RFID Mobile Phone

inspectorwormsElectronics - Devices

Nov 27, 2013 (3 years and 11 months ago)

79 views

RFID
Mobile
Phone

All cell phones will come packed with an RFID chip by next summer


giving your phone the
possibility of becomin
g
a real
-
time assistant for your food shopping.

-

Aalto Service Camp 2010
-

Group 3


RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) is
a kind of super
-
barcode for the 21st century. An RFID
tag is a tiny object that can be attached to anything, and which contains information that

can be
read by an RFID reader.

Unlike a barcode, however, the information encoded into the tag can also
be wri
tten to.

In this article, we explore the possibility of enabling mobile phone to equip RFID
reader
to access ambient information, especially food information in super market.

1.

Introduction

Radio
-
frequency identification (
RFID
)

is a generic term that is us
ed to describe a system tha
t
transmits the identity

of an object
(e.g., food, animal, clothes, etc
.
)
wirelessly

using radio waves.

Unlike ubiquitous
Universal Product C
ode

barcode technology
, RFID technology requires no
contact or line of sight for communi
cation.
Fig. 1
shows

an example of a RFID tag.

It is a kind of
microchip with the half size of grain sand. It works with listening for the radio query and then
responds by transmitting its unique code of ID. Without battery, it uses initial radio signal as

power.



Fig. 1: An example of a RFID tag



Fig. 2:
A simplified m
obile
RFID system


RFID system

consists of two

components:

A RFID tag and a RFID reader.

A basic mobile
device based RFID system is illustrated in Fig. 2
.

Thei
r functions are explained as follows:



RFID Tag

Most RFID tags contain at least two parts: One is an int
egrated circuit for storing/
processing
information

and modulating/demodulating a radio frequency; and the second is an antenna for
receiving and transmit
ting the signal.

There are two basic
types of RFID tags: A
ctive RFID tags
which contains a battery and can transmit signals autonomously and passive RFID tags which
have no battery and require an external source to provoke signal transmission.
The RFID tag
s
use
d

in food

industry are passive RFID tags because of their sm
all size and non battery
requirement
.

The RFID tag stuck on t
he outer packing of the potato

contains necessary
information, e.g.,
food name, weight,
production date

and expiration date.

When
an
RFID tag

passes through the electromagnetic zone, it detects the reader's activation
signal and sends the
necessary information to the RFID reader.



RFID
Reader

A

RFID reader
equipped in the mobile device

is used to in
terrogate an
RFID tag
. The reader
has an antenna that emits radio waves; the tag responds by sending back its data.
The reader emits
radio waves in ranges of anywhere from one i
nch to 100 feet or more, depending upon its power
output and the
radio frequency

used
.

2.

RFID on Mobile Phones

We all possess a cell phone and it has become a part of our daily lives. Let's see what we
generally do with ou
r cell phone
-

make calls, SMS, play games, capture images, probably this is
what we all can think of but ever imagined a cell phone that can read and write RFID tags,
capture data from medical devices and run applications on the handset that interact with

backend
servers.

What if the phone could be used
as an RFID reader allowing
the mobile phone
to interact

with RFID
-
enabled objects

like asset tracking, patient identification and food
identification

in
super market?

In this section, we explore the existin
g RFID phones

and their future

in the mobile
phone industry.

a)

Nokia

RFID Phone

Nokia
has
begun

to implement RFID technology to their handset products

for a couple of years
already
. So far RFID has been applied to the goods, pet, paper money and so on.


Fig
. 2:
T
he first RFID phone in the world


At the CeBIT 2004 trade show in Hannover Germany, Nokia launched the mobile RFID Kit for
the Nokia 5140 handset
, Fig. 2
. It is the first integrated RFID solution for a mobile GSM phone.
Mobile workforces can launch s
ervices by simply touching RFID tags with their mobile phones.
Nokia has also published RFID kit that enable users to design simple applications for RFID usage.
The Nokia RFID Kit is compliant with the MIFARE UltraLight RFID protocol and
reads

i
n the
range

of 2
-
5

cm.
Nokia 3220 is the second
RFID Nokia phone

in 2005
. It is capable of reading
any RFID tags and writing to an RFID information tag.
T
he field reaches about 10 cm

from the
reader.

The other Nokia phones with inte
grated RFID reader include
6131

(20
07)
, 6212
(2008)
and so on
.

Nokia is also providing an infrastructure on which to build and deploy applications. In order to
write apps to run on the handset they have got a Local Interactive Java SDK. As regards the
server side they provide connections t
o an SMS gateway, provide tag, location event data,
authentication and authorization, client provisioning and administration. The company is planning
to sell the phones through special health care resellers. The phone and the related infrastructure
are bei
ng made available in the U.S. on a pilot project basis.

b)

iPhone

with RFID

Reader

It is

only natural for Apple to do something unless they want to lose a big portion of the market.

Apple have
submitted for several patents involving iPhone RFID, which will al
lows users to scan
a tags by simply pointing out to them.

There have been a few rumors that the next generation Apple iPhone may contain a built in RFID
tag reader.
Apple ‘‘suggests’’ that a RFID antenna could be placed in the touch sensor panel itself,
a
llowing it to also be used as a RFID reader. As RFID tags become more common, this could add
a useful function to future touch s
creen devices
.

Before the next iPhone with integrated RFID
reader is released, some RFID add
-
ons for iPhone are also amazing and

promising.


Fig.
4
:
DIY iPhone RFID reader


Instead of waiting for this magical technology to appear on the next iPhone though, a research
assistant at CASA/University College London has managed to buil
d his own RFID iPhone
accessory

as shown in
Fig.

4
.

His

solution reads RFID data but can't write it yet, which means it
can't be used to open doors at the moment but it does demo how the iPhone could interact with
external objects.

It's worth noting that last April a team of researchers at the Oslo School
of Architecture & Design
(OSAD) demoed an iPhone RFID reader and later that year a company called Wireless Dynamics
announced an RFID iPhone and iPod Tou
ch accessory called the iCarte.

We can see from the
Fig.

5

that the device adds RFID functionality to t
he iPhone via the dock connector, to which it
connects without adding too much bulk or without being too much of an eyesore. In fact, it looks
like the iCarte’s designers went out of their way to make sure the add
-
on looks like it’s a natural
extension of
the iPhone itself, rather than an apparent third
-
party accessory.


Fig.
5
:
iCarte



a natural
RFID
extension of iPhone


2010 could be a great year for RFID in the consumer market, if it is to be a feature of the next
iPhone

and Nokia phone
. Expect to see

it in Android devices too.

c)

Samsung
RFID
mobile device

Samsung Electronics Co., announced
in 2007

the development of its new single
-
chip radio
frequency identification (RFID) reader for mobile devices. Embedded RFID reader chips can
provide consumers with
product or service information retrieved from RFID tags incorporated in
items such as movie posters, clothing, and museums or tourist exhibits.

According to market research firm RoA Group, the global demand for mobile RFID is expected
to grow from $26.9 bi
llion in 2007 to $701 billion by 2010, for a compound annual growth of 196
percent.

While it can be embedded into devices such as mobile handsets and handheld readers used in
retail stores, initially the major application for Samsung's new RFID reader chip

is expected to be
in card
-
type readers that plug into mobile handsets. This will provide consumers with immediat
e
access to the new technology.

Designed for a UHF range of 900MHz, Samsung's new chip integrates an analog front end, a
base
-
band modem, a pro
cessor, and a memory chip. The chip's 6.5mm x 6.5mm small form factor
and ultra low power consumption level of 850mW are ideal for mobile applications.

3.

RFID in the Retail Food Industry

RFID

is being widely promoted as the next great solution

for the retail

food industry.
Much
of this hype is the result of the largest mass retailer requiring RFID tagged product

from their
largest suppliers.

RFID is pure and simply a data or in
formation collection approach.
The promise
is it collects data for computers faster
, easier and with improved accuracy.

Retailers such as Best
Buy, Metro, Target, Tesco and Wal
-
Mart are in the forefront of RFID adoption. These retailers
are currently focused on improving supply chain efficiency and making sure product is on the
shelf whe
n customers want to buy it.