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1

Course Syllabus


for

Student Teaching

(Syllabus is tentative due to supervisor’s discretion.)


COURSE INFORMATION

Course Credit:

3
-
12 hours, according to degree plan

Semester/Year:
Spring 2007

Course Meeting Time/Location
: 14
-
week field based practicum

(Monday
-
Friday) located in
assigned school

Course Description:

Supervised student teaching involving a period of major responsibility for
instruction and learning in an appropriate classroom of an accredited school

Course Purpose:

This course is designe
d to increase the student’s knowledge of the
instructional processes in an appropriate classroom through a 14
-
week field
-
based

practicum in
which the student assumes responsibility for instruction and programming.


COURSE UNIVERSITY SU
PERVISOR

Ruby Willey
-
Rendon

Telephone:
742
-
1997 ext. 236

Email
:
ruby.willey@ttu.edu


RELATIONSHIP TO THE CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

Incorporation of College’s Organizing Theme

The student teaching course relates to the overall theme of educator preparation, “Professional
Educators O
pening Doors to the Future,” in that the course develops “knowledge,” “skills” and
“dispositions” that enable the doors to be opened. We, as the “Professional Educators” at Texas
Tech, share knowledge, skills and dispositions with our students enabling th
em to open doors to
their futures. In turn, our students, now as professional educators share knowledge, skills and
dispositions with their students allowing those individuals to open doors to their futures
.


Program’
s Purpose/ Goal

The goal of the studen
t teaching course is to help prepare creative, reflective and innovative
professional educators with high moral and ethical standards who view themselves as agents of
change, who are committed to the welfare of children, and who have the understanding, att
itudes
and skills necessary for effective teaching.


Beliefs
/Commitment to Diversity

The student teaching
program will prepare student

teachers to be professional educators who
demonstrate appropriate knowledge, skills and dispositions; integrate theory an
d practice; respect
and value individuals; advocate socially just education; serve as change agents; and remain life
-
long learners
.


Student teachers will reflect upon their practice and, in turn, help children reflect upon their
learning. A desired outco
me is that student teachers grow as professionals who realize effective
teaching is a developmental, reflective process that rests upon diagnosis and interpretation in
specific classrooms.


2


Course experiences and instruction in this course are guided by th
e College’s fundamental
concepts of schools, learning, and teaching:

1.

Education is the aggregate of all the processes by means of which a person
develops abilities, attitudes, and other forms of behavior of positive value in the
society in which he/she live
s.

2.

Schools are social agents that transmit culture; teach skills; promote learning;
develop multicultural and global perspectives; and foster the social, physical,
emotional, and intellectual growth of students.

3.

Learning is an active process, involving the

use of existing concepts and
constructs, to develop new meaning as new information and new experiences are
encountered.

4.

Teaching is a reflective, developmental, and continuous process that requires
judgment, action, and the capacity to analyze and revise
instructional decisions on
the basis of insights and judgments rooted in understandings of teaching, learning,
learners, content, and context.

5.

Teachers are responsible for facilitating learning for all students; and for
nurturing, building, and supporting
human connections that facilitate positive and
productive learning environments.


The Division of Curriculum and Instruction offers a well
-
planned course sequence with
experiences that include theory, methods, and current knowledge for professional compete
nce in
teaching and learning. This particular course informs student teachers about research
-
based
strategies and skills to assist their diagnosis and evaluation of students during the student
teaching semester. It places student teachers at the center o
f the problem solving process to
discover how learning takes place from children’s perspectives.



Commitment to Technology

The student teacher will incorporate the effective use of technology to plan, organize, deliver and
evaluate instruction. The stude
nt teacher will produce an electronic portfolio which
will
demonstrate his or her competency in designing instruction and assessm
ent to promote student
learning;

in
creating a positive, pr
oductive classroom environment;

in
implementing effective,
responsiv
e instruction and assessment
;

and
in
fulfilling of professional responsibilities.


S
TUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES AND ASSESSMENTS OF OUTCOMES

Student Learning Outcomes


Assessments

By the conclusion of EDEL 4000, EDEC
4000

o
r EDSE 4000,
the

student will be
able to demonstrate the following
competencies:



3

Domain I: Design

instruction a
nd assessment to
promote student le
arning

1.

The teacher understands human developmental
processes and applies this knowledge to plan
instruction and ongoing ass
essment that motivate
students and are responsive to their developmental
characteristics and needs.

2.

The teacher understands student diversity and knows
how to plan learning experiences and design
assessments that are responsive to differences among
student
s and that promote all students’ learning.

3.

The teacher understands procedures for designing
effective and coherent instruction and assessment based
on appropriate learning goals and objectives.

4.

The teacher understands learning processes
and factors that im
pact student learning and
demonstrates this knowledge by planning
effective, engaging instruction and
appropriate assessments.

Domain II: Create

a positive, productive
cl
assroom environment


5.

The teacher knows how to establish a classroom
climate that fos
ters learning, equity, and excellence and
uses this knowledge to create a physical and emotional
environment that is safe and productive.

6.

The teacher understands strategies for creating an
organized and productive learning environment and for
managing stud
ent behavior.


Domain III: Implement

effective, responsive
instruction and assessment


7.

The teacher understands and applies principles and
strategies for communicating effectively in varied
teaching and learning contexts.

8.

The teacher provides appropriate i
nstruction that
actively engages students in the learning process.

9.

The teacher incorporates the effective use of
technology to plan, organize, deliver, and evaluate
instruction for all students.

10.

The teacher monitors student performance and
achievement; pro
vides students with timely, high
-
quality feedback; and responds flexibly to promote
learning for all students.



Domain IV: Fulfill
professional roles and
responsibilities


11.

The teacher understands the importance of family
involvement in children’s educati
on and knows how to
interact and communicate effectively with families.

12.

The teacher enhances professional knowledge and
skills by effectively interacting with other members of
the educational community and participating in various
types of professional act
ivities.

13.

The teacher understands and adheres to legal and
ethical requirements for educators and is
knowledgeable of the structure of education in Texas.






4

These learning outcomes (competencies) are clarified with descriptors on the State Board for
Edu
cator Certification website (
http://www.sbec.state.tx.us/stand_framewrk/TExES/Ppr_EC
-
12.pdf
). They will be measured by the “Student Teaching Assessment Rubrics” found in the
St
udent Teacher Handbook.


EVALUATION
:

1.

The TTU supervisor and the cooperating teacher will evaluate the student teacher on
teaching effectiveness. Various TTU observations records will be utilized for evaluation
as well as the mid
-
point and final evaluation

forms found in the
Student Teaching
Handbook
.

2.

The student teacher will be evaluated on attendance and on satisfactory performance of
assigned duties.

3.

The student teacher will be evaluated by the policies and procedures described in the
Student Teaching Ha
ndbook
. This includes the
Code of Ethics

and
Code of Conduct for
Texas Tech Student Working in Elementary and Secondary Schools
.


METHODS

1.

Individualized learning;

2.

Field
-
based experiences/activities/assignments


GRADING POLICY

The student teacher will rec
eive Credit (C) or No Credit (NC) for the course based upon
performance


evaluated by the policies and procedures described in the
Student Teaching
Handbook
.



SPECIFIC ASSIGNMENTS
/REQUIREMENTS

1.

The student teacher will
email

a schedule for the classro
om day to the university

supervisor
.


2. The student teacher will schedule with the university supervisor
three

formal

observations

per placement
.
One
of these observations must be completed before
Feb.
9
th

and Apr. 6
th

(
mid
-
term)
.

The
TaskStream

lesson

plan format will be used for these
observations. The lesson

should reflect an
entire
lesson cycle and be approximately
45
to
90

minutes
in

length
.
Lesson plans can be e
mailed to the uni
versity supervisor for review.
At least one informal
observation will

be made by the university supe
rvisor in
addition to
regular visits.


3. The student teacher will demonstrate significant use of technology in the classroom
and


will
submit documentation

of
one lesson
to

the university supervisor.
Documentation i
s


due by
Apr.

20
th
.


4.

The student teacher should be continually involved i
n the self
-
evaluation process.

This

includes examining the goals and outcomes of each instructional activity
,

reviewing

videotapes of their teaching, soliciting feedback with sug
gestions for

improvement, and
seeking immediate answers to problems. Student teachers will

purchase a videotape and
complete at least one video
-
taped lesson of themselves
.
Student teachers will prepare a
paper summarizing this

experience of self
-
assessmen
t and evaluation which will be due
by
Apr. 11
th
.



5

5
.


The student teacher will produce at least
one self
-
made bulletin board
. Documentation is
due by

Apr. 11
th
.

6
.
The student teacher will keep a reflective journal. The purpose of this journal is

to
allow


the student teacher to reflect upon his/her professional development

during the


student teaching experience, to integrate theory with practice, and
to

communicate


with the university s
upervisor. This
feedback
is

an

important

process. Equally


important is a feeling of confidentiality by the

student

teacher

so he/she can


comfortably and openly express feelings.

Student teachers will journal
weekly and submit


the journal entry

by

email the supervisor.

Thi
s reflection
must be

received by th
e


university supervisor no later than Sunday evening prior to the beginning of each


new school week.



7
.

The student teacher will submit a professional portfol
io
to the Capstone instructor
at the
end of the semester.

The
portfolio is a compilat
ion of evide
nce to show the student
teacher’
s progress from student

to professional. Evidence of
proficiency in each of the
13 competencies will be documented.

This portfolio will be due according to the
deadline given by the Capstone instructor.


8
.
Th
e student teacher will establish a plac
ement file at the Career Center by
Apr. 20
th
.


9.
The student teacher will develop a document for students’ evaluation of his/her

work. A


copy of

this document will be submitted to the university supervisor by

Apr
. 20
th
.

1
0
.

The

student teacher will complete the Exit Evaluation of Student Teaching
Experience
(online) by
Apr. 20
th
.


11.

The student teacher will attend two out
-
of
-
class student activities and submit
documentation by
Apr. 20
th
.

12.

The student teache
r will develop detailed written lesson plans in advance of the lessons
that incorporate the TAKS/TEKS and actively involve students. Lesson plans should be
on file at all times. Lesson plans must be reviewed by the cooperating teacher before the
lesson is

presented.
There is

no excuse for not having lesson plans.




Student Teaching Schedule



Week


Dates



Schedule





Assignments

1

Jan. 16
-
19



Observe



Help with classroom
tasks, individual
tutoring, etc…



Gather information on
the class

and the school



Classroom schedule for first
placement either through email or
Supervisor Folder by Jan 19
th
.



Email Supervisor times for four
formal observations. Two
observations need to be scheduled
before Feb. 9
th
.



Reflective Journal.

2

Jan. 22
-
26



Pic
k
-
up 2
-
3 subjects.
(Stagger this throughout
the week. Don’t try to
pick them all up on


Reflective Journal.


6

Monday.)

3

Jan. 29
-
Feb. 2



Pick up remaining
subjects. (Again,
stagger this.)



Reflective Journal.

4

Feb. 5
-
9



Full teach



Feb 9
th

is mid
-
term for
f
irst assignment.



Reflective Journal.

5

Feb. 12
-
16



Full teach



Mid
-
term evaluations



Mid term conference



Reflective Journal.

6

Feb. 19
-
23



Full teach first half of
week.



Begin transitioning
back over to
Cooperating Teacher
during second half of
week.



Reflect
ive Journal.

7

Feb. 29
-
Mar. 2



Complete the transition
back to the cooperating
teacher.



Final evaluation by
Cooperating Teacher.



Contact Cooperating
Teacher at 2
nd

school.



Say goodbye to
students!



Reflective Journal.

Switch Schools

Switch Schools

Switch S
chools

Switch Schools

8

Mar. 5
-
9



March 5


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湥眠獣桯潬h



Help with classroom
tasks, individual
tutoring, etc…



Gather information on
the class and the school



Pick up 1
-
2 subjects by
the end of the week.



Reflective Journal.

9

Mar. 19
-
23



Pick up
2
-
3 more
subjects.



Reflective Journal.

10

Mar.26
-
30



Pick up remaining
subjects and begin full
teach by mid
-
week.



Reflective Journal.

11

Apr. 2
-
6



Full teach.



April 6
th

is mid
-
term for
second assignment.



Mid
-
term evaluations.



Reflectiv
e Journal.


7



Mid
-
term conference.

12

Apr. 9
-
13



Full teach M
-
W.



Begin transition back to
Cooperating Teacher on
Th
-
F.



Video taped lesson reflection due by
Apr. 11
th
.



Documentation of one self
-
made
interactive bulletin board or learning
center by Apr. 11
th
.



Reflective Journal.



Ap
r. 11
th

is the last opportunity to
teach the technology lesson.

13

Apr. 16
-
20



Complete transition
back to Cooperating
Teacher.



Reflective Journal.



Establish a placement file at the
career center no later than Apr. 20
th
.



Documentation of attendance of
Facu
lty/Grade
-
level meetings, in
-
service, and a PTA meeting by Apr.
20
th
.



Documentation of technology use in
the classroom by Apr. 20
th
.



Document of evaluation of the
students work due by Apr. 20
th
.

14

Apr. 23
-
27



Observe other
classrooms during last
week.



Fin
al evaluation by
Cooperating Teacher
and University
Supervisor.



Say goodbye to
students!



Reflective Journal.



Exit Evaluation of Student Teaching
Experience (online) by Apr. 27
th
.





POLICIES

1.

The student teacher is a guest in the assigned school; therefor
e, he/she is expected to
support school policies and personnel. All school rules and regulations should be
followed.

Anything that the student teacher is unsure about should be discussed with the
cooperating teacher and/or principal. The school policy ma
nual should be read at the
beginning of the student teaching experience.

2.

Student teaching is a full
-
time job. This includes responsibility for the entire class plus
any out
-
of
-
class responsibilities. Daily attendance and preparation should reflect the
se
riousness of this responsibility.

3.

The student teacher is to be on time and prepared for each day.
Student teachers will
arrive at school at the time designated for teachers and remain after school to complete
planning and gathering of materials for the fo
llowing class day.
In the event of an
absence or an emergency, it is the student teacher’s responsibility to notify the

8

cooperating teacher and TTU supervisor no later than 7:30 a.m. on the day the
absence occurs. Absences other than those approved by
the university, e.g., job
fair, interviews, will be made up.
You will be expected to be on
-
campus during the
regularly scheduled contract time. Any schedule variance should be discussed with your
university supervisor.
After four absences, student teacher
s must conference with the
Coordinator of Clinical Experiences to determine whether student teaching may be
continued
.

4.

The student teacher will dress, talk, and act as a professional.

Jeans should not be worn
unless permission is granted by the individual

school. Neatness in attire is expected. If
there is any doubt regarding the appropriateness of certain clothing, then it must not be
worn. The student teacher is on the job and no longer going from class to class on
campus!

5.

The student teacher is to ex
emplify professionalism in dealing with confidential
information.

6.

The student teacher will assume responsibility for the quality of the experience, seek out
new involvement possibilities, and ask for new assignments or responsibilities as soon as
possible.

7.

The student teacher
will

take part in out
-
of
-
class activities such as PTA, faculty and
professional meetings, routine teaching and non
-
teaching tasks.

8.

The student teacher is not a substitute teacher.

9.

The student teacher will communicate with the universit
y supervisor about problems,
progress and visitation times.

10.

The student teacher will display self
-
reliance, desire, enthusiasm, and initiative.

11.

The student teacher will observe the instructional strategies of the cooperating teacher
and the classroom manag
ement techniques employed.

It is suggested that the student
teacher take notes regarding these observations and ask questions as needed. The student
teacher should be fair, reasonable, and consistent in dealing with students. Lessons
which are motivating
, age
appropriate

and relevant will ensure less off
-
task behavior.
Students do not expect student teachers to be one of their peers, so the student teacher
should not

make the mistake of trying to be a “buddy” to the students.

12.

The student teacher will lea
rn the names of the students in assigned classes

as well as
the relevant staff members in the school.

13.

The student teacher
will

test new ideas within the structure the cooperating teacher has
established, making them available to the cooperating teacher sev
eral days in advance of
the lesson.

14.

The student teacher
will

consult with the cooperating teacher regarding use of supplies.
If the materials made by the student teacher will be kept by the student teacher, then he or
she should purchase the supplies.

15.

The

student teacher
will

model appropriate handwriting, as well as correct
grammar and spelling.









9

INSTRUCTIONAL UNITS
(FRAMEWORK FOR THE S
TUDENT TEACHING
EXPERIENCE)


1. School orientation/observation


2.

Induction (including participation
and full instructional

responsibility) demonstrating,
designing instruction and assessment to promote student learning; creating a
positive,

productive classroom environment; implementing effective, responsive instruction and


assessment; and f
ulfilling professional roles and responsibilities


3. Culmination/Phase out



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Multiple intelligences in the classroom.

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Development.

Baird, B. N. (2000).

The internship, practicum, and field placement handbook
. 2
nd

ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Bredekamp, S. & Copple, C. (Eds.) (1997).
Developmentally appropriate practice in early childhood programs.

Washington,
DC: National Association
for the Education of Young Children.

Clark, C. (1995).
Thoughtful teaching
. New York: Teachers College Press.

Emmer, E. T., Evertson, C. M., & Worsham, M. E. (2006).

Classroom
m
anagement for
m
iddle and
h
igh
s
chool
t
eachers.

7
th

ed.
Boston, MA: Pearson.

Evertson, C. M., Emmer, E. T., & Worsham, M. E. (2006).
Classroom management for elementary school teachers.

7
th

ed.
Boston, MA: Pearson.

Fennimore, B. (1995).
Student centered classroom management
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Fine, M. (1995).
Habits of mind: Str
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-
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Corwin.

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Kohn, A. (1996).
Beyond discipline: From compliance to community
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Lawton, T. (1997). Encouraging friendships among
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228
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Morely, D., & Chen, K. H. (Eds). (1996).
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New
York: Rutledge.


NASSP (1996).
Breaking Ranks: Changing an American institution
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Sheets, R
.
H. (2006).

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ole of culture in the teaching
-
Learning process
. Boston, MA:
Pearson.

Swartz, R. and Parks, S.
(1994).
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design handbook
. Pacific Grove, CA.: Critical Thinking Press and Software.

Slavin, R. (1990).
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. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice H
all.

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r. Mountain View, CA: Harry K
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Wormeli, Rick. (2001).
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-
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