PS MSc Biomedical Sciences 2012 - staffcentral - University of ...

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Feb 20, 2013 (4 years and 10 months ago)

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PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

Final


PART 1: COURSE SUMMARY INFORMATION


Course summary

Final a
ward

MSc
Biomedical Sciences

Intermediate award

Postgraduate Diploma Biomedical Sciences

Postgraduate Certificate Biomedical Sciences

Course status

Validated

Awarding body

University of Brighton

Faculty

Science and Engineering

School

Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Location of study/ campus

Moulsecoomb
-

Brighton

Partner institution(s)

Name of institution

Host department

Course status

1.












SELECT


2.













3
.













Admissions

Admissions agency

Direct to School

Entry requirements

Include any progression opportunities
into the course.

BSc or equivalent in biomedical science, biological science or related
disci
pline (2:2 or better, or equivalent).

IELTS 6.5 overall, no component below 6.0.

Start date (mmm
-
yy)

Normally September

Sep
-
12

Mode of
study

Mode of study

Duration of study (standard)

Maximum registration period

Full
-
time

1 year








6 years







Part
-
time

2 years







6 years







Sandwich

Select







Select







Distance

Select







Select







Course
codes/categories

UCAS code

N A

Contacts

Course Leader (or Course
Development Leader)

Dr Stuart James

Admissions Tutor

Dr Stuart James

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Examination and Assessment

External Examiner(s)

Name

Place of work

Date tenure expires

Dr Simon Oldroyd

De Montfort University

November 2012

Examination Board(s)
(AEB/CEB)

Industrial and Biomedical PG AEB

PG CEB

Approval and review



Approval date

Review date

Validation

March 2000

March 2015

Programme Specification

May 2012

May 2013

Professional, Statutory and
Regulatory Body

1 (if
applicable)
:






NA

at present






1

Professional, Statutory and
Re
gulatory Body

2 (if
applicable)
:


















Professional, Statutory and
Regulatory Body

3 (if
applicable)
:





















1

Date of most recent review by accrediting/ approving external body.

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PART
2
: COURSE

DETAILS


AIMS AND LEARNING OUTCOMES

Aims

The aims of the
course

are

to
:



impart a knowledge and understanding

of the role of molecular, cellular and organ level biological
processes in the initiation and development of disease processes;



provide the student with an appreciation of how intervention in these biological mechanisms may
lead to cure or amelioration of

the disease;



enable students to develop and apply knowledge and skills in a specialised area of the Biomedical
Sciences (NB
-

In these papers the terms Biomedical Sciences and Biomedical Scientist are used in
their wider sense, not in the sense in which th
ey are employed in the NHS);



enable students to develop expertise in reflective practice, quality control and research in a
biomedical laboratory setting;



enable students to improve their critical appraisal skills through examination of current issues in
b
iomedical science and healthcare and to communicate their findings appropriately.



Encourage students to take responsibility for their own learning, and to create a basis for life
-
long
learning and development.



equip students for careers as biomedical
scientists in areas such as the Diagnostics Industry, the
Biotechnology industry, the Pharmaceutical Industry and Academia
.

Learning outcomes

The outcomes

of the
main award

provide information about how the primary aims are demonstrated by
students following the
course
. These are mapped to external reference points where appropriate
2
.

Knowledge and theory

Learning outcomes, listed below, are achieved through the programme o
f
specified modules. Individual module outcomes detail generic and subject
specific knowledge and skills appropriate to the level of study. Criteria used to
define and assess level of learning are as given in the Faculty Grading
Descriptor.

By the end of t
he course students will have developed a systematic
knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of problems in the following
specific areas:

1.

underlying pathobiology of selected disease states within the Bi
omedical
Model of Disease
;

2.

principles and
practice of examples of current biological analytical
techniques in the biomedical sciences, and fut
ure potential in this area
;

3.

current and emerging techniques in molecular and cell biology, and their
novel applications to laboratory investigatio
n and diag
nosis
;

4.

principles of pharmacological intervention in disease processes;

5.

original research project design, based upon novel hypotheses, and
analysis, with appropriate ethics committee consent

and within the
Human Tissues Act and other legal frameworks
;

6.

reflective practice in a biomedical setting.

Skills

Includes intellectual skills (i.e.
generic skills relating to
academic study, problem
so
lving, evaluation, research
et
c
.
) and professional/
practical skills.

1.

Evaluation, analysis, interpretation and
problem solving in biomedically
relevant complex situations, wit
h and without complete data;

2.

Reflective practice skills developed within reflective pract
ice components
of modules;

3.

Skills in the application of knowledge and understanding of selected
disease

states and therapies such that evaluative procedures in
laboratory diagnostic tests and

techniques may be devised;

4.

Application of specialized knowledge to design investig
ative laboratory
protocols;

5.

Planning, organization and time management in research pr
oject, case
study and reflective practice work, both as part of a team, and

in a self
-
directed manner;

6.

Communicating scientific knowledge and ideas in wri
tten and oral
presentations.




2

Please refer to
Course Development and Review Handbook

or QAA website for details.

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QAA subject benchmark
statement (where
applicable)
3

No QAA Benchmark currently exists for Biomedical Science at Masters level.
However, this degree is designed with the contents of
Master’s Degree
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PROFESSIONAL, STATUTORY AND REGULATORY BODIES (
where applicable
)

Where a
course is accredited by a PSRB, full details of how the course meets external requirements,
and what students are required to undertake,
are
included.

The course is currently
being
submitted to The Institute of Biomedical Sciences for accreditation.


LEARNING AND TEACHING

Learning and teaching

methods

This section sets out the primary learning and teaching methods, including total learning hours and any
specific requirements in
terms of practical/ clinical
-
based learning. The indicative list of learning and
teaching methods includes information on the proportion of the course delivered by each method and
details where a particular method relates to a particular element of the co
urse.

The course aims to provide a wide range of learning experiences for the student so that students with
different learning styles may benefit, and extension of these to other styles will be encouraged.


Learning and Teaching Method

% of Student Effort

Lectures

15
%

Tutorials

4
%

Practicals

and lab
-
based P
roject

35
%

Reflective written work

5%

Workshops

3%

Students centred study

35%

Web lectures

3%



ASSESSMENT

Assessment

methods

This section sets out the summative a
ssessment methods on the
course

and
includes details on where
to find further information on the criteria used in assessing coursework. It also provides
an assessment
matrix which reflects the variety of modes of assessment, and the volume of assessment in the course.

All module
s are assessed using the assessment criteria detailed on the individual modules descriptions,
which are linked to the learning outcomes for that module as stated in the module descriptor. All students
will encounter the following general types of assessmen
t:



case
-
study and problem
-
based assignments



reflective portfolios
-

these will be used both summatively and formatively



project viva voce



written examinations



oral
and poster
presentations


used both summatively and formatively



web lecture tests
-

used fo
rmatively only



mini
-
projects



research proposal



research project dissertation


Learning Outcome

Assessment m
e
thod

Module

LO 1

Exam; Problem Based Assessments; case
BYM50; P
YM61




3

Please refer to the QAA website for details.


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studies; formative tests

BYM41, BYM42,

BYM47
, BYM4
8

LO2

Exam; oral
presentations


BYM04; BYM50;
BY344; BYM
37

LO3

Exam; Mini
-
projects

BYM04

LO4

Exam; Case Studies

P
YM61

LO5

Research Proposal

BYM35

LO6

Reflective portfolio

BYM06; BYM41,
BYM42,
BYM47
,
BYM4
8

SLO1

Dissertation; Viva voce

BYM91

SLO2

Portfolio

BYM35: BYM50

SLO3

Mini
-
projects; Case Studies; PBA

BYM04; BYM50;
BYM
37; BYM41;
BYM42; BYM47
;
BYM4
8

SLO4

Case studies

BYM04

SLO5

and 6

Reflective portfolio; Dissertation; Case Studies

BYM91



SUPPORT AND INFORMATION

Institutional/ University

All students benefit
from:

University induction week


Student Handbook
: the University and you

Course Handbook

Extensive library facilities

Computer pool rooms

E
-
mail address

Welfare service

Personal tutor for advice and guidance

Course
-
specific

Additional support,
specifically
where courses have non
-
traditional patterns of delivery
(e.g. distance learning and
work
-
based learning) include:

In addition, students on this course benefit from:


Studentcentral
, learning guides announcements etc
.
Specialist facilities

inc
luding dedicated labs in areas such as cell culture and molecular biology

Specialist software

including
protein and DNA mining software


Research Informed teaching

Teaching is informed by research of very high quality. In the 2008 RAE the
school scored 80%

research of international quality of which 15% was
internationally leading.
This course is delivered by research
-
active academic
staff, and specialist aspects of the curriculum reflect the research interests of
these staff. For example,

a number of the op
tions modules, such as Diabetes,
Oxidative Stress, Biomaterials and Medical Genetics are specifically bu
ilt
around, and taught by, the
research groups within the School. Similarly, core
modules are delivered by both staff who are research active within the

fields
of biomedical science, and staff who are Registered Biomedical Scientists,
who also undertake research within and external to the University.

The
integration of research and study is particularly strong in the project, where
students spend an exten
ded period of time (usually the summer period)
undertaking research with one of our staff, in many instances, supported by a
larger research group. Students are prepared to undertake this role
throughout the course, but particularly

in the Research
Methods module,
where they have to successfully complete a project proposal to pass that
module
.


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Sustainable development

The University’s Sustainable Development Policy has been taken into
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the UK Government Sustainable Development Strategy (2005) of ‘using
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University’s view of sustainable development as applied to the whole course
may be summarised as ‘fitness for purpose’. That is, will the course provide
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PART 3
: COURSE

SPECIFIC REGULATIONS


COURSE STRUCTURE

This section includes an outline of
the structure of the programme, including stages
of study and
progression points. Course Leaders may choose to include a structure diagram here.

The c
ourse is structured around the 5 compulsory modules which provide the basis in Biomedical
Sciences upon which a series of option modules can be built, ac
cording to the needs and interests of
individual students, as well as providing the background in research methods necessary to complete the
research project.


Sem 1

P
YM61

Topics in
Biomedical
Sciences and
Pharmacology

(first 1
0
credits)

BYM50

Cell
Pathology
and Special
Topics in
Pathobiology

(f
irst 1
0
credits)

BYM35

Research
Methods

(e
xtensive 1
0
credits)

BYM04

Applied
Molecular
Biology

(f
irst 1
0
credits)

Two

optional
module
s

from
-

BYM37;
BYM41;
BYM4
7
;

BYM06; BY344

(2
0 credits)



Sem 2

P
YM61

Topics

in
Biomedical
Sciences and
Pharmacology

(second 10
credits)


BYM50

Cell
Pathology
and Special
Topics in
Pathobiology

(s
econd 1
0
credits)

BYM35


Research
Methods

(i
ntensive 10
credits)

BYM04

Applied
Molecular
Biology

(s
econd 1
0
credits)

Two option
modules

from
-

available PYM
options; BYM4
2
;
BYM4
8
;BYM06;
PL317

(2
0 credits)



BYM91


Project

(60 credits)


Sem 3


See below for option module titles.



Intensive week held in

Christmas vacation
-

assessment submitted in Sem 2.


Any other suitable
optional module may be s
elected at

the discretion of the Course Leader.


Research project will normally be undertaken in the period Christmas to September.

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NOTE
-

The course structure is designed to facilitate, should a student so wish, specialisation in Bl
ood
Sciences, Infection Sciences or Cell Pathology. For instance, a student interested in Blood Sciences
would take the Haematology option in Sem 1, The Clinical Biochemistry option in Sem 2, Possibly the
Final Year Undergraduate double module in Blood Sci
ences if they felt their undergraduate Blood
Sciences needed revision

(or possible Clinical Immunology)
, plus a Project in the Blood Sciences
(i
.
e
.

100 of the 180 credits in Blood Science)
. A similar combination would be available for, for instance,
Infecti
on Science students. Clearly, should a student so wish, they can draw upon a mixture of modules
from these specialisms

to give a more general Masters in Biomedical Science
, perhaps including, for
instance, BYM06 Lab Management.


Modules

Level
4


Module
code

Status

Module title

7

P
YM61

C

Topics in Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacology

7

BYM9
1

C

Project

7

BYM50

C

Cell Pathology and Special Topics in Pathobiology

7

BYM04

C

Applied Molecular Biology

7

BYM35

C

Research Methods

7

BYM
4
1

O

Clinical
I
nfection S
ciences

7

BYM
4
2

O

Infection Control
and Public H
ealth
(with clin
ical

micro
biology

considered
as Infection Sciences)

7

BYM
4
7

O

Haematology

7

BYM
4
8

O

Clinical Biochemistry (with Haematology considered as Blood Sciences)

7

BYM06

O

Service
Delivery in Clin
ical

P
ath
ology

7

BYM
37

O

Medical genetics

7

PYM05

O

Diabetes Mellitus

7

PYM06

O

Oxidative Stress and Disease

7

BYM32

O

Biomaterials

6

BY327

O

Blood Sciences

6

BY344

O

Clinical and applied Immunology

6

PL317

O

Neurobiology

6

BY313

O

Microbial Control

Note
-

Students may take
a maximum of

30 credits of level 6 modules as part of the MSc.

Status:

M = Mandatory (modules which must be taken and passed to be eligible for the award)

C = Compulsory (modules which must be taken to be
eligible for the award)

O = Optional (optional modules)

A = Additional (modules which must be taken to be eligible for an award accredited by a professional,
statutory or regulatory body, including any non
-
credit bearing modules)






4

All modules have learning outcomes commensurate with the FHEQ levels 0, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8. List
the
level
which
corresponds with the learning outcomes of each module.

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AWARD AND
CLASSIFICATION

Award type

Award*

Title

Level

Eligibility for award

Classification of award

Tota
l

credits
5

Minimum credits
6

Ratio of marks
7
:

Class of award

Final

MSc

Biomedical Sciences

7

Total c
redit
180







Minimum credit at level
of award
150







Level 7 marks

Postgraduate degree

Intermediate

PGDip

Biomedical Sciences

7

Total credit
120







Minimum credit at level
of award
90







Level 7 marks

Postgraduate (taught) degree

Intermediate

PGCert

Biomedical Sciences

7

Total credit
60







Minimum credit at level
of award
40







Level 7 marks

Postgraduate (taught) degree

Select













Select

Total credit
Select







Minimum credit at level
of award
Select







Select

Select

Select













Select

Total credit
Select







Minimum credit at level
of award
Select







Select

Select

*Foundation degrees only

Progression routes from award
:







Award classifications

Mark/ band %

Foundation degree

Honours degree

Postgraduate
8

degree (
excludes
PGCE and BM BS)

70%
-

100%

Distinction

First (1)

Distinction

60%
-

69.99%

Merit

Upper second
(2:1)

Merit

50%
-

59.99%

Pass

Lower second (2:2)

Pass

40%
-

49.99%

Third

(3)







5

Total number of credits required to be eligible for the award.

6

Minimum number of cred
its required, at level of award, to be eligible for the award.

7

Algorithm used to determine the classification of the final award (all marks are credit
-
weighted).

For a Masters degree, the mark for the final element (e.g, dissertation) must be in the cor
responding
class of award.

8

Refers to taught provision:
PG Cert, PG Dip, Masters.

Document template revised: 2010


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EXAMINATION AND ASSESSMENT REGULATIONS

Please refer to the
Course Approval and Review Handbook

when completing this section.


The
examination and assessment regulations
for the course
should be in accordance with the
University’s General Examination and Assessment Regulations for Taught Courses

(available
from staffcentral or studentcentral).

Spec
ific regulations
which
materially

affect
assessment,
prog
ression and award
on the course

e.g. Where referrals or repeat
of modules are not permitted
in line with the University’s
General Examination and
Assessment Regulations for
Taught Courses.


Exceptions required by
PSRB

These require the approval of
the Chair of the Academic
Board
































Faculty of Science and Engineering

October
2012