Final Project Paper

jeanscricketInternet and Web Development

Nov 3, 2013 (4 years and 6 days ago)

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Kyle Bashford




Cloud Computing




To store information on a computer for long term use, an
individual would need t
o store it on a hard drive. This is not normally an
issue, but if that hard drive became corrupt, the information would be
difficult to recover. The only way to back up your data is to back it up
on another storage medium. From there, the choice is either,

to put the
data on a hard drive, flash drive, data disks or to put it in the cloud. The
problem with hard drive, flash drives, and disks is having to remember
where they, or worry about breaking them. The cloud is a server where
all the stored data is. A
user can put the file/data in the cloud and
retrieve it at anytime. Before technology was easily available to
individuals, people would have paid a company to own a server, so their
data was secure, or had to maintain their own server. For companies,
the
administration would hire IT employees and buy the necessary
hardware so they can maintain their own server
[1]
.




With technology advancing and becoming cheaper, individuals can
maintain their own servers. In more recent years, services like Dropbox,
or
iCloud by Apple, can host these file servers, also known as cloud
servers, at low costs. Dropbox, for example, offer free storage up to 2
gigabytes [as of 2012], while storing higher amounts of data would
require a premium service. The main problem that pe
ople have about
storing their information in the cloud is the fear of their data being
unsecured. Some of the fears can consist of the Cloud Service Providers
would go through the user’s files and sell their information to
companies, or the server could be

vulnerable to hackers or other
outsource threat
[2]
. Most of the reliable Cloud Service Providers (CSP)
use secure protocols to encrypt the user’s data from unwanted sources.
However, a CSP tends to appeal for the average person who want to sync
their doc
uments to the cloud.




A company, school, or business can extend their power with the
cloud. If a place needs many computers available for employees or
students, these places can buy and maintain thin or fat clients. A thin
clients are computers, typical
ly small, that rely on other computers or
servers to handle the computing. While a fat client is a full desktop
computer while all the data
stored onto a server. T
hin client are small
computer with low amounts of interfaces to make them easier to store
and

save power. The downside of the thin clients is that the server does
most of the work and tends to be very slow for the users. Some reasons
why the thin clients are slow can depend on how many other clients are
connected to the server, and modern computer
s use a virtual desktop
environment for the
clients

[
3]
. Fat clients on the other hand use the
client’s computer to do most of the work while the client doesn’t need
the cloud to work.




These
schools

and businesses may use services like Windows
enterpri
se, Solaris, OSX servers, or even some Linux distributions to
run on the
se clients depending the user

needs. One main reason for
companies and schools would use these operating systems is to manage
who uses the cloud and servers, so a company may assign us
ernames
and passwords to make sure only their staff uses the client computers.
A password can only up to a point, so security is very important for a
company or school to keep track. The IT staff would need to understand
how the cloud is designed, and to w
atch on who accesses the cloud
[4]
.




In conclusion, with the advancement of technology, the more it
can be implemented in daily life. From serving the average person, to
helping a business expand and share their data, information has been
easily access
ible.























Sources

[1] Ristov, S., Gusev, M., & Kostoska, M. (2012). CLOUD COMPUTING SECURITY IN BUSINESS
INFORMATION SYSTEMS.

International Journal Of Network Security & Its Applications
,

4
(2), 75
-
93.
doi:10.5121/ijnsa.2012.4206


[2]
Syam Kumar, P. P., & Subramanian, R. R. (2011). An Efficient and Secure Protocol for Ensuring
Data Storage Security in Cloud Computing.
International Journal Of Computer Science Issues
(IJCSI)
,

8
(6), 261
-
274.


[3] Deboosere, L., Vankeirsbilck, B., Simoens,
P., De Turck, F., Dhoedt, B., & Demeester, P. (2012).
Cloud
-
Based Desktop Services for Thin Clients.

IEEE Internet Computing
,

16
(6), 60
-
67.
doi:10.1109/MIC.2011.139


[4]
Bisong, A., & Rahman, S. M. (2011). AN OVERVIEW OF THE SECURITY CONCERNS IN
ENTERPRISE

CLOUD COMPUTING.

International Journal Of Network Security & Its Applications
,

3
(1),
30
-
45. doi:10.5121/ijnsa.2011.3103