Is your head in the clouds?

jeanscricketInternet and Web Development

Nov 3, 2013 (3 years and 11 months ago)

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Is your head in the clouds?


A WebQuest for First Grade (Science)

Designed by

Ms. Kaley Barrington

kmbarringt@usieagles.org



Introduction

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Task

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Process

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Evaluation

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Conclusion

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Standards

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Resources

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Teacher

Notes


Introduction


Have you ever looked up in the sky and wondered, “what a cloud was?” or
“why it has that funny shape?” You will be taking on the role of head
meteorologists at your local weather station. Your job is to investigate
what a cloud is, t
he different types, how they are formed, and the
weather they produce.


Introduction

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Task

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Process

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Evaluation

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Conclusion

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Standards

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Resources

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Teacher Notes



The Task




First, with a partner, you

will complete an investigative report about what
clouds are, the different types, how they are formed, and the weather
they produce, using the resources provided. After you have completed
your investigation, you will create a cloud book, and at the end of

week
you will be able to make predictions about the weather just by looking at
the clouds. Each book will have a page for each of the different types of
clouds. Each page should have a picture of the cloud, and a brief
description of the type and how it i
s formed. Throughout the lesson, we
will be working with a digital camera taking pictures of real life clouds.
These pictures will be used for the front cover of your cloud book.

Introduction

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Ta
sk

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Process

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Evaluation

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Conclusion

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Standards

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Resources

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Tea
cher Notes




The Process



1.

First, you must each choose a partner to help with your investigation.

2.

Once you have chosen your partner, you will each take on a role of
either navigator or recorder. The navigator will be the person on the
computer, and
the recorder will fill in the cloud worksheet. Click on
the cloud

to get the worksheet.

3.

Click the links below to find the answers to your worksheets:

How a cloud i
s formed



Different Types of Clouds


4.

Each group should complete two worksheets, one for each student.
When your group has completed the worksheets, talk with your other
classmates to check your

conclusions.

5.

On your own, using your cloud worksheets, begin to create your cloud
book.

6.

Your cloud book will be made with six pieces of construction paper,
which will be used as your pages.

7.

Then, cut your worksheet into three sections. Each section shou
ld
contain your drawing the type of cloud, your brief description of the
cloud, its location, and the weather it produces.

8.

Once you are through cutting, glue each section of your worksheet
onto a piece of construction paper. You should have 3 pages
complet
ed for your book.

9.

The other three pieces of construction paper will be used for your
cloud formation page, and your front and back cover.

10.

For your cloud formation page, neatly write a brief description
of how a cloud forms on a piece of notebook paper.

11.

Cu
t your notebook paper down, so that your description fits on a
piece of construction paper. Then, glue the notebook paper onto a
piece of construction paper.

12.

During recess, we will be taking turns using the digital camera
to take pictures of the clouds.

13.

Af
ter I have printed your cloud pictures, you will each glue your
picture on a piece of construction paper. Above your picture, create
a title for your cloud book.

14.

Under your cloud picture, place the word “BY:” and your name.
Every book has an author.

15.

Organi
ze your pages of construction paper in the order you
would like your book to go. Then, using the three
-
hole punch, you
will cut three holes for the yarn that will bind your book together.

16.

Using the pre
-
cut pieces of yarn, tie a bow around each hole.

17.

Finall
y, once everyone has completed their book, we will
discuss, as a class, how we can use
the
information we learned about clouds to tell
about the weather.

Here is a site that has cool pictures of

clouds:

Real Clouds with Different Shapes



Introduction

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Task

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Process

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Evaluation

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Conclusion

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Standards

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Resources

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Teacher Notes



Evaluation

You will be graded on your worksheet, weat
her book, and
partner participation:


Click to view rubric



Introduction

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Task

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Process

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Evaluation

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Conclusion

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Standards

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Resources

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Teacher Notes



Conclusion




“What is a cloud?”, “How are clouds formed?”, “Why do th
ey have
that funny shape?”, and “What will the weather be today?” These are all
questions that you are now able to answer. I challenge you to pass your
knowledge on, help your family be prepared for the weather that will
come.



Introduction

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Task

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Process

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Evaluation

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Conclusion

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Standards

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Teacher Notes



Standards


1.1.3

Recognize and demonstrate how people can learn much about
plants and animals by observing them closely over a period of time.
Recognize also that care must be taken to know th
e needs of living things
and how to provide for them

1.2.7

Write brief informational descriptions of a real object, person,
place, or event using information from observations.

1.3.1

Recognize and explain that water can be a liquid or a solid and can
go ba
ck and forth from one form to the other. Investigate by
observing that if water is turned into ice and then the ice is
allowed to melt, the amount of water is the same as it was before
freezing.

1.3.3

Investigate by observing and also measuring that the su
n warms
the land, air, and water..


Introduction

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Task

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Process

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Evaluation

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Conclusion

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Standards

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Teacher Notes



Resources


These links are resources used on this page. Links relative to the
student are under “Process” section:


http://www.artie.com/20030826/arg
-
race
-
car
-
full
-
url.html


http://www.weatherwizkids.com/cloud.htm


http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wcloud0.htm


http://www.gifs.net/gif/

Introduction

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Task

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Process

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Evaluation

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Conclusion

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Standards

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Resources

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Teacher Notes


Created by _Kaley Barrington
kmbarringt@usieagles.org

April 6, 2007

Adapted from
http://webquest.sdsu.edu/LessonTemplate.html

located on Bernie Dodge’s Training Materials Site.