AIS 395 - www4 - Northern Arizona University

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Nov 9, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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Effective Fall 2012

tt

UCC/UGC
/ECCC

Proposal for New Course

Please attach proposed Syllabus in
approved university format
.


1. Course
subject and number:

AIS 395

2. Units:

3






See upper and lower division undergraduate course definitions.


3. College:

Social and Behavioral Sciences

4. Academic Unit:

Applied
Indigenous Studies
Department


5
.
Student Learning Outcomes of the

new course.
(
Resources & Examples for Developing Course Learning
Outcomes
)




S
tudents will

develop an understanding of the various
laws,
policies, regulations, common, and
unique issues and aspects of managing environmental programs within American Indian tribal
g
overnments and on tribal lands, including CERCLA, NEPA, RCRA and EPA’s Tribal Trea
tment as States
policy.




Students will understand the unique challenges associated with tribal environmental programs, and
the federal resources available to assist tribes in development and administration of their own
environ
mental programs and department
s, including jurisdictional issues on the various legal land
statuses within tribal jurisictional areas, and the sometimes contradictory roles of the Bureau of Indian
Affairs in resolving tribal environmental issues.




Students

will

have
examine
d

various t
ribal environmental programs

such as the General Assistance
Program and the Native American Environmental Lands Mitigation Program,
and develop
ed

a project
that profiles one particular tribal
environmental program and
analyzed

various functions of the
pr
ogram and how it interfaces with federal agencies, laws and regulations.




6.

Justification for new course
, including how the course contributes to
degree program outcomes
,
or

other university requirements / student learning outcomes.
(
Resources, Examples & Tools for Developing
Effective Program Student Learning Outcomes
).

This course fills a void in the curriculum for both the Bachelor of Science in Applied Indigenous
Studies and the Bachelor of Arts in Applied Indigenous Studies. In particularly, it supports Policy and
Administration and Environmental and Human Health Sci
ence, Policy, and Management
study
interests
. No other existing course addresses the particular unique aspects of administration and
management of environmental programs within tribal jurisdictional areas. This is an important subject
for those who will
become administrators and environmental managers in tribal communities and for
those who will become professionals working as consultants for in government agencies who
interface with tribal communities (particularly in the federal government and in state
governments).




Effective Fall 2012


7. Effective
BEGINNING

of what term and year?

Fall 2013



See effective dates calendar
.




8.


Long course title:

Tribal Environmental Management


(max 100 characters including spaces)



9. Short course title:

Tribal Environmental
Management


(max. 30 characters including spaces)


10
.

Catalog course description
(max. 60 words, excluding requisites):

This course examines the various
aspects of environmental management within American Indian tribal governments,
including regulations, laws, policies and programs particular to environmental management in a tribal administrative
setting. Students will explore environmental issues common
in tribal communities, American Indian reservations and
Indian Country (as defined by federal law), and unique jurisdictional aspects of managing environmental programs on
tribal lands.





11
.

Will

this course

be part of
any plan (major, mi
nor or certifi
cate) or sub plan (e
mphasis
)?













































Yes
X

No

AISBA/BS only



If yes,
include the appropriate plan proposal
.


12
. Does this course duplicate content
of existing courses? Yes

No
X

If yes, list the courses with duplicate material.

If
the duplication is greater than
20%,

explain
why
NAU

should establish this course.


13
.

Will

this course

impact any other academic unit’s enrollment or

plan(s)?











Yes

No
X








If yes,
include a letter of response from each impacted academic unit.


1
4.

Grading option:






Letter grade
X




















Pass/Fail























Both



15. Co
-
convened with:

none

14a. UGC approval date
*
:



(For example: ESE 450 and ESE 550)
See co
-
convening policy
.






*
Must be approved by UGC before UCC submission, and both course syllabi must be presented.



16.

Cross
-
listed with:

none



(For example: ES 450 and DIS 450)
See cross listing policy
.







Please submit a single cross
-
listed syllabus that will be used for all cross
-
listed
courses.


17. May course be repeated for additional units?



Yes




No
X


16a. If yes, maximum units allowed?




16b. If yes, may course be repeated for additional units in the same term?


Yes




No

Effective Fall 2012


18. Prerequisites:

None



If prerequisites, include the rationale for the prerequisites.
No prerequisite is needed. An
overview of the distinct legal and political status of American Indian tribal nations will be provided
during the first week of
the course to lay a foundation for understanding the unique aspects of the
application of environmental laws and implementations of related programs on tribal lands.

19. Co requisites:

None



If co requisites, include the rationale for the co requisites.


20
. Does this course include combined lecture and lab components?


















Yes

No
X



If yes,
include
the units specific to each component in the course description above.


21. Names of the current faculty qualified to teach this course:

Karen Jarratt
-
Snider, Octaviana
Trujillo, Priscilla Sanderson



Answer 2
2
-
2
3

for UCC/ECCC only:


2
2
. Is this course being proposed for Liberal Studies designation?












Yes


No
X









If yes,
include a

Liberal Studies proposal

and syllabus with this proposal.


2
3
. Is this course being proposed for Diversity designation?




































Yes



N
oX








If yes,
include a
Diversity proposal

and syllabus with this proposal.


Annette Lawrence

10/10/2012

Reviewed by
Curriculum Process Associate

Date



Approvals
:




10/9/2012

Department Chair/ Unit Head (if appropriate)

Date




Chair of college curriculum committee

Date




Dean of college

Date




For Committee use only:





UCC/UGC/ECCC Approval

Date


Effective Fall 2012



Approved as submitted: Yes

No

Approved as modified: Yes

No

Effective Fall 2012

College of Social and Behavior
al Sciences

Department of Applied Indigenous Studies


AIS 395 Tribal Environmental Management

3 Credit Hours

Online Delivery


Karen L. Jarratt
-
Snider, Ph.D.





Assistant Professor






e
-
mail: Karen.Jarratt
-
Snider@nau.edu


Office: Bldg. 70, Rm. 216


Offi
ce Hours: T, Th 10:30 a.m.


12:00 p.m.


Phone: 928
-
523
-
6219


Course Prerequisites:
None.

Course Description:

This course examines the various aspects of environmental management within American Indian tribal governments,
including regulations, laws,
policies and programs particular to environmental management in a tribal administrative
setting. Students will explore environmental issues common in tribal communities, American Indian reservations and
Indian Country (as defined by federal law), and uniq
ue jurisdictional aspects of managing environmental programs on
tribal lands.

Student Learning Expectations/Outcomes for the Course:




Students will develop an understanding of the various laws, policies, regulations, common, and
unique issues and aspects

of managing environmental programs within American Indian tribal
g
overnments and on tribal lands, including CERCLA, NEPA, RCRA and EPA’s Tribal Treatment as States
policy.




Students will understand the unique challenges associated with tribal environmenta
l programs, and
the federal resources available to assist tribes in development and administration of their own
environ
mental programs and departments, including jurisdictional issues on the various legal land
statuses within tribal jurisictional areas, an
d the sometimes contradictory roles of the Bureau of Indian
Affairs in resolving tribal environmental issues.




Students will have
examine
d

various tribal environmental programs

such as the General Assistance
Program and the Native American Environmental
Lands Mitigation Program,
and develop
ed

a project
that profiles one particular tribal environmental program and
analyzed

various functions of the
program and how it interfaces with federal agencies, laws and regulations.


Course Structure/App
roach

:

The c
ourse utilizes lecture content, videos, group discussions, and project work. The
course is delivered online.


Required Texts:


Course Pack

Effective Fall 2012

Electronic readings [ER} as indicated (articles, book chapters, and links to tribal environmental programs and
feder
al agency websites


Course Outline

Section I. (Weeks 1
-
3)


Reading: Course pack Section I, electronic readings and websites included in Module 1.

The Unique Legal and Political Position of Federally
-
Recognized American Indian Tribal Nations



Brief
overview of federal Indian policy and implications for environmental management within and
adjacent to tribal lands



Alaskan Natives



EO 12898


Environmental Justice



EO 13175
-

Consultation and Coordination with American Indian Tribes



EO 13007


Indian Sacr
ed Sites



EPA and Tribes


Treatment as States, Roles of EPA, Tribes, Others



EPA’s Tribal Environmental Office

o

EPA’s Tribal Policy

o

EPA’s Tribal Portal

Discussion board posting #1 due end of week two

Reading response #1 due end of week three

Section II.
(Weeks 2
-
6) Laws & Regulations

Reading: Section II of the course pack and web links to agency and tribal websites included in Module 2.


o

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)

o

The Clean Air Act

tribal implementation

o

The Clean Water Act


tribal im
plementation

o

Tribal Water Rights

o

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)


Solid and Hazardous Waste Programs


tribal implementation and application

o

Toxic Substances Control Act


tribal implementation

o

Endangered Species Acts


tribal implementation

and application

o

Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act

o

Emergency Planning and Response and Community Right
-
to
-
Know Programs

o

Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Ac t (CERCLA

also known as Superfund)

Midterm Exam


O
pens Friday of week 6, closes Thursday of Week 7 in Bb Learn

Discussion board posting #2 due end of week four

Reading response #2 due Wednesday of week five

Discussion board posting #3 due end of week six


Effective Fall 2012

Section III. (Weeks 7
-

12) Compliance and Enforce
ment



Reading: Course pack Section 3 electronic readings and websites included in Module 3.

o

Drinking Water

and Water Resources

o

Air Quality

o

Waste Management and Waste Water

o

Pesticides and Toxic Substances

o

LUSTs

o

Health Care

o

Buildings and Vehicles

o

Public
Safety

o

Pollution Prevention and Green Purchasing

o

Tribal Enterprises


Outline for Tribal Environmental Program Profile and Analysis assignment due end of week seven

Discussion board #4 posting due end of week eight

Reading response #3 due Wednesday of week

10

Discussion board posting #5 due end of week 11

Reading response #4 due end of week 12

Section IV. (Weeks 13


15) EPA’s and Other Tribal Programs



Reading: Course pack Section 4, electronic readings and websites included in Module 4.

o

EPA’s General As
sistance Program (GAP)

o

Native American Environmental Lands Management Program (NALEMP)

o

National EPA Tribal Science Council

Tribal Environmental Program Profile and Analysis due Friday of Week 15

Week Sixteen


Reading Week


Wrap up and review

Week
Seventeen


Finals Week


Final exam opens Monday of this week at 8 a.m., closes Thursday at 2:30 p.m.




Effective Fall 2012

Evaluation & Assessment:

There are two exams (one midterm and a final exam), four reading responses (1 page), five discussion board postings,
and one t
erm project (a tribal environmental program profile and analysis

see requirements in “Assignments” module
for details).



Midterm Exam



100 points



Final Exam



125 points



Reading Responses (15 pts. ea.)


60 points



Discussion Boards (5 pts. ea.)


2
5 points



Tribal Environmental Program

Profile & Analysis



90 points

Total Points Possible:




400 points


Grading Scale:



A = 90 % and above



B = 80


89.9%



C= 70


79.9%



D= 60
-
69.9%



F= Below 60%

NORTHERN ARIZONA UNI
VERSITY

POLICY STATEMENTS

SAFE ENVIRONMENT POL
ICY

NAU’s Safe Working and Learning Environment Policy seeks to prohibit discrimination and promote the safety of all individuals

within the university. The goal of this policy is to
prevent the occurrence of discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, age,
national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, or veteran status and to prevent sexual harassment, sexual assault

or retaliation
by anyone at this university.

You m
ay obtain a copy of this policy from the college dean’s office or from the NAU’s Affirmative Action website
http://home.nau.edu/diversity/.

If you have concerns about this policy, it is important that you con
tact the departmental chair, dean’s
office, the Office of Student Life (928
-
523
-
5181), or NAU’s Office of Affirmative Action (928
-
523
-
3312).

STUDENTS WITH DISABI
LITIES

If you have a documented disability, you can arrange for accommodations by contacting Di
sability Resources (DR) at 523
-
8773
(voice) or 523
-
6906 (TTY),
dr@nau.edu

(e
-
mail)or 928
-
523
-
8747 (fax).Students needing academic accommodations are required to
register with DR and provide required disability related doc
umentation. Although you may request an accommodation at any time, in
order for DR to best meet your individual needs, you are urged to register and submit necessary documentation (
www.nau.edu/dr
) 8
weeks prior to the

time you wish to receive accommodations. DR is strongly committed to the needs of student with disabilities and
the promotion of Universal Design. Concerns or questions related to the accessibility of programs and facilities at NAU may b
e
brought to the a
ttention of DR or the Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity (523
-
3312).



Effective Fall 2012


INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW

BOARD

Any study involving observation of or interaction with human subjects that originates at NAU

including a course project, report, or
research
paper

must be reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) for the protection of human subjects in
research and research
-
related activities.


The IRB meets monthly. Proposals must be submitted for review at least fifteen working days befo
re the monthly meeting. You
should consult with your course instructor early in the course to ascertain if your project needs to be reviewed by the IRB a
nd/or to
secure information or appropriate forms and procedures for the IRB review. Your instructor a
nd department chair or college dean
must sign the application for approval by the IRB. The IRB categorizes projects into three levels depending on the nature of

the
project: exempt from further review, expedited review, or full board review. If the IRB
certifies that a project is exempt from further
review, you need not resubmit the project for continuing IRB review as long as there are no modifications in the exempted pro
cedures.



A copy of the IRB Policy and Procedures Manual is available in each depa
rtment’s administrative office and each college dean’s
office or on their website:
http://www.research.nau.edu/compliance/irb/index.aspx
. If you have questions, contact the IRB
Coordina
tor in the Office of the Vice President for Research at 928
-
523
-
8288 or 523
-
4340.


ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

The university takes an extremely serious view of violations of academic integrity. As members of the academic community, NA
U’s
administration, faculty
, staff and students are dedicated to promoting an atmosphere of honesty and are committed to maintaining the
academic integrity essential to the education process. Inherent in this commitment is the belief that academic dishonesty in

all forms
violates t
he basic principles of integrity and impedes learning. Students are therefore responsible for conducting themselves in an
academically honest manner.


Individual students and faculty members are responsible for identifying instances of academic dishonesty
. Faculty members then
recommend penalties to the department chair or college dean in keeping with the severity of the violation. The complete poli
cy on
academic integrity is in Appendix G of NAU’s Student Handbook
http://www4.nau.edu/stulife/handbookdishonesty.htm
.


ACADEMIC CONTACT HOU
R POLICY

The Arizona Board of Regents Academic Contact Hour Policy (ABOR Handbook, 2
-
206, Academic Credit) states: “an hour of work
is the equivalent of 5
0 minutes of class time…at least 15 contact hours of recitation, lecture, discussion, testing or evaluation, seminar,
or colloquium as well as a minimum of 30 hours of student homework is required for each unit of credit.”


The reasonable interpretation of

this policy is that for every credit hour, a student should expect, on average, to do a minimum of two
additional hours of work per week; e.g., preparation, homework, studying.

SENSITIVE COURSE MAT
ERIALS

If an instructor believes it is appropriate, the sy
llabus should communicate to students that some course content may be considered
sensitive by some students.


“University education aims to expand student understanding and awareness. Thus, it necessarily involves engagement with a wi
de
range of informati
on, ideas, and creative representations. In the course of college studies, students can expect to encounter

and
critically appraise

materials that may differ from and perhaps challenge familiar understandings, ideas, and beliefs. Students are
encouraged
to discuss these matters with faculty.”