Interdisciplinary Writing Unit: Expository, Second Grade

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Interdisciplinary Writing Unit: Expository, Second Grade

Kayla Lear

READ 7140

Valdosta State University

Summer 2011




















Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
2


Interdisciplinary Writing Unit: Student Characteristics and Individual Differences


Genre
: ___
Expository/Informational____

Form
:

____
Report_________________

C
ontent area
: __
Social Studies___________
__________

Grade
: ___
2
nd
_____

Content
t
opic
/concept
:

____
Georgia Piedmont
____________


A.

Number of students
(specific to lesson)



Number of boys ___
12
_____



Number of girls ___
8
_____


B. Ethnicity (
number

of students)
(specific to lesson)



_
6
___ African
-
American



__
0
__ Asian
-
American



__
0
__ Native American



__
3
__ Hispanic



__
9
__ Caucasian



__
2
__ Multi
-
racial


C. Reading Achievement: (
number

of students)

Identify sources of data
: _______CRCT
_________________________



__
6
____ Exceeds standards



__
9
__
__ Meets standards



___
5
___ Does not meet standards




__
0
____ Students for whom no data are available


D.

Writing

Achievement (
number

of students)

Identify

sources of data:

_______
CRCT______
_______________



_
5
___ Exceeds standards



_
12
___ Meets standard



_
3
___ Does not meet standards



__
0
__ Students for whom no data are available


E.

Language Proficiency (
number

of students)



__
18
__ English language



__
2
__
English Language Learner (ELL)



__
0
__ Sign language



List languages other than English
:
______
Spanish
________________



Students Identified and Receiving Services (
number

of students)



__
6
__ Title I



__
3
__ Gifted



__
4
__ Early Intervention Program (EIP)



____
Safety Net



__
2
__ ESOL



____ Reading Recovery



____ Other



Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
3


I.

Students with Individualized Education Programs (IEP) (
number

of students)



__
0
__ Visual impairment/Blindness



__
0
__ Deaf / Hard of hearing



__
0
__ Deaf/Blind



__
0
__ Significant developmental delay



__
0
__ Emotional and Behavioral Disorder (EBD)



__
1
__ Specific learning disability (LD)



__
0
__ Intellectual disability



__
0
__ Other health impairment (OHI)
-
ADHD



__
0
__ Orthopedic Impairment (OI)



__
0
__ Speech/language impairment



__
0
__ Autism



__
0
__ Traumatic brai
n injury (TBI)



__
0
__ Other


II.

Students with Other Education Plans

(
number

of students)



_
0
___ SST



_
0
___ 504



_
1
___ RTI



_
0
___ Other



























Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
4


Student I
nterest Survey


P
lease circle yes or no for
question
s 1
-
6 and answer questions 7
-
10.


1.

I
like writing stories. Yes/No

2. Writing is boring. Yes/No

3.

I like to write notes to my friends. Yes/No

4.

I like
texting and emailing my friends
. Yes/No


5
.

I think it is fun to write at home. Yes/No

6
. I think I am a good writer. Yes/No

7. What is your

favorite thing to do after school?
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________.

8. What is your favorite food?
__________________________________________________________
_____________
_____________________________________________.

9. Who is your favorite person in the world? Why?
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________.

10. What is your favorite television show
?
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________.


Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
5


Georgia Writing Test

Grade 3:


Impact:


This unit will be beneficial for my students by preparing them for the Georgia Writing
Test that they will take in third grade. The Georgia Writing Test includes informational writing
in which my unit is based. This unit will give the students information
on what informational
writing is and this unit will provide the students with sequential steps they will need when
writing an informational piece.

Description



The writing assessment for grade three consists of
teacher evaluation

of student writing
using

an analytic scoring system. The
Grade 3 Assessment and Instructional Guide

contains the
scoring rubric; types of writing required by the GPS (narrative, informational, persuasive and
response to literature); good practices for the instruction of writing; sample student papers; and
ways to evaluate student writing. Using represen
tative samples of student writing, third
-
grade
teachers are to use the analytic scoring rubrics in the
Guide

to determine the performance levels
in each domain for each child in the classroom. Teachers collect writing samples by providing
many opportunitie
s for students to produce the various types of writing throughout the year.
Types of Writing

The Georgia Grade Three Writing Assessment covers four types of writing: narrative,
informational
, persuasive, and response to literature.

1.

Narrative

o

Relating Perso
nal Experience
-
Writing assignments should direct students to recount
an event grounded in their own experiences. The assignment should elicit a story
with a plot and characters rather than a list.

o

Creating an Imaginative Story
-
Writing Assignments should di
rect students to
produce stories that are grounded in imagination or fantasy.

2.

Informational

o

Writing Assignments may be related to all content areas specified in the Grade
3 GPS and may be produced during content area instruction.

o

Writing assignments may be

related to any type of non
-
fiction writing whose
purpose is to inform or explain a topic to a reader.

o

Students should incorporate information from resources (books, on
-
line
sources, etc.) without copying the information verbatim.

o

Paraphrasing information
and using technical vocabulary from source material
is appropriate for the informational assessment sample.



For example, the informational samples collected for this guide on the
topic of minerals may use technical vocabulary such as igneous,
metamorphic,
or sedimentary rocks.

3.

Persuasive

o

The writing assignment should direct students to take a position on an issue or topic
that they are familiar with.

o

The assignment may occur after the class has researched the issue or read related
texts.

o

The assignment may
be part of a lesson on the issue in a particular content area

4.

Response to Literature

Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
6


o

The assignment should direct students to form and support a position in response to
a text they have read.

o

The assignment should be linked to a specific piece of literatur
e (short stories,
biographies, fables, plays, poetry, and chapter books).

o

Plot summaries or the retelling of an entire story are not appropriate responses to
literature.

Assessment
of Writing
:



Assessed analytically in four domains: Ideas, Organization,
Style, and Conventions.



Scoring rubrics are used to score each type of writing.



Samples are collected throughout the year; one assessment sample per genre per student.



Teachers may choose to use writing

prompts to assist in collecting

these samples, but the
writing should be completed independently by each student.


Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
7



Resource:

Ge
orgia Depart ment of Educat ion,

(2010).

Georgi a depart ment of

educat i on
-
assessment: grade 3 wri t i ng assessment
. Ret rieved from

ht t p://www.doe.k12.ga.us/c i_t
est i ng.asp x?Pa geReq=CITes t i ngWA3














Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
8


Introductory Material/Information on Writing Unit


I.

Genre and Form of Writing
: Informational
-
Report

II.

Content Area Connection
:

A.

Content Area
: Social Studies

B.

Content Area GPS
:


SS2G1

The student will locate major topographical features of Georgia and will


describe how these features define Georgia’s surface.


a. Locate all the geographic regions of Georgia: Blue Ridge Mountains, Piedmont,


Coastal Plain,
Valley and Ridge, an
d Appalachian Plateau
.


C.

Topic and/or Concept
:

Students will write an expository/informational report about
the Georgia Piedmont.

D.

Previous Content Area Lessons
:

Before beginning this writing unit,
the students will have studied t
he Blue Ridge
Mountains, G
eorgia Piedmont and Georgia Coastal Plain in depth in Social Studies
class. Students will have accessed informational websites about these topics and will
also have looked through books in the classroom library about these topics.


III.

English Language Arts G
PS
:

ELA2W2

The student writes in a variety of genres, including narrative,

informational, persuasive, and response to literature.

The student produces informational writing that:

b. Begins to sustain a focused topic.

c. Includes the appropriate purpose,
expectations, and length for the audience and genre.

d. Adds facts and details.

g. Uses a variety of resources (encyclopedia, Internet, books) to research and share

information on a topic.

i. May include pre
-
writing.

j. May include a draft that is revised

and edited.

k. May be published.


ELA2W1

The student begins to demonstrate competency in the writing process. The

student

a. Writes text of a length appropriate to address a topic and tell the story.

h. Pre
-
writes to generate ideas orally.

i. Uses planni
ng ideas to produce a rough draft.

k. Creates documents with legible handwriting.

l. Consistently writes in complete sentences with correct subject/verb agreement.

r. Uses appropriate capitalization and punctuation (periods, question and exclamation

marks
) at the end of sentences (declarative, interrogative, and exclamatory; simple

and compound).





Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
9



IV.

Explanation of Terms:

audience:

Sometimes students primarily write for themselves, to express and clarify their own
feelings, or they write for
others.(Tompkins 2012 p.7).


drafting:

This stage focuses on getting ideas down on paper with no regard for spelling or
grammar (Tompkins 2012 p. 8).


editing:

This stage focuses on spelling and grammar. The writer rereads the draft and corrects
spelling a
nd grammar errors
.

(Tompkins 2012 p. 12).


expository writing
:

A type of writing in which the author shares factual information.(Tompkins
2012 p.200).


genre:

A class

or

category

of

artistic

endeavor

having

a

particular form,

content or

technique.
(2008).


graphic organizer:

A tool used to organizer information prior to writing (Tompkins 2012
p.254).



interactive writing:

Teachers and students work together to compose a text, and both the
teacher and students serve as the scribe to record the text. (Tompki
ns 2012 p.50).


nonfiction:


W
riting that is about facts or real events
.
(2008).


prewriting:

Prewriting is the getting
-
ready
-
to
-
write stage. During prewriting, the author
chooses a topic, considers the purpose of writing, considers the audience reading
the piece,
considers the form of the story, and gathers and organizes ideas. (Tompkins 2012 p. 6)


publishing:

This is the final draft stage when children make a new copy using all revisions from
the rough draft. (Tompkins 2012 p. 15)
.


purpose:

Writers w
rite to inform, entertain and persuade. (Tompkins 2012 p. 15).


revising:

In this stage of the writing process, the author adds, substitutes, deletes, and moves
material
from one place to another. (Tompkins 2012 p. 11)


writing process:

The writing process

includes five stages: prewriting, drafting, revising, editing,
and publishing. (Tompkins 2012 p. 2).


Reference
s
:

Tompkins, G. (2012).
Teaching writing: balancing process and product
. Fresno, CA: Pearson.



(2008).

Merri am
-
Webst er’s

col l egi at e di ct i onary
.

Merriam Webst er.



Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
10




V.

Pre
-
assessment


Teacher’s Instructions:



Students will write an information piece for their pre
-
assessment.



Materials needed:



Wide Rule Paper

(4 pieces for each student)



Computer Paper

(1 piece for each student)



Pencils

(1 for each
student)



Verbal Prompt:



“Today, you will write an informational paper. This paper will not be graded but I will
use it to see what areas we still need to work on in our writing. Before you begin to write
on the topic I give you, brainstorm some ideas and p
lan your paper on this blank
computer paper. Then begin to write your paper on this notebook paper and remember to
skip lines. When you finish writing you may go back and make changes if you wish to.
Here is your writing prompt:


Write the story of your l
ife story! Include real facts like where and when you were
born and how many brothers and sisters you have. Write as much as you can!”




























Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
11


VI.

Grouping Arrangements

A.

Explanation of
Instructional

Grouping
:

Instruction:

Students will be taught using whole
-
group instruction during the genre/mode
section of instruction and the stage of writing instruction. Since all students will be taught
the writing process, whole
-
group will allow all students to be reached at one time,
which
will save time. Ornstein (1995) says, “Whole groups can be an economical and efficient
way of teaching. The method is especially convenient for teaching the same skills or
subject to the entire class.” This will also ensure the accuracy of delivery o
f instruction to
all students.

Practice:

The practice activities will be done in a whole group setting. The teacher and
students will be using interactive writing for each stage of the writing process so it only
makes sense that the class does this togeth
er.

Assessment:

Students will work individually on completing their informational report.
This will allow the teacher to determine which students may need more scaffolding in order
to master the different stages of the writing process.

B.
Explanation of G
rouping Options
Relating to Students’ Needs:


1.

Explanation of Grouping Options Relating to Students’ Developmental Needs:

For the

majority of each lesson,

the student with a specific learning disability will be
included in the whole group setting in which t
he instruction takes place. I will have this
student sit close to me while I teach so that I can provide assistance throughout the
lessons. During the prewriting assessment, the student will be seated with the teacher so
that he can dictate his response to

her. During the editing

and publishing

stage, the
student will be allowed to work on a computer.

2.

Explanation of Grouping Options Relating to Students’ Cultural or Linguistic
Needs:

For
the majority of each lesson
, the ELL students will be included in the

whole group
setting in which the instruction takes place. I will seat these students next to my
bilingual student so that they can provide clarification in Spanish if needed. During the
all assessments, the two ELL students will be seated together so that

they can help each
other translate their thoughts into English. I will also seat them close to my bilingual
student for additional support.
















Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
12


Name
: Kayla Lear



Grade
L
evel
: 2
nd



Stage of
W
riting
: Prewriting


Genre

and Form
of
W
riting
:
Informational
-

Individual Reports


Content area
: Social Studies


Topic and/or
C
oncept
:

Before beginning this writing unit,
the students will have studied t
he Blue Ridge Mountains,
Georgia Piedmont and Georgia Coastal Plain in depth in Social Studies class
. Students will have
accessed informational websites about these topics and will also have looked through books in
the classroom library about these topics.

Content Area GPS
:

SS2G1 The student will locate major topographical features of Georgia and will

describe how these features define Georgia’s surface.

a. Locate all the geographic regions of Georgia: Blue Ridge Mountains, Piedmont,

Coastal Plain,
Valley and Ridge, and Appalachian Plateau
.


English Language Arts GPS
:

ELA2W2

The student writes in a v
ariety of genres, including narrative,

informational, persuasive, and response to literature.

The student produces informational writing that:

b. Begins to sustain a focused topic.

c. Includes the appropriate purpose,
expectations, and length

for the audi
ence and genre.

d. Adds facts and details.

g. Uses a variety of resources (encyclopedia, Internet, books) to research and share

information on a topic.

i. May include pre
-
writing.

j. May include a draft that is revised and edited.

k. May be published.


ELA2W1

The student begins to demonstrate competency in the writing process. The

student

a. Writes text of a length appropriate to address a topic and tell the story.

h. Pre
-
writes to generate ideas orally.

i. Uses planning ideas to produce a rough draft.

k. Creates documents with legible handwriting.

l. Consistently writes in complete sentences with correct subject/verb agreement.

r. Uses appropriate capitalization and punctuation (periods, question and exclamation

marks) at the end of sentences (declarat
ive, interrogative, and exclamatory; simple

and compound).



Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
13


Student Materials


Cr a ne, C. ( 2002).

P i s f or pe ac h: a ge or gi a al phabet
. Che ls e a, MI: Sle e ping

Be a r Pr e s s.

ELMO


Georgia.

(2011). In

Compton's by Britannica.

Retrieved from


http://kids.britannica.com/comptons/article
-
201486/Georgia


Golle y, F. ( 2004).

Ne w ge or gi a e nc yc l ope di a
. Re t r ie ve d f r om

ht t p://www.ge or gia e nc yc lope dia.or g/nge/Ar t ic le.js p?id=h
-
2126


La doux, R. ( 2002).

Ge or gi a: he l l o u.s.a.
. Minnia pollis, MN: Fir s t

Edit ions.


Lear, K. (2011).
Expository Prewriting Checklist.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State

University, Valdosta, GA. (one for each student)


Lear, K. (2011).
Expository Prewriting

Rubric.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State

University, Valdosta, GA. (one for each student)


Lear, K. (2011).
Expository Writing Prewriting.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State

University, Valdosta, GA. (one for each student)


Lipkewic h, A., &
Mazurenko, R. (2001).

Abc's of t he wri t i ng process
.

Ret rieved from
ht t p://www.a nge l fi r e.co m/wi/wr i t i ngp roces s/

Overhead proj ect or

Pencils
-
one for each st udnet

SMART™Board


Teacher Materials


Cr a n
e, C. ( 2002).

P i s f or pe ac h: a ge or gi a al phabet
. Che ls e a, MI: Sle e ping

Be a r Pr e s s.


Golle y, F. ( 2004).

Ne w ge or gi a e nc yc l ope di a
. Re t r ie ve d f r om

ht t p://www.ge or gia e nc yc lope dia.or g/nge/Ar t ic le.js p?id=h
-
2126


Lear, K. (2011).
Expository Prewriting
Checklist.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State

University, Valdosta, GA.


Lear, K. (2011).
Expository Prewriting Rubric.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State

University, Valdosta, GA.


Lear, K. (2011).
Expository Writing Prewriting.
Unpublished manu
script. Valdosta State

University, Valdosta, GA.


Lipke wic h, A., & Ma zur e nko, R. ( 2001).

Abc's of t he wr i t i ng pr oc e s s
.

Re t r ie ve d f r om
ht t p://www.a nge lf ir e.c om/wi/wr it i ngpr oc e s s/

Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
14



Rojas, V.P. (2007).
Strategies for success with English language learners.

Alexandria, VA:
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.


The Faculty Room. (2004).
Learning disabilities.
Retrieved from
http://www.washington.edu/doit/Faculty/Strategies/Disability/LD/



Tompkins, G. (2012).
Teaching writing: balancing process and product
. Fresno, CA: Pearson.

Overhead proj ect or

SMART™Board



Instructional Procedures



Genre and Form

of
W
riting



The
genre

of writing we are going to talk about today is
expository

writing which is also
known as informational writing. “Expository writing is used to explain something, provide
instruction, or present information,”(Tompkins,
2012, p.202). Today
,

we will use expository
writing to present information about the Georgia Piedmont. Writers use this genre for a wide
variety of
works

including magazine articles, newspaper articles, directions, guidebooks;
students
usually

use this genre to write reports to share information they have learned, and essays
to describe som
ething,”
(Tompkins, 2012, p.202). While writing in this genre it is important to
focus on a single topic.


While we research information on our topic, we wil
l be using a specific type of books.
Can anyone tell me what types of books we will use? (
Nonfiction
). Good! Can anyone give me a
characteristic of nonfiction writing? (Some answers may include: factual, headings, lots of
information, half words and half i
llustrations). Great thinking! Can anyone give me an example
of a nonfiction book that we might be able to use to gather information for our reports? ( Some
answers may include: dictionary, encyclopedia, informational books about our topic, our social
stud
ies textbook).

The
form

of writing we are going to use to write our expository piece is
individual
reports
.
You will use a variety of nonfiction sources to gather information and then you will
summarize your findings and write a report to share with the c
lass. In your reports you will have
an opening or introduction paragraph, three body paragraphs and a closing paragraph. When I
think about a report the first thing I think of is a sandwich! The introduction paragraph is top
piece of bread. The opening or
introduction paragraph does just that, it introduces the material
that the report is going to be about. It is important to have a catchy first sentence to grab the
reader’s attention! The
three
body paragraphs are the peanut butter and jelly that fill the
sandwich up and make it juicy and delicious! The three middle or body paragraphs are the meat
of the report. Here you will describe three key details about your topic. The closing paragraph is
the bottom piece of bread that holds the sandwich together. The

closing paragraph is a summary
of the report.






Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
15


Stage of
W
riting


Before we can begin writing our reports on the Georgia Piedmont, we must first talk
about the
writing process
. Today
,

we are going to focus on the first stage of the writing process:
pre
writing
. In this stage we must choose a topic and then begin to gather ideas for our writing.
Since we just finished our unit on the Georgia Piedmont it is a good idea to write about that topic
because we are familiar with the content.


Before you begin to

write you must consider what your
purpose

is. Your purpose can be
to inform, entertain, or persuade. You always need a purpose before you begin to write. Today
,

our purpose is to inform by writing a report. Another important thing to think about before
wr
iting is who your
audience

is. The audience is to whom you are writing. Your audience could
be your friends, parents, neighbors, teacher, principal, brother or sister, anyone you can think of!
Today
,

your audience will be your teachers and peers.


The next

step in prewriting is to choose your
genre

and
form
. The genre and form you
choose will shape your writing. Today
,

your genre is expository or informational and your form
is an individual report.


When we begin thinking about our topic we can use a
graphi
c organizer

to organize our
ideas and thoughts. When you use a graphic organizer only use words or phrases because
sentences are not required at this step. We want to focus on getting our ideas down and organized
so that we can use our graphic organizer to

guide our writing during the second stage of the
writing process: drafting.


Modeling

A model of the expository report prewriting graphic organizer on the Blue Ridge
Mountains is displayed on the overhead projector. (I will go over the model with the stu
dents
showing them where I found information to complete my graphic organizer.) When you compose
your own expository report, you will complete a graphic organizer just like this to help you
generate ideas for your report.


On my graphic organizer, my topic

is clearly labeled as the Blue Ridge Mountains. My
audience is the class and my purpose is to write an informational report about the location and
aspects of the Blue Ridge Mountains. My genre is expository and my form is a report.

Next, on the top bun,
I have listed some background information that may come in handy
while I write my introductory paragraph. Remember, the introductory paragraph needs to catch
the reader’s interest! I have researched my topic and found three main ideas to write about. For
e
ach of these ideas, or the meat, I have found supporting details to include in my report. Finally,
on the bottom bun, I have generated ideas on what to put in my closing paragraph. Remember,
the closing paragraph sums up your report and revisits key inform
ation.


As you can see I did not use complete sentences in my graphic organizer. I used words
and phrases to get my ideas down on paper. I used good handwriting so that I can read what I
wrote when I go back to write my story.


Practice Activity


I will us
e
interactive writing

to complete a blank graphic organizer on the SMART™Board
with the students. This practice activity will be based on the coastal plains. Students will provide
information and details to complete the graphic organizer by referring to so
urces such as their
social studies book or books located in the classroom library.

Assessment Activity


Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
16


Today
,

we have practiced using a graphic organizer to guide our thinking in the
prewriting stage of the writing process. You are now going to plan an expository report about the
Georgia Piedmont. On your graphic organizer, fill in the sections on your sandwich f
or
introduction paragraph, body paragraph 1, body paragraph 2, body paragraph 3 and closing
paragraph just as we did in class. Remember, you also need to list the audience and purpose at
the top of your graphic organizer. There are books available in the c
lassroom library for you to
use to guide your thinking. Also you may use your social studies book and the websites I have
listed on the board.


I am also giving you a checklist to use to make sure you have included all the elements
we have talked about in
class. Finally, I am giving you the rubric from which your graphic
organizer will be graded. Use these two papers to guide your writing on your graphic organizer.


Once again, remember not to use complete sentences in your graphic organizer!


Modification
s and/or Accommodations of Instructional Methods



1.

Accommodations and/or Modifications for Needs of Students with

Differing
Development
al Levels
:

I have one student who has a specific learning disability. While completing the graphic
organizer, the studen
t will be allowed to dictate his responses to a peer or teacher as an
alternative to writing his own responses. The student will also be given additional time to
complete the graphic organizer.

Teacher will provide lower level books for students to
researc
h from.


If I provide these accommodations, the student will be more successful at writing and
getting his ideas down on paper. The additional time with relieve some of the stress that
goes along with lengthy writing assignments. According to The Faculty
Room (
2004), “
a
student with a learning disability, auditory, visual, or tactile information can become
jumbled at any point during transmission, receipt, processing, and/or re
-
transmission. For
example, it may take longer for some students who have learni
ng disabilities to process
written information. Lengthy reading or writing assignments and tests may therefore, be
difficult to complete in a standard amount of time.”

Providing extra time for this student
will allow him to process the written information

at his own pace.



2.

Accommodations and/or Modifications for Needs of Students from

Differing Cultural
and

Linguistic Backgrounds
:

I have two students that are English Language Learners. Both of their native languages
are Spanish. Since both students spea
k Spanish I will pair these two students up to be
linguistic buddies while they work on their graphic organizer. If they need further
assistance, I will ask my bilingual student who is fluent in both English and Spanish to
help them decode words into Engli
sh.


If I provide these accommodations, the students will be more open to the writing activity.
According to Rojas (2007), … “the use of this strategy will help students to engage in a
variety of writing activities.”


Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
17





Expository Writing Prewriting



Name:__________________
____________
































Introduction:

“top slice of bread”
-


What is a catchy way to start your report?



What is the topic of your report?




Body:

“peanut butter and jelly”


1
st

Paragraph Topic:___________________________________________


Detail 1:




Detail 2:




Detail 3:



2
nd

Paragraph Topic:_
__________________________________________________


Detail 1:




Detail 2:




Detail 3:



Audience
:

Who is your audience?



Purpose:

What is your purpose for writing this report?



Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
18











































kjhgvfhnjn

3rd Paragraph Topic:_
__________________________________________________


Detail 1:




Detail 2:




Detail 3:




Conclusion:

“bottom slice of bread”

How can you finish your report?





Topic #1:_______________________________________________________


Topic#2:_______________________________________________________


Topic #3:_______________________________________________________

Lear, K. (2011).
Expository Writing Prewriting.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State

University,

Valdosta, GA.


Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
19


Expository Prewriting Checklist:

Name:_________________________________ Date:___________________


Introduction:

______ Did I state my topic?

______ Did I create a hook?

______ Did I identify my audience and purpose?

Body:

_____ Did I pick a first
sub
topic?


_____ Did I identify three details about this topic?

_____ Did I pick a second
sub
topic?


_____ Did I identify three details about this topic?

_____ Did I pick a third
sub
topic?



_____ Did I identify three details about this topic?

Conclusion:

____ Did I restate my three topics?

Lear, K. (2011).
Expository Prewriting Checklist.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University,

Valdosta, GA.


Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
20



Expository Prewriting
Rubric:

Student Name:___________________________________


Meets Standard

(3)

Partially Meets
Standard

(2)

Does Not Meet
Standard

(1)

Audience and
Purpose

Clearly identifies
audience and
purpose

Identifies either
audience or purpose

Did not attempt

Introd
uction

Identifies topic and
creates a hook.

Identifies topic or
creates a hook.

Did not attempt

Body: Paragraph
Subt
opic
1
/supporting
details

2
-
3

1

0

Body: Paragraph
Subt
opic
2
/supporting
details

2
-
3

1

0

Body: Paragraph
Subt
opic
3/supporting
details

2
-
3

1

0

Conclusion:

Identifies possible
ideas for conclusion
including two or
three topics from
report.

Identifies possible
ideas for conclusion
including one topic
from report.

Did not attempt

Total Points:

________/54

______X 3

______X 2

_______X 1


Lear, K. (2011).
Expository Prewriting Rubric.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University,

Valdosta, GA.


Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
21





Expository Writing Prewriting



Name:___
MODEL
_______________
____________






























Body:

“peanut butter and jelly”


1
st

Paragraph Topic:_____
location/wild life
______________________


Detail 1:


north Georgia/

Daw
son County



Detail 2:



part of the Appalachian Mountains



Detail 3:


animals
-

squirrels, r
abbits,
deer, skunks and r
accoons


alants
-

tall oak trees and p
ine forests


2
nd

Paragraph Topic:_____
Blood Mountain
________________________


Detail 1:


highest

point in Georgia



Detail 2:


Creek Indians/ Cherokee Indians


Detail 3:


war that took place here


Audience
:

Who is your audience?


classmates
, teacher



Purpose:

What is your purpose for writing this report?

write about the Blue Ridge Mountains and where they are located


Introduction:

“top slice of bread”
-


What is a catchy way to start your report?

asking

the audience a question


What is the topic of your report?

the Blue Ridge Mountains





Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
22












































3rd Paragraph Topic:____
Georgia

Gold Belt
______________________________


Detail 1:


Dahlonega, Georgia



Detail 2:


1829



Detail 3:


i
ndians kicked off land


Conclusion:

“bottom slice of bread”

How can you finish your report?



Summarize important information



Conservation information


Topic #1:___________

location/wild life

_________________________


Topic#2:_____________

Blood Mountain

_______________________


Topic #3:________________
Georgia Gold Belt
________________________

Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
23



Lesson Plan for the Interdisciplinary Writing Unit, READ 7140


Name
: Kayla Lear



Grade
L
evel
: 2
nd



Stage of
W
riting
: Drafting


Genre

and Form
of
W
riting
:
Informational
-

Individual Reports


Content area
: Social Studies


Topic and/or
C
oncept
:

Before beginning this writing unit,
the students will have studied t
he Blue Ridge Mountains,
Georgia Piedmont and Georgia Coastal Plain in depth in Social Studies class. Students will have
accessed informational websites about these topics and will also ha
ve looked through books in
the classroom library about these topics.

Content Area GPS
:

SS2G1 The student will locate major topographical features of Georgia and will

describe how these features define Georgia’s surface.

a. Locate all the geographic regions of Georgia: Blue Ridge Mountains, Piedmont,

Coastal Plain,
Valley and Ridge, and Appalachian Plateau
.


English Language Arts GPS
:

ELA2W2

The student writes in a variety of genres, including
narrative
,

informational,
persuasive, and response to literature
.

The student produces informational writing that:

b. Begins to sustain a focused topic.

c. Includes the appropriate purpose,
expectations, and length

for the audience and genre.

d. Adds facts and details.

g. Uses a va
riety of resources (encyclopedia, Internet, books) to research and share

information on a topic.

i. May include pre
-
writing.

j. May include a draft

that is revised and edited.

k. May be published.


ELA2W1

The student begins to demonstrate competency in th
e writing process. The

student

a. Writes text of a length appropriate to address a topic

and tell the story.

h. Pre
-
writes to generate ideas orally.

i. Uses planning ideas to produce a rough draft.

k. Creates documents with legible handwriting.

l.
Consistently writes in complete sentences with correct subject/verb agreement.

r. Uses appropriate capitalization and punctuation (periods, question and exclamation

marks) at the end of sentences (declarative, interrogative, and exclamatory; simple

Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
24


and c
ompound).

Student Materials

Bergey, M. (2009).

Wri t i ng f or k i ds
. Ret rieved from
ht t p://wri t i ng
-
for
-

kids.com/



Cr a ne, C. ( 2002).

P i s f or pe ac h: a ge or gi a al phabet
. Che ls e a, MI: Sle e ping

Be a r Pr e s s.

ELMO


Georgia.

(2011). In

Compton's by Britannica.

Retrieved from

http://kids.britannica.com/comptons/article
-
201486/Georgia


Golle y, F. ( 2004).

Ne w ge or gi a e nc yc l ope di a
. Re t r ie ve d f r om

ht t p://w
ww.ge or gia e nc yc lope dia.or g/nge/Ar t ic le.js p?id=h
-
2126


La doux, R. ( 2002).

Ge or gi a: he l l o u.s.a.
. Minne a polis, MN: Fir s t

Edit ions.


Lear, K. (2011).
Expository Drafting Checklist.

Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State

University, Valdosta, GA. (one for
each student)


Lear, K. (2011).
Expository Drafting Rubric.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State

University, Valdosta, GA. (one for each student)


Lipkewic h, A., & Mazurenko, R. (2001).

Abc's of t he wri t i ng process
.

Ret rieved from
ht t p://www.a nge l fi r e.co m/wi/wr i t i ngp roces s/

Overhead proj ect or

Pencils
-
one for each st udent

SMART™Board


Teacher Materials


Cr a ne, C. ( 2002).

P i s f or pe ac h: a ge or gi a al phabet
. Che ls e a, MI: Sle e ping

Be a r Pr e s s.


Golle y, F. ( 2004).

Ne w ge or gi a e nc yc l ope di a
. Re t r ie ve d f r om

ht t p://www.ge or gia e nc yc lope dia.or g/nge/Ar t ic le.js p?id=h
-
2126


Lear, K. (2011).
Expository Drafting Checklist.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State

University, Valdosta, GA.


Lear, K. (2011).
E
xpository Drafting Rubric.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State

University, Valdosta, GA.


Lipke wic h, A., & Ma zur e nko, R. ( 2001).

Abc's of t he wr i t i ng pr oc e s s
.

Re t r ie ve d f r om
ht t p://www.a nge lf
ir e.c om/wi/wr it i ngpr oc e s s/


Rojas, V.P. (2007).
Strategies for success with English language learners.

Alexandria, VA:
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
25



The Faculty Room. (2004).
Learning disabilities.
Retrieved from
http://www.washington.edu/doit/Faculty/Strategies/Disability/LD/



Tompkins, G. (2012).
Teaching writing: balancing process and product
. Fresno, CA: Pearson.

Overhead proj ect or

SMART™Board


Instructional Procedures



Genre and Form

of
W
riting



The
genre

of writing we are going to talk about today is
expository

writing which is also
known as informational writing. “Expository writing is used to explain something, provide
instruct
ion, or present information,”(Tompkins, 2012, p.202). Today, we will use expository
writing to present information about the Georgia Piedmont. Writers use this genre for a wide
variety of works including magazine articles, newspaper articles, directions,
guidebooks;
students usually use this genre to write reports to share information they have learned, and essays
to describe something,” (Tompkins, 2012, p.202). While writing in this genre it is important to
focus on a single topic.


While we research info
rmation on our topic, we will be using a specific type of books.
Can anyone tell me what types of books we will use? (
Nonfiction
). Good! Can anyone give me a
characteristic of nonfiction writing? (Some answers may include: factual, headings, lots of
inform
ation, half words and half illustrations). Great thinking! Can anyone give me an example
of a nonfiction book that we might be able to use to gather information for our reports? ( Some
answers may include: dictionary, encyclopedia, informational books abou
t our topic, our social
studies textbook).

The
form

of writing we are going to use to write our expository piece is
individual
reports
.
You will use a variety of nonfiction sources to gather information and then you will
summarize your findings and write
a report to share with the class. In your reports you will have
an opening or introduction paragraph, three body paragraphs and a closing paragraph. When I
think about a report the first thing I think of is a sandwich! The introduction paragraph is top
pie
ce of bread. The opening or introduction paragraph does just that, it introduces the material
that the report is going to be about. It is important to have a catchy first sentence to grab the
reader’s attention! The three body paragraphs are the peanut but
ter and jelly that fill the
sandwich up and make it juicy and delicious! The three middle or body paragraphs are the meat
of the report. Here you will describe three key details about your topic. The closing paragraph is
the bottom piece of bread that hold
s the sandwich together. The closing paragraph is a summary
of the report.



Stage of
W
riting



The second stage of the writing process is
drafting
. In this stage
,

we take the information
we put in our graphic organizer and create complete sentences to mak
e our reports. “Writers
focus on getting their ideas down on paper during drafting. They begin with
uncertain

ideas
developed and organized through prewriting activities and elaborate on them as they work. The
drafting stage is the time to pour out ideas”
, (Tompkins, 2012, p.8). Since we did our prewriting
Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
26


graphic organizer on the Georgia Piedmont, we will write a draft of our report draft on the same
topic.


When writing our draft, we need to focus on getting our ideas down on paper without
worrying about

spelling and grammar. Later on in the writing process
,

we will make corrections
to grammar and spelling. We must also skip lines while write to leave room to make these
corrections later in the writing process.


The first thing we need to remember when wr
iting our draft is to use the information
from our graphic organizers
. The graphic organizer is there to help guide your writing but if you
have a new idea that is not on your graphic organizer it is okay to use it! “Be selective in the
ideas that you incl
ude. You don’t have to include
everything

that was in your prewriting! Pick
your best ideas. Make sure they relate to each other and your topic”,

(Lipkewic h &
Mazurenko, 2001).


Next, we need to create a catchy introductory sentence that will grab the rea
der’s
attention and make them want to continue reading. After we have our catchy first sentence
,

we
must focus on creating
our introductory paragraph. This paragraph should include the topic of
the report and an overview of the material. Next, we must focu
s on the three body paragraphs. As
we talked about before, these are the “meat” of the sandwich. This is where our three subtopics
are introduced and expanded on. Finally, we will focus on the conclusion to our draft. This is the
part of the paper where we

summarize what has been said and leave the reader wanting to know
more about our subject.


Modeling



A model of the expository report prewriting graphic organizer on the Blue Ridge
Mountains is displayed on the overhead projector. “Now that we understand

the steps that are
involved in creating a draft, I will show you a model of a report draft on the Blue Ridge
Mountains.”



The teacher will put a copy of her model on the SMART™Board and walk students
through the different elements included in the draft. The teacher will show how she used her
graphic organizer to create the draft.



“My first paragraph is an overview of what
my report is about. The second paragraph is
about the location and wildlife found in the Blue Ridge Mountains. The third paragraph is
about Blood Mountain and the battle that gave the mountain its name. The fourth paragraph
is about the Georgia Gold Belt t
hat is found in the Blue Ridge Mountains. The fifth and final
paragraph summarizes the report. Can you see how my prewriting graphic organizer laid out
the format for my report?”



The teacher will make sure to point out any misspellings to show students
that their draft
does not need to be perfect. The teacher will also reinforce that the author skipped lines in the
model. The teacher will also point out that the author writes the word “draft” on the paper to
show that this is not the final product.


Prac
tice Activity


The model of the draft in the Blue Ridge Mountains is displayed on the over head
projector as an example. I will use
interactive writing

to complete a blank graphic organizer on
the SMART™Board with the students. This practice activity will
be based on the coastal plains.
Students will provide information and details to the draft by referring to the graphic organizer
Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
27


created in the prewriting stage lesson and sources such as their social studies book or books
located in the classroom library.



Assessment Activity



Today
,

we have practiced using a graphic organizer to guide and create a draft in the
second stage of the writing process. You are now going to draft a
n

expository report about the
Georgia Piedmont. While creating your draft, use the graphic organizer you created in the
prewriting stage to guide your writing. There are books available in the classroom library for you
to use to guide your thinking. Also
,

y
ou may use your social studies book and the websites I have
listed on the board.


I am also giving you a checklist to use to make sure you have included all the elements
we have talked about in class. Finally, I am giving you the rubric from which your dra
ft will be
graded. Use these two papers to guide your writing on your draft.



Once again, remember to skip lines and not worry about spelling while writing your
draft!

Modifications and/or Accommodations of Instructional Methods


1.

Accommodations and/or Mo
difications for Needs of Students with

Differing
Development
al Levels
:

I have one student who has a specific learning disability. Before this student begins
writing his draft, I will provide him with typed directions for the assignment as well as
typed di
rections about expository writing.


If I provide these accommodations, the student will be more successful at writing and
getting his ideas down on paper. The typed directions will help the student successfully
write his draft. According to The Faculty Roo
m (2004), “
People with learning disabilities
may have difficulty spelling and subsequently have difficulty creating or editing text or
otherwise communicating in writing. Examples of accommodations for students who
have learning disabilities include:

Provi
ding projects or detailed instructions on
audiotapes or print copies.”


2.

Accommodations and/or Modifications for Needs of Students from

Differing Cultural
and

Linguistic Backgrounds
:

I have two students that are English Language Learners. Both of their nat
ive languages
are Spanish. Since both students speak Spanish I will
allow

each student to use

some
Spanish words as they write

while they write. If they need further assistance, I will ask
my bilingual student who is fluent in both English and Spanish to h
elp them decode
words into English.


If I provide these accommodations, the students will be more open to the writing activity.
According to
Tompkins (2012), “English language learners’ limited vocabulary makes it
much harder for them to express their
ideas in writing. Sometimes they can express an
idea using conversational English, but they do not know the more sophisticated academic
language they need for writing. Even though teachers introduce vocabulary and have
word walls, English language learners

often don’t practice these words enough to be able
to use them in the sentences they are writing.




Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
28


Expo
sitory Drafting Checklist


Name:______________________________



Introduction:

______ Did I state my topic?

______ Did I create a hook?

______ Did I
remember

my audience and purpose?

______ Did I stay focused on my topic throughout the draft?

Body paragraphs:

_____
Does my first body paragraph have a main

sub
-
topic?



_____ Did I include

at least
three
details about this
topic?

_____
Does

my second body paragraph have a main

sub
-
topic?



_____ Did I include

at least
three details about this topic?

_____
Does my third body paragraph have a main

sub
-
topic?



_____ Did I include

at least
three details about this to
pic?

Conclusion:

_____ Does my conclusion restate the topic and subtopics?


Lear, K. (2011).
Expository Drafting Checklist.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University,

Valdosta, GA.


Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
29



Expository Drafting Rubric


Student name:_
_____________________________________



Meets Standard

(3)

Partially Meets
Standard

(2)

Does Not Meet
Standard

(1)

Focus

Stays on topic
throughout report.

Student stays on
topic for most of the
report with a little
variation.

Student does not
stay on topi
c during
report.

Introduction

Identifies topic and
creates a hook.

Identifies topic or
creates a hook.

Did not attempt

Body: Paragraph
Subt
opic 1

Supporting Details

2
-
3

1

0

Body: Paragraph
Subt
opic 2

Supporting Details

2
-
3

1

0

Body: Paragraph
Subt
opic
3:

Supporting Details

2
-
3

1

0

Conclusion:

Readdresses topic
and 3 subtopics

Readdresses topic
and 1
-
2 subtopics

Did not attempt

Total Points:

________/54

______X 3

______X 2

_______X 1




Model
Draft

Lear, K. (2011).
Expository Drafting Rubric.
Unpublished
manuscript. Valdosta State University,

Valdosta, GA.


Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
30


Model Draft

Have you ever wanted to travel to a place that at one point




X















had gold, Indians and very high mountian peaks? If you have then


X














Georgia’s Blue Ridge Mountains the place for you Over the



X














years these mountains have beenn the back drop for a lot of



X














American history. If these mountains could talk then they would



X















have

quite the tail to tell.









X














The Blue Ridge Mountains are itn northeast georgia. They part


X














of the Appalachian Mountains. They account for 75 mile of the


X














Appalachian trail. In Georgia, the blueridge m
ountains are mostly


X















made ofmetamorphic rock. and limestone. Many of animals



X















live there. Skunk, rakoon, deer an d rabbits live there Many types



X














of squirrels live there. In the winter they all covered in s
now. In


X















the Blue Ridge Mountains there are tall oak trees and Pine tree


X















forests. Besides the oak and pine trees, there is also grass, shrubs



X

and hemlock growing there. At 4,461 feet, one of the highest points


X















in georgia is one Blood Mountain. It is called that because two



X














Indian tribes, The Creek Indians and The Cherokee Indians, had a



Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
31



X














war there. The Cherokee Indians considered Blood Mountain a holy

X















pl
ace. The Creek Indians lost the war and the Cherokee Indians


X















won Blood Mountain and the resources on on

it. It is said to be


X














named blood mountain because off all the Indians who died in this

X














war.

The georgia

gold belt is in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Before


X















people went to look for gold in california they went to the Blue


X















Ridge Mountains to pan for gold In
1829 word of the gold got out



X














and people rushed to the
Dahlonega area to find the gold.

Gold


X














miners found a surplus of gold there which led to the Indians



X















getting kicked out off their land.








X














The Blue Ridge Mountains account for a lot of Georgia’s





X














history. From Indians and war to gold to high peaks and ample



X














wildlife these mountains drew many people to them because of their

X














rich resources. In order to preserve this area, the Blue Ridge



X














Mountains located in Georgia are now protected by law.




X
















Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
32


Lesson Plan for the Interdisciplinary Writing Unit, READ 7140


Name
: Kayla Lear



Grade
L
evel
: 2
nd



Stage of
W
riting
: Revising


Genre

and Form
of
W
riting
:
Informational
-

Individu
al Reports


Content area
: Social Studies


Topic and/or
C
oncept
:

Before beginning this writing unit,
the students will have studied t
he Blue Ridge Mountains,
Georgia Piedmont and Georgia Coastal Plain in depth in Social Studies class. Students will have
ac
cessed informational websites about these topics and will also have looked through books in
the classroom library about these topics.

Content Area GPS
:

SS2G1 The student will locate major topographical features of Georgia and will

describe

how these features define Georgia’s surface.

a. Locate all the geographic regions of Georgia: Blue Ridge Mountains, Piedmont,

Coastal Plain,
Valley and Ridge, and Appalachian Plateau
.


English Language Arts GPS
:

ELA2W2

The student writes in a variety of genres, including
narrative
,

informational,
persuasive, and response to literature
.

The student produces informational writing that:

b. Begins to sustain a focused topic.

c. Includes the appropriate purpose, expectation
s, and length for the audience and genre.

d. Adds facts and details.

g. Uses a variety of resources (encyclopedia, Internet, books) to research and share

information on a topic
.

i. May include pre
-
writing.

j. May include a draft

that is revised

and edited
.

k. May be published.


ELA2W1

The student begins to demonstrate competency in the writing process. The

student

a.
Writes text of a length appropriate to address a topic

and tell the story.

h. Pre
-
writes to generate ideas orally.

i. Uses planning ideas to

produce a rough draft.

k. Creates documents with legible handwriting.

l. Consistently writes in complete sentences with correct subject/verb agreement.

r. Uses appropriate capitalization and punctuation (periods, question and exclamation

marks) at the
end of sentences (
declarative, interrogative, and exclamatory; simple

and compound).

Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
33


Student Materials

Bergey, M. (2009).

Wri t i ng f or k i ds
. Ret rieved from
ht t p://wri t i ng
-
for
-

kids.com/


ELMO

Lear, K. (2011).
Expository

Revision Checklist.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State

University, Valdosta, GA.


Lear, K. (2011).
Revising Marks.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University, Valdosta,

GA.

Lear,K. (2011).
Expository Revising Rubric.
Retrieved from Dr. Root’s

Web site
http://coefaculty.valdosta.edu/troot/read7140/Writing_Assessments.htm.

Lipkewic h, A., & Mazurenko, R. (2001).

Abc's of t he wri t i ng process
.

Ret rieved from
ht t p://www.a nge l fi r e.co m/wi/w
r i t i ngp roces s/

Overhead proj ect or

Blue Pens
-
one for each st udent

SMART™Board

Students drafts on the Georgia Piedmont

Teacher Materials

Lear, K. (2011).
Revising Marks.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University, Valdosta,

GA.

Lear, K. (2011).
Expos
itory Revision Checklist.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State

University, Valdosta, GA.

Lear,K. (2011).
Expository Revising Rubric.
Retrieved from Dr. Root’s Web site
http://coefaculty.valdosta.edu/troot/read7140/Writing_Assessments.htm
.

Lipke wic h, A.,

& Ma zur e nko, R. ( 2001).

Abc's of t he wr i t i ng pr oc e s s
.

Re t r ie ve d f r om
ht t p://www.a nge lf ir e.c om/wi/wr it i ngpr oc e s s/

Rojas, V.P. (2007).
Strategies for success with English language learners.

Alexandria, VA:
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

The Faculty Room. (2004).
Learning disabilities.
Retrieved from
http://www.washington.edu/doit/Facult
y/Strategies/Disability/LD/


Tompkins, G. (2012).
Teaching writing: balancing process and product
. Fresno, CA: Pearson.

Overhead proj ect or

SMART™Board


Instructional Procedures



Genre and Form

of
W
riting



The
genre

of writing we are going to talk about t
oday is
expository

writing which is also
known as informational writing. “Expository writing is used to explain something, provide
instruction, or present information,”
(Tompkins, 2012, p.202). Today,
we will use expository
writing to present information a
bout the Georgia Piedmont. Writers use this genre for a wide
variety of compositions including magazine articles, newspaper articles, directions, guidebooks;
students typically use this genre to write reports to share information they have learned, and
ess
ays to describe something, compare two things, explain a change using cause and effects or
specify how to make or do something,” (Tompkins, 2012, p.202). While writing in this genre it is
important to focus on a single topic.

Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
34



While we research information on our topic, we will be using a specific type of books.
Can anyone tell me what types of books we will use? (
Nonfiction
).

Good! Can anyone give me a
characteristic of nonfiction writing? (Some answers may include: factual, headings, lots of
information, half words and half illustrations). Great thinking! Can anyone give me an example
of a nonfiction book that we might be abl
e to use to gather information for our reports? ( Some
answers may include: dictionary, encyclopedia, informational books about our topic, our social
studies textbook). (Tompkins, 2012, p.206).

The
form

of writing we are going to use to write our exposito
ry piece is
individual
reports
.
You will use a variety of nonfiction sources to gather information and then you will
summarize your findings and write an report to share with the class. In your reports you will
have an opening or introduction paragraph, th
ree body paragraphs and a closing paragraph.
When I think about a report the first thing I think of is a sandwich! The introduction paragraph is
top piece of bread. The opening or introduction paragraph does just that, it introduces the
material that the r
eport is going to be about. It is important to have a catchy first sentence to grab
the reader’s attention! The body paragraphs are the peanut butter and jelly that fill the sandwich
up and make it juicy and delicious! The three middle or body paragraphs a
re the meat of the
report. Here you will describe three key details about your topic. The closing paragraph is the
bottom piece of bread that holds the sandwich together. The closing paragraph is a summary of
the report.




Stage of
W
riting



The third sta
ge of the writing process is
revis
ing
. In this stage
,

we look at our drafts and
add, delete, change and rearrange. We add words, sentences and quotations that we may have
forgotten in the draft. We delete unnecessary words or sentences. We change what we w
rote if
we can think of a better more efficient way to say it. We rearrange sentences to make our draft
sound and flow the best it can. “Writers clarify and refine ideas in their drafts during revising,”
(Tompkins,2012, p.9).


While revising there are a f
ew revising marks you will need to know.



To add information you use the caret (^) symbol.



To delete information you cross through it.
(word)











correction



To change information you write the correction above the deletion line.
(word)



To rearra
nging you use arrows to show where you want the information moved to
in your draft.


During this stage it is important to remember what we are looking for in our drafts! We
do NOT need to correct grammar or spelling at this stage in the writing process. W
e will do that
in the next stage. Also, it is important to use a different color pen while revising then the color
you used while you wrote your draft.



Modeling



A model of the revised expository report draft on the Blue Ridge Mountains is displayed
on
the overhead projector. “Now that we understand the steps that are involved in revising
draft, I will show you a model of a report draft on the Blue Ridge Mountains that has been
revised.”

Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
35




The teacher will put a copy of her model on the SMART™Board and w
alk students
through the different elements included in the revising stage. The teacher will make sure to
point out any misspellings to show students this is not the stage in which we correct spelling.
The teacher will also point out that the author writes

the word “revising” on the paper to
show that this is not the final product.


Practice Activity



The model of the revised draft in the Blue Ridge Mountains is displayed on the over head
projector as an example. I will use
interactive writing

to revise the classes draft on the
SMART™Board with the students. This practice activity will be based on the coastal plains.
Students will provide input while we revise the draft and will use correct drafting marks while
writing on the draft.


Assessment Activity



Today
,

we have practiced using revising marks to revise our reports in the third stage of
the writing process. You are now

going to

revise your own expository report about the Georgia
Piedmont. While revising your draft, remember to o
nly focus on adding, deleting, reordering and
changing words or sentences.


I am giving you a worksheet with examples of revision marks to help guide your
revisions. I am also giving you a checklist to help you complete this stage. Finally, I am giving
you

the rubric from which your revised draft will be graded. Use these two papers to guide your
revisions.



Once again, remember do not make corrections to spelling and grammar!


Modifications and/or Accommodations of Instructional Methods



3.

Accommodations a
nd/or Modifications for Needs of Students with

Differing
Development
al Levels
:

I have one student who has a specific learning disability. Before this student begins
revising his draft
, I will provide him with typed directions for the assignment as well as

typed directions about expository writing.


If I provide these accommodations, the student will be more successful at writing and
getting his ideas down on paper. The typed directions will help the student successfully
write his draft. According to The Fa
culty Room (2004), “
People with learning disabilities
may have difficulty spelling and subsequently have difficulty creating or editing text or
otherwise communicating in writing. Examples of accommodations for students who
have learning disabilities inclu
de:

Providing projects or detailed instructions on
audiotapes or print copies.”



4.

Accommodations and/or Modifications for Needs of Students from

Differing Cultural
and

Linguistic Backgrounds
:

I have two students that are English Language Learners. Both of

their native languages
are Spanish. For the revising stage of the writing process I will use the “two column
count” method with the students so that they will recognize sentences structure, sentence
variation and run on sentences.

Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
36



If I provide these acco
mmodations, the students will be more successful
in revising their
drafts. According to Rosas (2007), “Students do an exercise in which they list the first
word of every sentence and then count the number of words in those sentences. By
writing the result
s on a page with two columns
-
one column for first words and one with
the word totals
-
they will see that some sentence variety is needed( or that some sentences
are probability so long that they are run
-
on).”








































Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
37



Expository Revising

Checklist


Name:______________________________



____ Did I
add information to draft to make it flow together



better?


____ Did I
delete any unnecessary information from my




draft?


____
Did I rearrange information in my draft to make my




draft flow better?

____ Did I change information in my draft to make the draft




better?

____ Did I use the correct revision marks?







Lear, K. (2011).
Expository Revision Checklist.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University,

Valdosta, GA.


Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
38



Revision Marks
:


Additions:

Example: Revision:


delicious

I make cookies. I make
^

cookies.


Deletions:



Example:


Revision:

I love the mom. I love
the

mom.


Reordering:

Example:

Revision:

Fast the cat ran. Fast the cat ran.




Changing:

Exa
mple:
Revision:


love

I like my dog. I
like

my dog.







Lear, K. (2011).
Revising Marks.
Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA.


Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
39


Expository Revising Rubric Name_______________



Exceeds
Standard

3

Meets

Standard

2

Somewhat

Meets
Standard

1

Does not Meet

Standard

0

Teacher

Score

Adding

*6 or more
additions were
made

*Additions
varied (words,
sentences, etc.)

5
-
8
additions
were made

3
-
5 additions
were made

2 or less
additions were
made


Deleting

All unnecessary
information or
words were
deleted

Most
unnecessary
information or
words were
deleted

Some
unnecessary
information or
words were
deleted

There is
information (or
words) that
needs to be
deleted, yet no
deletions were
made


Rearranging

All
rearrangements
were made as
necessary

Most

rearrangements
made to clarify
writing

Some
rearrangements
were made to
clarify writing

There were no
rearrangements
that were
needed were
not made


Color of
revision
marks


All revisions
are made using
a different
colored pen

Most revisions
are made using
a different
colored pen

Revisions are
made with same
color pen/pencil
in which draft
was written


Proofreading
Mar
ks

All
proofreading
marks are used
correctly

Most
proofreading
marks are used
correctly

Some
proofreading
marks are used
correctly

No
proofreading
marks have
been used or all
have been used
incorrectly










Lear,K. (2011).
Expository Revising Rubric.
Retrieved from Dr. Root’s Web site
http://coefaculty.valdosta.edu/troot/read7140/Writing_Assessments.htm.


Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
40






Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
41







Lear, Kayla, READ 7140,
42


Lesson Plan for the Interdisciplinary Writing Unit, READ 7140


Name
: Kayla Lear



Grade
L
evel
: 2
nd



Stage of
W
riting
: Editing


Genre

and Form
of
W
riting
:
Informational
-

Individual Reports


Content area
: Social Studies


Topic and/or
C
oncept
:

Before beginning this writing unit, the students will have studied The Blue Ridge Mountains,
Georgia Piedmont and Georgia Coastal Plain in de
pth in Social Studies class. Students will have
accessed informational websites about these topics and will also have looked through books in
the classroom library about these topics.

Content Area GPS
:

SS2G1 The student will locate major topographical fea
tures of Georgia and will

describe how these features define Georgia’s surface.

a. Locate all the geographic regions of Georgia: Blue Ridge Mountains, Piedmont,

Coastal Plain,
Valley and Ridge, and Appalachian Plateau
.


English Language Arts GPS
:

ELA2W2

The student writes in a variety of genres, including
narrative
,

informational,
persuasive, and response to literature
.

The student produces informational writing that:

b. Begins to sustain a focused topic.

c. Includes the appropriate purpose, expec
tations, and length for the audience and genre.

d. Adds facts and details.

g. Uses a variety of resources (encyclopedia, Internet, books) to research and share

information on a topic
.

i. May include pre
-
writing.

j. May include a draft

that is
revised

and
edited.

k. May be published.


ELA2W1

The student begins to demonstrate competency in the writing process. The

student

a.
Writes text of a length appropriate to address a topic

and tell the story.

h. Pre
-
writes to generate ideas orally.

i. Uses planning id
eas to produce a rough draft.

k. Creates documents with legible handwriting.

l. Consistently writes in complete sentences with correct subject/verb agreement.