resolution/peer mediation (CR/PM) research
project.

Gainesville, FL: Author. Available:
http://www.coe.ufl.edu/CRPM/results.htm

5) Cooperative Learning



California Department of Education (January, 2003).
Cooperative learning: Response to diversity.

Sacramento,
CA: Author. Available:
http://www.cde.ca.gov/iasa/cooplrng2.html



U.S. Department of Education, Southwest Educational Development Laboratory

(Fall, 1998).
Cooperative
learning
.
Classroom Compass
, 1(2). Austin, TX: Eisenhower Southwest C
onsortium for the Improvement of
Mathematics and Science Teaching.
Available:
http://www.sedl.org/scimath/compass/V01n02/welcome.html

6) Curriculum
Alignement



Liebling, C.R
. (November, 1997).
Achieving standards
-
based curriculum alignment through mindful teaching.
New York, NY: The New York Technical Assistance Center and The George Washington University Region III
Comprehensive Center. Available:
http://ceee.gwu.edu/teaching_learning/Curalgn3.pdf



Just4Kids. (2001).
Promising practices: How high
-
performing schools in Texas get results.

Austin, TX: Author.
Available:
http://www.just4kids.org/US/pdf/PP_Osummary.pdf


7) Differentiated Instruction


Tomlinson, C.A.

(1999).
The differentiated classroom.


Alexandria, VA:


ASCD. Available:
http://www.ascd.org/



Tomlinson, C.A., & Eidson, C.C.

(2005).

Differentiation in practice:



A

resource guide for differentiating curriculum, Grades 9
-
12.


Alexandria, VA:


ASCD.

Available
:
http://www.ascd.or
g/



Holloway, J.H. (September, 2000).
Research link

preparing teachers for differentiated instruction
.
Educational Leadership
, 58(1). Alexandria, VA: ASCD. Available:
http://www.ascd.org/readingroom/edlead/0009/holloway.html


8) Discipline Program



Barton, P.E., Coley, R.J., & Wenglinsky, H. (1998).
Order in the classroom: Violence, discipline, and student
achievement.

Princeton, NJ: Educational Testing S
ervice. Available:
ftp://ftp.ets.org/pub/res/order.pdf



SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


17



Fitzsimmons, M.K. (1998).
School
-
wide behavioral management systems.

ERIC Digests


#E563 (ED417515). Reston, VA: ERIC Clearinghouse
on Disabilities and Gifted Education.

Available:
http://ericfacilities/ericdigests/ed417515.html

9) Extended
-
Time Instruction


Aronson, J., Zimmerman, J., & Carlos, L. (1998).
Improv
ing student achievement by extending school: Is it just a
matter of time?

San Francisco, CA: WestEd. Available:
http://web.wested.org/online_pubs/timeandlearning/TAL_PV.html



Brown, C.G. (January, 2001).
Extended learning: What are the states doing?

Principal Online
, 80(3).

Alexandria, VA: National Association of Elementary School Principals.
Available:

http://www.naesp.org/comm/p0101a.htm


10
) Instructional Framework (Ruby Payne)



Swan, William W. (2004).
ImHSAP of Ruby Payne’s Instructional Framework on Student Achievement

in East Allen County Schools, Indiana 2001
-
03.

Available:
http://ahaprocess.com/files/EACS.pdf

11
) Parent/Community Involvement


Fuerstein, Abe. 2000. “School Characteristics and Parent Involvement: Influences on Participation in Children’s


Schools.” The Journ
al of Educational Research 94 (September), no. 1: 29
-
40.



U.S. Department of Education (September, 1994).
Strong families strong schools: Building community
partnerships for learning.

Washington, DC: Author. Available:
http://eric
-
web.tc.columbia.edu/npinpdfs/strongfamiliesschools.pdf



U.S. Department of Education (October, 1997).
Family involvement in children’s education: Successful local
approaches.

W
ashington, DC: Author. Available:
http://www.ed.gov/pubs/FamInvolve/



U.S. Department of Education (1993).
Parent involvement at the middle school level.

Washington, DC: Author.
Available:
http://www.middleweb.com/ParntInvl.html


12
) PLATO



Foshay, R. (March, 2002).
An overview of the research base of PLATO software.

Technical Paper 12.
Bloomington, MN: PLATO Learning, Inc.

1
3
) Professional Development




SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


18



Corcoran, T.B. (June, 1995).
Helping teachers teach well: Transforming professional development
.
CPRE
Policy Briefs
. Brunswick, NJ: Consortium for Policy Research in Education.
Available:
http://www.ed.gov/pubs/CPRE/t61/index.html#TOC



Educational Resources Information Center (1995).
Reconceptualizing professional teacher development
.
ERIC
Digest

(ED 383695). Washington, DC: ERIC Clearinghouse

on Teaching And Teacher Education.
Available:
http://www.ericfacility.nte/ericdigests/ed383695.html



Rinji, J. (1996).
Teachers take charge of their learning: Transforming pr
ofessional development for student
success.

Washington, DC: The NEA Foundation for the Improvement of Education. Available:
http://www.nfie.org/publications/takecharge.htm


14
) Standards

Implementation



American Federation of Teachers (2001).
Making standards matter 2001
. Washington, DC: American
Federation of Teachers.
Available:
http://ww
w.aft.org/edissues/standards/MSM2001/downloads/execsummary.pdf



Hammond, L.D., & Ball, D. L. (June, 1997).
Teaching for high standards: What policymakers need to know and
be able to do.

Washington, DC: National Education Goals Panel. Availab
le:
http://www.negp.gov/Reports/highstds.htm



Pattison, C., & Berkas, N. (2000).
Critical issue: Integrating standards into the curriculum.

Portland, OR: North
Central Regional Education
al Laboratory. Available:
http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/content/currclum/cu300.htm


15
) Standards in Practice



The Education Trust.
Standards in practic
e (SIP).

Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved May 28, 2003 from the
World Wide Web:
http://www.edtrust.org/main/main/sip.asp



Gandal, M., & Vranek, J. (Septem

Cotton, K. (December 19
ber, 2
001).
Standards: Here today, here
tomorrow.

Educational Leadership
, 59(1). Available:
http://www.ascd.org/readingroom/edlead/0109/gandal.html


16
) State/District Curriculum (Stan
dards)



Marzano, R., Pickering, D., & Pollock, J. (2001).
Classroom instruction that works: Research
-
based strategies
for increasing student achievement.
Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development
(ASCD).



Patti
son, C., & Berkas, N. (2000).
Critical issue: Integrating standards into the curriculum.

Portland,OR: North
Central Regional Educational Laboratory. Available:
http://w
ww.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/content/currclum/cu300.htm



SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


19



17
)
Teacher Advancement Program

Schacter, John and Thum, Yeow Meng. 2005. “TAPping into High Quality Teachers: Preliminary results from the
Teacher Advancement Program comprehensive school reform.

School Effectiveness and School Improvement
,
Volume
16
, Issue
3
September, pages 327


353.



18
)
Tutoring



Ho
ck, Michael F.; Kim A. Pulvers, Donald Deshler, and Jean B. Schumaker. 2001. “The Effects of an After
-
School
Tutoring Program on the Academic Performance of At
-
Risk Students and Students with LD.” Remedial and Special
Education 22 (May/June), no. 3:172
-
86.

(Annotated citation can be found in ERIC, EJ 627968.)

19
) Parent/Community Involvement



U.S. Department of Education (September, 1994).
Strong families strong schools: Building community
partnerships for learning.

Washington, DC: Author. Availabl
e:
http://eric
-
web.tc.columbia.edu/npinpdfs/strongfamiliesschools.pdf



U.S. Department of Education (October, 1997).
Family involvement in children’s education: Su
ccessful local
approaches.

Washington, DC: Author. Available:
http://www.ed.gov/pubs/FamInvolve/

SCHOOL NAME



Lake City High School


20





SCHOOL RENEWAL PLAN FOR:
Lake City High School 2010
-
15

DATE:
April

2010

Performance Goal Area:


Student Achievement
Teacher/Administrator Quality
School Climate (Parent Involvement, Safe and Healthy Schools,
etc.)
District Priority

PER
FORMANCE
GOAL
:

(desired result of
student learning)

By the year 2014
-
2015, 85% of all students will pass on the first attempt on HSAP in ELA with a
score of 200 or greater.

INTERIM
PERFORMANCE
GOAL:

By the year 2010
-
2011, 74% of all students will pass on
the first attempt on HSAP ELA.

DATA SOURCE(S):

HSAP Scores, MAP Scores, school
-
wide reading/writing formal and informal assessment scores,
PLATO, and Reading Counts

OVERALL MEASURES
:

Average
Baseline

2010*

2011*

2012*

2013*

2014*

2015*

71.4
%


74
%

76
%

79
%

81
%

83
%

85
%

* Represents projections of improvement



SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


21


STRATEGY:

1
)

Teachers will implement
developmentally appropriate South Carolina Standards
in English/Language Arts.


Activity

(List the processes to fully implement the strategy. Include
profession
al development, scientifically based research, academic
assistance, innovation initiatives, parent involvement, technology etc.)

Timeline

Start/En
d Date

Person
Responsible

Estimated
Cost

Funding
Source

(academic assistance,
innovation, retraining,
categori
cal funding,
etc.)

Indicators of
Implementation


Steps for Strategy 1:

1
-
A) Teachers will plan and teach lessons based
on curricula driven by state standards and align
instruction and assessment to the state standards.



1
-
B) Emphasize skill development
in reading and
writing through the integration of reading across
the curriculum. Students will read books based on
their Lexile levels and complete tests and book
reports.



1
-
C) Enhance development in reading, writing, and
research through computer
-
aide
d enrichment such
as PLATO lab
.




1
-
D) Collect writing samples in content areas to track
student progress and use HSAP writing rubric when
grading; use writing benchmarks.


1
-
E) Implement an additional
English/Writing/Reading supplemental period for
stude
nts needing extra assistance as measured by
MAP in Grade 8.



1
-
F) Evening High School program that will address
the academic needs of students based on academic


8/10
-
5/15





8/10
-
5/15





8/10
-
5/15





8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15






11
/10
-


Principal

Teachers




Principal

Teachers




Teachers

Leadership
Team


T
eachers

Leadership
Team


Leadership
Team

Teachers

Guidance


Principal

Asst.
Principals







































Lesson Plans

Long
-
Range
Plans




Reading Counts Test

Reading Logs




PLATO Schedule

&
Reports

Lab schedule



NCS Mentor Program

Results from Writing
Benchmark


Student/Master

Schedule




Student
Report Card
Grades

Student Logs

Schedule



SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


22


needs and classroom grades.

1
-
G) Provide tutoring program to address specific
subgroups of s
tudents and their academic needs.



1
-
H) Implement real world application activities to
strengthen skill development in reading and writing
to include newspaper articles, school anthologies,
and reading to different audiences.



1
-
I) Provide supplementa
l classroom teaching
materials and/or curriculum such as class sets of
novels for each grade level, dictionaries,
thesauruses, etc….) in support of enriched ELA
instruction.




1
-
J) Use HSAP and MAP results to form flexible
grouping and to develop persona
lized learning
plans for students.





1
-
K) Emphasize and incorporate multicultural
reading materials and lessons throughout the year
and across the curriculum.





1
-
L) Increase the number of students passing
English I and exceeding grade level standar
ds in
writing.





1
-
M) Teachers will implement strategies from
weekly cluster meetings.



5/15

8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/
15




8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
8/15




8/10
-
8/15





8/10
-
8/15



Teachers

Leadership
Tea
m

Teachers


Teachers





Teachers
Leadership
Team




Principal

Guidance



Teachers




Leadership
Team

Teachers


Leadership
Team

Teachers



Leadership
Team

Teachers
































Rosters

Schedule

Student Grades



Lesson Pl
ans




Purchase Orders for
Books






Individual MAP Goal
Report

HSAP scores



Lesson Plans


Report Card Grades

EOC Scores



Student Rosters






Purchase Order for
USA Test Prep



SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


23




1
-
N)
Use data generated from diagnostic
assessments (HSAP, MAP, quarterly Benchmarks
(pre and post test assessments), traditional and
non
-
traditional classroom

assessment strategies,
etc…) to target lessons and objectives to meet the
instructional needs to students. Use USA Test
Prep for benchmarks.



Results on
assessments and
benchmarks














SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


24










SCHOOL RENEWAL PLAN FOR

Lake City High School

2010
-
15

DATE:
April

2010

Performance Goal Area:

Student Achievement
Teacher/Administrator Quality
School Climate (Parent Involvemen
t, Safe and Healthy Schools,
etc.)
District Priority

PERFORMANCE
GOAL
:

(desired result of
student learning)

By the year 2014
-
2015, 79% of all students will pass on the first attempt on HSAP in Math with a
score of 200 or greater.

I
NTERIM
PERFORMANCE
GOAL:

By the year 2010
-
2011
,
69%

of all students will pass on the first attempt on HSAP Math.

DATA SOURCE(S):

HSAP Scores, MAP Scores, school
-
wide formal and informal math assessments scores, and
PLATO.

OVERALL MEASURES
:

Average
Ba
seline

2010*

2011*

2012*

2013*

2014*

2015*

67.4
%

69.0
%

71.0
%

73.0
%

75.0
%

77.0
%

79.0
%

* Represents projections of improvement



SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


25




STRATEGY
:

2
) Teachers will implement developmentally
appropriate South Carolina standards in Math.

Activity

(List the

processes to fully implement the strategy. Include
professional development, scientifically based research, academic
assistance, innovation initiatives, parent involvement, technology
etc.)

Timeline

Start/En
d Date

Person
Responsible

Estimated
Cost

Funding

Source

(academic assistance,
innovation, retraining,
categorical funding, etc.)

Indicators of
Implementation

2
-
A)
Teachers will plan and teach lessons based
on curricula driven by state standards and align
instruction and as
sessment to the state standard
s
in Math.


2
-
B) Provide supplemental classroom teaching
materials/ supplies such as math manipulatives,
maps, Geoboards, calculators, graphing materials,
and white boards for all students to support
enriched math instruction.




2
-
C) Emphasize skills de
velopment in math
through computer
-
aided enrichment or tutorial
such as PLATO Lab.



2
-
D) Provide extended instructional time for
additional math interventions delivered through a
second block of instruction and at the ability level
of identified students
as measured by Grade 8
MAP.




2
-
E) Evening High School program that will
address the academic needs of students based
on student performance in the classroom and
academic needs.

8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15






8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15





8/10
-
5/15





8/10
-
5/15



Leadership
Team

Teachers


Principal

Teachers





Leadership
Team

Teache
rs


Principal

Guidance

Teachers



Principal

Assistant
Principal

Teachers


Leadership
Team

Teachers































Lesson Plans

TAP Observations



Purchase orders for
materials

Lesson Plans





PLATO Reports

Student Grades in
Class



Class Roster

Master Schedule

MAP Scores



Student logs

Student Class Grades

PLATO Student
Reports





SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


26




2
-
F) Use data generated from diagnostic
assessments (HSAP, MAP, quarterly
Benchmarks (pre and post test assessments),
traditional and non
-
traditional classroom
assessment strategies, etc…) to target lessons
and objectives to

meet the instructional needs of

students. Use USA Test Prep.



2
-
G) Increase the number of students pas
sing
Algebra I on the first attempt
.



2
-
H) Teachers will implement strategies from
weekly cluster meetings.



2
-
I) Provide tutoring program to address the
academic needs of students.


2
-
J) Use HSAP and MAP results to form flexible
grouping and to develop
personalized learning
plans for students.





8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15





8/10
-
5/15



8/10
-
5/15













Leadership
Team

Teachers


Leadership
Team
Teachers


Principal

Teachers


Principal

Guidance

Teacher





























Assessment Results

Benchmark Re
sults







EOC scores

Student Report Grades



Lesson Plans

TAP Observations



Tutoring schedule

Student Class Grades



Master Schedule

MAP & HSAP Scores

Student Schedules







SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


27








SCHOOL RENEWAL PLAN FOR

Lake City High School

2010
-
15


DATE:
April

2010

Performance Goal Area:

Student Achievement
Teacher/Administrator Quality
School Climate (Parent Involvement, Safe and Healthy Schools,
etc.)
District Priority

PERFORMANCE
GOAL
:

(desired result of
student learning)

By the year 2014
-
2015, 56% of all students will pass EOC test.

INTERIM
PERFORMANCE
GOAL:

By the year 2010
-
2011, 40%

of all students will pass the EOC tests in English, Algebra, B
iology,
US History

DATA SOURCE(S):

HSAP Scores, MAP Scores, school
-
wide formal and informal assessment scores, PLATO

OVERALL MEASURES
:

Average
Baseline

2010
*

2011
*

2012
*

2013
*

2014
*

2015
*

38.5
%

40.0
%

43.0
%

47.0
%

50.0
%

53.0
%

56.0
%



Represents projections

of improvement




SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


28


STRATEGY
:
3)

Teachers will implement
developmentally appropriate South Carolina
Standards in English I, Algebra I, Biology and US
History

Activity

(List the processes to fully implement the strategy.
Include professional development,

scientifically based
research, academic assistance, innovation initiatives,
parent involvement, technology etc.)

Timeline

Start/En
d Date

Person
Responsible

Estimated
Cost

Funding Source

(academic assistance,
innovation, retraining,
categorical funding, et
c.)

Indicators of
Implementation

3
-
A) Teachers will plan and teach lessons
based on curricula driven by state standards
and align instruction and assessment to the
state standards for EOCEP.



3
-
B) Use data generated from diagnostic
assessments (HSAP, MAP
, quarterly
Benchmarks, traditional and non
-
traditional
classroom assessment strategies, etc…) to
target lessons and objectives to meet the
instructional needs
of

students. Regularly
monitor the implementation of i
nstructional
programs. Use USA Test Prep.



3
-
C) Provide extended instructional time for
additional math interventions deliv
ered through
a second block of
instruction and at the ability
level of identified students as measured by
Grade 8 MAP.



3
-
D
) Teachers will incorporate EOC
preparation mat
erial
s

i n a l l E n g l i s h I,
A l g e b r a I, B i o l o g y, a n d U S H i s t o r y



3
-
E
) C o m m o n a s s e s s m e n t s a n d
b e n c h m a r k s w i l l b e d e v e l o p e d f o r a l l E O C
c l a s s e s.
U s e U S A T e s t P r e p.


8/1 0
-
8/1 5





8/1 0
-
8/1 5







8/1 0
-
8/1 5






8/1 0
-
8/1 5





8/1 0
-
8/1 5



P r i n c i p a l

T e a c h e r s




L e a d e r s h i p
T e a m

T e a c h e r s





P r i n c i p a l

T e a c h e r s

G u i d a n c e




L e a d e r s h i p
T e a m

T e a c h e r s



L e a d e r s h i p
T e a m

T e a c h e r s





















L e s s o n P l a n s


T A P O b s e r v a t i o n s




B e n c h m a r k R e s u l t s

A s s e s s m e n t R e s u l t s






M a s t e r S c h e d u l e

C l a s s R o s t e r

M A P S c o r e s

S t u d e n t

C l a s s G r a d e s



P u r c h a s e O r d e r s f o r m a t e r i a l s

L e s s o n P l a n s

T A P O b s e r v a t i o n s



A s s e s s m e n t R e s u l t s

B e n c h m a r k R e s u l t s






SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


29










3
-
F
) Teachers will design and implement
pacing guides that incorporate all academic
standards and timelines and meet weekly to
update a
nd revise plans as needed for all
EOC classes.


3
-
G
) The science curriculum and daily
instruction will be revised to include
opportunities to write using HSAP rubrics as
guides for scoring.

Use NCS Mentor.



3
-
H
) The social studies curriculum and daily
instruction will be revised to include
opportunities to write using HASP rubrics as
guides for scoring.


3
-
I
)
Teachers will implement strategies from
weekly cluster meetings.



3
-
J
) Provide EOC workshops for students
starting in January of each year to p
rovide
extra assistance to those students in need of
extra help to prepare them for EOC.




8/10
-
5/15





8/10
-
8/15





8/10
-
8/15




8/10
-
5/15




1/11
-
5/15

Leadership
Team

Teachers




Leadership
Team

Teachers



Leadership
Team

Teachers


Leadership
Team

Tea
chers


Leadership
Team

Teachers























Lesson Plans

Pacing Guides

TAP Observations




Student Work Graded

Lesson Plans

TAP Observations



Student Work Graded

Lesson Plans

TAP Observations



Lesson Plans

TA
P Observations

Walk
-
through
Observations


EOC scores

Student Sign in Sheets




SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


30





SCHOOL RENEWAL PLAN FOR:
Lake City High School 2010
-
15



DATE: April

2010

Performance Goal Area:


Student Achievement

Teacher/Administrator Quality
School Climate (Parent Involvement, Safe and Healthy Schools,
etc.)
District Priority

PERFORMANCE
GOAL
:

(desired result of
student learning)

By the year 2014
-
20
15, 93% of all students will graduate within four years.

INTERIM
PERFORMANCE
GOAL:

By the year 2010
-
2011, 73% of all students will graduate within four years.

DATA SOURCE(S):

HSAP Scores, MAP Scores, Graduation list.

OVERALL MEASURES
:

Average
Baseline

2010*

2011*

2012*

2013*

2014*

2015*

69.2
%


73.0
%

77.0
%

81.0
%

85.0
%

89.0
%

93.0
%


* Represents projections of improvement



SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


31


STRATEGY
:
4)

Teachers will implement
developmentally appropriate South Carolina
Standards in all academic areas
.

Activity

(List
the processes to fully implement the strategy. Include
professional development, scientifically based research,
academic assistance, innovation initiatives, parent involvement,
technology etc.)

Timeline

Start/End
Date

Person
Responsible

Estimated
Cost

Fund
ing Source

(academic assistance,
innovation, retraining,
categorical funding,
etc.)

Indicators

of

Implementation

4
-
A) Teachers will plan and teach lessons
based on curricula driven by state standards
and align instruction and assessment to the
state stand
ards.



4
-
B) Emphasize skill development in reading
and writing through the integration of reading
across the curriculum. Students will read books
based on their Lexile levels and complete tests

(Reading Counts)
and book reports.



4
-
C) Enhance developm
ent in reading, writing,
and research through computer
-
aided enrichment
such as PLATO lab
.




4
-
D) Collect writing samples in content areas to
track student progress and use
the
HSAP writing
rubric when grading.




4
-
E)
Continue the
credit recovery

progr
am
through the PLATO lab in Evening High School.


8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15





8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15


Leadership
Team

Teachers


Leadership
Team

Teachers



Leadership
Team

Teachers


Leadership
Team

Teachers


Principal

Assistant
Principal

Teache
rs







Lesson Plans

TAP
Observations



Reading Logs

Reading Counts
Quizzes




PLATO Schedule

PLATO Student
Reports



Student writing
samples

Writing Benchmarks



Students logs

PLATO reports

Student Class
Grades






SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


32






SCHOOL RENEWAL PLAN FOR:
Lake City
High School 2010
-
15



DATE:
April

2010

Performance Goal Area:


Student Achievement
Teacher/Administrator Quality
School Climate (Parent Involvement, Safe and Health
y Schools,
etc.)
District Priority

PERFORMANCE
GOAL
:

(desired result of
student learning)

By the year 2014
-
2015, 61% of all students with disabilities will pass the HSAP in ELA and 55% will
pass the HSAP in Math.

INTERIM
PERFORMA
NCE
GOAL:

1.)

By the year 2010
-
2011, 46% of all students with disabilities will pass the HSAP ELA on the first
attempt.

2.)

By the year 2010
-
2011, 40% of all students with disabilities will pass the HSAP Math on the first
attempt

DATA SOURCE(S):

HSAP scores, MAP
Scores, school
-
wide formal and informal ELA, Math, Science, and Social Studies
assessment, scores, PLATO.

OVERALL
MEASURES
:



% Passed on first
attempt

ELA





% Passed on first
attempt

Math

Average
Baseline

2010*

2011*

2012*

2013*

2014*

2015*


42.5
%


46.0
%


49.0
%


52.0
%


55.0
%


58.0
%


61.0
%


35.7
%


40.0
%


43.0
%


46.0
%


49.0
%


52.0
%


55.0
%

* Represents projections of improvement



SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


33


STRATEGY
:
5
)Teachers will implement
developmentally appropriate South Carolina
Standards in ELA, Math, Science,

and Social
Studies to increase achievement
for

students
with disabilities.

Activity

(List the processes to fully implement the strategy.
Include professional development, scientifically based
research, academic assistance, innovation initiatives,
par
ent involvement, technology etc.)

Timeline

Start/En
d Date

Person
Responsible

Estimated
Cost

Funding Source

(academic assistance,
innovation, retraining,
categorical funding, etc.)

Indicators of
Implementation

5
-
A) Provide one
-
on
-
one or small group
individ
ualized instruction.



5
-
B) Provide independent practice.



5
-
C) Provide sequence
-

Break down the
task
s

into step
-
by
-
step prompts.



5
-
D) Provide strategy clues
-

reminders to
use multi
-
steps, verbalize problem
-
solving
or procedures to solve problems, use

think

aloud instruction models.


5
-
E) Provide segment
-

Break

down
targeted ski
lls into smaller units and
synthesize the parts into a whole.




5
-
F) Provide

the following:

drill/repetition
and practice/review;
daily
test skills;
and
immediate feedback.

8/
10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15



8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15





8/10
-
5/15


Teachers




Teachers



Teachers




Teachers




Teachers





Teachers







Lesson Plans

TAP Observations

IEP Goals Progression


Lesson Plans

TAP Observations


Lesson Plans

TAP Obser
vations

IEP Goals Progression


Lesson Plans

TAP Observations

IEP Goals Progression


Lesson Plans

TAP Observations

IEP Goals Progression


Lesson Plans

TAP Observations

IEP Goals Progression





SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


3
4




5
-
G) Provide instruction in outlining main
idea/details

and

concepts.



5
-
H) Provide an outline of important points
from material to be read.



5
-
I) Provide IEP objectives that correlate
with ELA and Math curriculum standards.



5
-
J) Teach and reinforce organizational
skills to foster responsibilities for learning
.



5
-
K) Provide instruction in test
-
taking
strategies



5
-
L) Provide Progress Monitoring to graph
student improvement.




8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15



8/10
-
5/15



8/10
-
5/15



8/10
-
5/15






Teachers




Teachers




Resource

Teachers



Teachers



Teachers
Leadership
Team


Resource
Teachers







Lesson Plans

TAP Observations

IEP Goals Progression


Outline

Samples

Lesson Plans

TAP Observations


IEP Goals Progression

Lesson Plans



IEP Goals

Lesson Plans



Lesson Plans

TAP Observations


Students’
g牡res

Teachers’ records for
m牯r牥獳rjon楴i物ng





SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


35



SCHOOL RENEWAL PLAN FOR:
Lake City High School 2010
-
15



DATE:
April

2010

Performance Goal Area:


Student Achievement
Teacher/Administrat
or Quality
School Climate (Parent Involvement, Safe and Healthy Schools,
etc.)
District Priority

PERFORMANCE
GOAL
:

(desired result of
student learning)

By 2015, 100% of the teachers in
LCHS

will be highly qual
ified, competent, and technologically
proficient as measured by the end
-
of
-
year observations report and the State Department of
Education’s Technology Proficiency Report.

INTERIM
PERFORMANCE
GOAL:

By 2011, the percentage of teachers scoring 3.0 or higher
will increase by 10% as measured by
the Skills Knowledge and Responsibility Report for the Teacher Advancement Systems Program.


By 2011, the percentage of teachers scoring at the Mastery Level (80 or above) will increase 10%
yearly as measured by the Dist
rict and State Technology Proficiency System.


DATA SOURCE(S):

The Teacher Advancement Systems CODE data on teacher observations, NCLB reports, District
and State Technology reports


The State Technology Proficiency Portfolio System

OVERALL
MEASURES
:



Technology Prof.





SKR

(Skills, Knowledge
& Responsibility)

(3.5 or
higher)


Average
Baseline

2010*

2011*

2012*

2013*

2014*

2015*

59.7%

70.0%

80.0%

90.0%

95.0%

100%

100%

45%


50%

55%

60%

65%

70%

75%

* Represents projections of improvement





SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


36



STRAT
EGY
:
6)

Establish professional
development opportunities which will
increase teacher proficiencies in the TAP
instructional rubric, technology, and improve
student achievement through the
improvement of instruction while maintaining
the highly qualified st
atus of all content
teachers.

Activity

(List the processes to fully implement the strategy.
Include professional development, scientifically based
research, academic assistance, innovation initiatives,
parent involvement, technology etc.)

Timeline

Start/En
d Date

Person
Responsible

Estimated
Cost

Funding Source

(academic assistance, innovation,
retraining, categorical funding,
etc.)

Indicators of
Implementation

6
-
A) Provide training for all teachers on
Teacher Advancement Program (TAP)
requirements

based on

observation scores
(CODE)
.


6
-
B) Provide training for teachers on
strategies addressing the achievement
gap
s

and disparities relating to the
success of African
-
American and low
socioeconomic children. (Ruby Payne)


6
-
C)
Ensure all professional staff maste
r
technology competencies needed for
recertification by provided needed staff
development.



6
-
D) Provide a mentor teacher to assist
every newly hired teacher and master
teachers to help train teachers in the TAP
program.




8/10
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5/15



8/10
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5/15





8/10
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8/10
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8/10
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5/
15





Leadership
Team


Leadership

Team




Leadership
Team

Technology
Staff



District Office
Staff





District Office

Leadership
Team



























Sign
-
in Sheets

Lesson Plans

CODE reports


Meeting Agendas

Trainin
g Material



Computer Competency
Report

Sign
-
In sheets

Agenda from Staff
Developements


Mentor Teacher Logs





Orientation Session
Sign
-
in Sheets






SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


37



6
-
E) Provide orientation sess
ions for new
personnel.


6
-
F) Develop expertise in the analysis of
current test data (state test, benchmark
test, unit tests) for curriculum improvement
and to better explain data to parents.


8/10
-
5/15



Leadership
Team


Sign
-
in sheets

Break
-
down of data

Handouts

Observations

Cluster Meetings



6
-
G
) Establish a professio
nal library with
educational research literature,
professional journals, classroom manuals,
etc.



6
-
H
) Provide training for teachers to utilize
SC Academic Standards


6
-
I
)
Identify and compile data on teacher
certification areas, scores on observations
(CODE data), and technology proficiency.



6
-
J
)
Administer a needs assessment and
survey yearly to determine teacher
perceptions of needs.


6
-
K
) Meet monthly with district leadership
teams and weekly with school leadership
teams to ensure that all aspects
of the
Teacher Advancement Program are being
implemented and all teachers’ needs are
being met in our school.


6
-
L
) Hire highly qualified staff.


8/10
-
5/15





8/10
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5/15



8/10


5/15





8/10
-
5/15



8/10
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8/10
-
5/15

Leadership
Team




Leadership
Team


Leadership
Team




Leadership
Team


District and
School
Leadership
Teams





Principal

















Purchase orders for
materials




Agendas from
Trainings

Lesson Plans

Handouts

Observations


Technology Data

CODE data

Teacher certification
data


S
urvey results



Meeting Agendas

Sign In Sheets

Minutes of Meetings




Teacher certification
data


SCHOOL NAME



Lake City High School


38






SCHOOL RENEWAL PLAN FOR:
2010
-
15

DATE:
April 2010

Performance Goal Area:

Student Achievemen
t
Teacher/Administrator Quality
School Climate (Parent Involvement, Safe and Healthy Schools,
etc.)
District Priority

PERFORMANCE
GOAL
:

(desired result of
student learning)

By the year 2
014
-
2015
, all school report card surveys will indicate a minimum of 90%
satisfaction from teachers, students, and parents in the areas of: learning environment,
social and physical environment, and home
-
school relations.

INTERIM
PERFORMANCE
GOAL:

I.

By the

year 2010
-
2011
, a rating of
excellent

will be obtained for Character
Education implementation according to the School Report Card.

II.

By the year 2010
-
2011
, all school report card surveys will indicate a minimum of
75
% satisfaction from teachers, students, a
nd parents in the areas of: learning
environment, social and physical environment, and home
-
school relations

DATA
SOURCE(S):

Annual Evaluations, S
urveys
, Travel forms, HSAP scores


OVERALL
MEASURES
:

Character Education





Learning Environment


Social Physical

Home/School Relations

Baseline

2010*

2011*

2012*

Good

Good

Excellen
t

Excellent

Teachers

Students

Parents

Teachers

Students

Parents

Teacher

Students

Parents

Teachers

Students

Parents

68.2
%

61.7%

73.4%

73
%

66
%

78
%

77%

70
%

82
%

81
%

74
%

86
%

81.8%

63.6%

55.6%

86%

68%

60%

90%

72%

64%

94%

76%

68%

30.8%

74.5%

72.8%

35%

79%

77%

39%

83%

81%

43%

87%

85%


2013*

2014*

2015*

Excellent

Excellent

Excellent

Teachers

Students

Parents

Teachers

Students

Parents

Teachers

Students

Parents

85
%

78
%

90
%

89%

82%

94%

94%

86%

98%

98%

80%

72%

100%

84%

76%

100%

88%

80%

47%

91%

89%

51%

95%

93%

55%

99%

97%

* Represents projections of improvement



SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


39


STRATEGY
:
7
)

Provide a friendly and
safe
environment

that promotes parental
involvement

.
Activity

(List the processes to fully implement the strategy. Include
professional development, scientif
ically based research,
academic assistance, innovation initiatives, parent
involvement, technology etc.)

Timeline

Start/En
d Date

Person
Responsible

Estimated
Cost

Funding Source

(academic assistance,
innovation, retraining,
categorical funding, etc.)

Indic
ators of
Implementation

7
-
A) Provide teachers, parents, and
students with information concerning
gangs
and violence
in school
s as well as
other problems that affect teenagers.



7
-
B) Communicate sexual harassment and
bullying policies/procedures to parent
s,
students, faculty, and the community
.



7
-
C
) Implement a developmentally
appropriate character education program
through the Advisory class.




7
-
D
)

Provide supplies for SDFSCA
act
ivities such as Red Ribbon Week

and
Prom Promise.


7
-
E
) Expand the inv
olvement of area
businesses in career awareness activities,
such as, career days, field trips, and guest
speakers.


7
-
F
) Prepare and implement a parental
involvement policy as stated in NCLB



Sponsor quarterly Parent Nights to
involve parents in all phases
of school
planning and student achievement
efforts.



Provide parent information sessions on
the SC Curriculum Standards for ELA,
Math, Science, and Social Studies.



Sponsor an annual Gifted and Talented
Information meeting

8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15



8/10
-
5/15



8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15









Principal

Guidance


Principal



Principal

Advisory
Council


Drug Free
Liaison

Principal


Guidance

Teachers



Principal

Leadership
Teacher

Guidance

Teachers














Schedule and agenda
of meetings

Sign
-
in Sheets


A
gendas

Sign
-
in sheets

Handouts


Agendas

Advisory Lesson Plans


Log for Activities

Notebook of Monthly
activities



Agendas, Speakers
forms, and Field trip
documentation



Agendas

Sign
-
in sheets

Handouts






SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


40



7
-
G
) Collaborate with agencies suc
h as
the Department of Social Services (DSS),
the Department of Health and
Environmental Control (DHEC), and the
Department of Mental Health (DMH) to
provide services to families as needed.


7
-
H
)

Provide opportunities for parents,
businesses, and communi
ty members to
support and participate in LCHS activities

on a quarterly basis.


7
-
I
) Provide information to parents in a
format that will allow for full participation of
parents with limited English proficiency or
with disabilities, as necessary (forms,
ne
wsletters, etc.) through Translation
and
other s
ervices

as needed.



7
-
J
)
Provide professional development
trainings for school employees and SIC
members on Joyce Epstein’s Framework,
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8/10
-
5/15



8/10
-
5/15





8/10
-
5/15





8/10
-
5/15





8/10
-
5/15



8/10
-
5/15




8/10
-
5/15


Principal

Guidance





Principal

Leadership
Team


Principal

Teachers




Principal

District
Office Staff



District
Office
Staff

Principal

SRO


District
Office Staff


Principal

Guidance

SIC
Council



Principal























Agendas

Training sign
-
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Parents’ Sign
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SCHOOL NAME
-
Lake City High School


41


Parent/Family Involvement


7
-
N) Identify Health content teacher to
serve on district committee. Assist in
developing and monitoring the school
health plan.

7
-
O
) Provide a month
ly e
-
newsletter on
the school website for the parents and
community and use the phone messenger
to notify parents of important dates and
events.



8/10
-
5/15

Health
Teacher

Principal

Media
Specialis
t

Attendance
Clerk


Monthly newsletter

Phone messenger logs