ly manner

• Demonstrates understanding of ethical issues related to own professional certification area

Candidates

read and sign the Kentucky Code of Ethics in their cohort groups. They read passages from
The Ethics of
Teaching

(
Stri
ke & Soltis, 2004, 4
th

Ed., Teachers College Press)
and engage in classroom discussions. In the science
methods courses,
candidate
s learn of the additional responsibilities associated with laboratory safety. During student
teaching, cooperating teachers and supervisors discus
s possible safety problems associated with the laboratory experiences.
Observation reports document
candidates
’ compliance or needs for improvement in science laboratory safety.



22

Unit
Technology Standards


Technology Standard 1: Candidates integrate med
ia and technology into instruction.


Candidates pursing certification in
science education develop lesson plans involving the use of technology and media into
the instruction of the single topic unit. In the course,
candidate
s use probes connected to comp
uters, graphical software,
web questions, spreadsheets, e
-
mail
,

and PowerPoint presentations to collect data and disseminate their findings. Methods
Candidates in methods courses

experience using many different forms of media in the science classroom incl
uding, but not
limited to compasses, rulers, protractors, sand kits, laboratory glassware, saf
ety devises and butterfly nets.
From these
classroom experiences,
candidates

integrate these uses and others into unit plans intended for use during student teac
hing.


Technology Standard 2: Candidates utilize multiple technology applications to support student learning.


Science education majors usually have pr
evious experiences using probes

and graphing software from the physics
laboratories. In the methods

course
, candidates

expand their experiences with technology and discuss how using multiple
applications of technology supports the learning of a diverse student population. During the science methods course,
instructors encourage including technology in
the unit lessons plans. During student teaching, the supervisor must observe
the student teacher using technology with the class. The program prefers to observe the student teacher facilitating student

use of technology.


Technology Standard 3: Candidat
es select appropriate technology to enhance instruction.


In the methods course,
candidates

develop a unit plan for a specific topic in science. Within this plan, instructors
encouraged the inclusion of technology. During student teaching, the student t
eacher’s supervisor conferences with
him/her after the technology lesson about the selected technology application. The supervisor raises questions about the
candidate
’s selection of technology and how the use of technology improved or hindered the lesson
. On the observation
form, filled out online, the lesson evaluation includes the use of technology in the classroom.


Technology Standard 4: Candidates integrate student use of technology into instruction.


Student teachers are observed by their supervis
or and their cooperating teacher. The supervisor encourages the use of
technology with the students
,

and the cooperating teacher supports the
candidate
’s use of technology with high school
students. At the end of a formal observation, the student teacher
’s use of technology in instruction is evaluated within the
context of the lesson. At the conclusion of the student teaching semester, an overall evaluation
of
student teacher’s
technology use with high school students is determined from the recommendatio
ns of the cooperating teacher and the
supervisor as well as the written observation forms submitted over the semester.


Technology Standard 5: Candidates address special learning needs through technology.


On lesson plans,
candidates

comment how the techn
ology addresses a special learning need. This special learning need
includes clarification of a relationship between t
wo
variables or accommodation of an individual education plan in the
classroom.


Technology Standard 6: Candidates promote ethical and l
egal use of technology disciplines.


Pre
-
service teachers follow ethical and legal uses of technology
. Candidates

cite electronic sources when used for a lesson
plan, presentation
,

or paper. Instructors explain the difference between a single user licens
e and a site license for software.



23

National Science Teachers Association

Standards



Alignment of the science education curriculum and experiences with the standards of the National Science Teachers
Association (NSTA) is depicted in the following matri
c
es
.

The first matrix identifies competency requirements expected of
all secondary science teachers. This matrix is followed by matrices identifying competencies
expected for biology,
chemistry, earth science, and physics, respectively.



Integration of N
STA Standards in the Science Education Program


Competency Requirements for All Science Teachers


Competency



All secondary science
teachers should be prepared to lead
students to understand the
unifying
concepts of science

which include the
following:



Required Courses

1.
Multiple ways we organize our
perceptions of the world and how
systems organize the studies and
knowledge of science.

EDC 634 Science Pedagogy in Secondary School

(through campus and school
-
based experiences,
candidates

learn how to e
ngage young people in learning
science and how to make decisions about planning instruction developing
assessment based upon a sound knowledge base for applying content materials
and methods [including educational technology] appropriate for high school
st
udents)


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24

BIO 151, P
rinciples of Biology Laboratory I

(introductory laboratory in which
biological systems are investigated at the cellular and molecular levels)

CHE 115, General Chemistry Laboratory

(separations, synthesis,
measurements, mathematical applications, basic la
boratory


skills, safety)

GLY 220, Principles of Physical Geology

(integrated course in physical
geology covering the physical, chemical, and biological processes that combine
to produce geological processes; attention is focused on plate tectonics, earth
surface processes, and properties and formation of earth materials; laboratory
experiences emphasize identification and interpretation of geological materials
and maps; student report on current, newsworthy, geology topic; surface and
ground water; global
climate change)

4.
Evolution of natural systems and
factors that result in evolution or
equilibrium.

EDC 634 Science Pedagogy in Secondary School

(through campus and school
-
based experiences,
candidate
s learn how to engage young people in learning
scienc
e and how to make decisions about planning instruction developing
assessment based upon a sound knowledge base for applying content materials
and methods [including educational technology] appropriate for high school
students)


[evolution is presented and

discussed as a major unifying theme in
the sciences; arguments are identified regarding rationale for teaching
evolutionary theory in science classes in lieu of “creationist theories” or
theories of “intelligent design”; teachers are encouraged to be sens
itive to the
beliefs of young adults while teaching scientific knowledge and the role of
scientific theories]

BIO 150, Principles of Biology I

(develop appreciation of biological principles
necessary to explore life at the cellular and molecular level; si
milarities and
differences in structure and function of simple and complex cells covered along
with theories on the origin and evolution of biological systems)

BIO 151, Principles of Biology Laboratory I

(introductory laboratory in which
biological system
s are investigated at the cellular and molecular levels)

GLY 220, Principles of Physical Geology

(integrated course in physical
geology covering the physical, chemical, and biological processes that combine
to produce geological processes; attention is foc
used on plate tectonics, earth
surface processes, and properties and formation of earth materials; laboratory
experiences emphasize identification and interpretation of geological materials
and maps; student report on current, newsworthy, geology topic; su
rface and
ground water; global climate change)

CHE 107, General College Chemistry II

(kinetics, acid
-
base, thermodynamics,
electrochemistry, molecular geometry, hybridization, intermolecular forces,
physical properties of solutions, equilibrium)

5.
Inte
rrelationships of form, function,
and behaviors in living and nonliving
systems.

EDC 634 Science Pedagogy in Secondary School

(through campus and school
-
based experiences,
candidates

learn how to engage young people in learning
science and how to make deci
sions about planning instruction developing
assessment based upon a sound knowledge base for applying content materials
and methods [including educational technology] appropriate for high school
students)


[students participate in a field experience (norm
ally a stream study);
observations are made of organisms in the context of their natural environments
focusing on inferring relationships between form and function]

BIO 150, Principles of Biology I

(develop appreciation of biological principles
necessary
to explore life at the cellular and molecular level; similarities and
differences in structure and function of simple and complex cells covered along
with theories on the origin and evolution of biological systems)

GLY 220, Principles of Physical Geology

(
integrated course in physical
geology covering the physical, chemical, and biological processes that combine
to produce geological processes; attention is focused on plate tectonics, earth
surface processes, and properties and formation of earth materials;

laboratory
experiences emphasize identification and interpretation of geological materials
and maps; student report on current, newsworthy, geology topic; surface and
ground water; global climate change)


25

CHE 105, General College Chemistry I

(basic atomic
structure, bonding,
reactions, periodicity, thermodynamics, intermolecular forces, quantum theory,
hybridization, mass relationships in chemical reactions, gases)

CHE 107, General College Chemistry II

(kinetics, acid
-
base, thermodynamics,
electrochemistry
, molecular geometry, hybridization, intermolecular forces,
physical properties of solutions, equilibrium)




26

NSTA Science Content Requirements

for Biology:

Analysis Tables I

(Core Competencies)
, II

(Advanced Competencies)
,
and
III

(Supporting Competencie
s)



Table I: Biology



Core Competencies

A. Core Competencies



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灲数p牥搠do 汥l搠獴畤敮瑳⁴o

摥牳瑡n搠d桥hfo汬lw楮i:




剥煵楲敤R䍯畲s敳

1.
Life processes in living systems
including organization of matter and
energy.

BIO 150, Principles of Biology I

(develop appreciation of biological principles
necessary to explore life at the cellular and mol
ecular level; similarities and
differences in structure and function of simple and complex cells covered along
with theories on the origin and evolution of biological systems)

BIO 151, Principles of Biology Laboratory I

(introductory laboratory in which
b
iological systems are investigated at the cellular and molecular levels)

BIO 152, Principles of Biology II

(designed to develop understanding and
appreciation for diverse forms of plant and animal life, and their relationships
to each other and to their e
nvironment; structure and function relationships will
be explored at many levels of organization: cell tissue, organ, organism,
population, and community)

BIO 153, Principle of Biology Laboratory II

(introductory lab course in which
biological systems ar
e investigated organismal, population and community
levels)

BIO 315, Introduction to Cell Biology

(structure and function of cells;
emphasis placed upon the ultra structure of cell organelles in plants and animals
as a framework for understanding compart
mentalized nature of cell activity)

BCH 401G, Fundamentals of Biochemistry

(Descriptive chemistry of amino acids and proteins, carbohydrates, lipids,
nucleic acids. Discussion of structure and function; metabolism, and
bioenergetics; and biological informa
tion flow.)

2.
Similarities and differences among
animals, plants, fungi, microorganisms,
and viruses

BIO 150, Principles of Biology I

(develop appreciation of biological principles
necessary to explore life at the cellular and molecular level; similarit
ies and
differences in structure and function of simple and complex cells covered along
with theories on the origin and evolution of biological systems)

BIO 151, Principles of Biology Laboratory I

(introductory laboratory in which
biological systems are i
nvestigated at the cellular and molecular levels)

BIO 152, Principles of Biology II

(designed to develop understanding and
appreciation for diverse forms of plant and animal life, and their relationships
to each other and to their environment; structure a
nd function relationships will
be explored at many levels of organization: cell tissue, organ, organism,
population, and community)

BIO 153, Principle of Biology Laboratory II

(introductory lab course in which
biological systems are investigated at organ
ismal, population and community
levels)

3.
Principles and practices of biological
classification

BIO 150, Principles of Biology I

(develop appreciation of biological principles
necessary to explore life at the cellular and molecular level; similarities a
nd
differences in structure and function of simple and complex cells covered along
with theories on the origin and evolution of biological systems)

BIO 151, Principles of Biology Laboratory I

(introductory laboratory in which
biological systems are invest
igated at the cellular and molecular levels)

BIO 152, Principles of Biology II

(designed to develop understanding and
appreciation for diverse forms of plant and animal life, and their relationships
to each other and to their environment; structure and fu
nction relationships will
be explored at many levels of organization: cell tissue, organ, organism,
population, and community)


27

BIO 153, Principle of Biology Laboratory II

(introductory lab course in which
biological systems are investigated at organismal
, population and community
levels)

Biology 351, Plant Kingdom [Upper Level Botany Course



most commonly
selected] (evolutionary survey of morphology, taxonomy, life histories, and
biological relationships of all plant groups comprising plant kingdom)

4.

Scientific t
heory and principles of
biological evolution

BIO 150, Principles of Biology I

(develop appreciation of biological principles
necessary to explore life at the cellular and molecular level; similarities and
differences in structure and function

of simple and complex cells covered along
with theories on the origin and evolution of biological systems)

Biology 351, Plant Kingdom [Upper Level Botany Course



most commonly
selected] (evolutionary survey of morphology, taxonomy, life histories, and
b
iological relationships of all plant groups comprising plant kingdom)

5.
Ecological systems
including the
interrelationships and dependencies of
organisms with each other and their
environments


BIO 152, Principles of Biology II

(designed to develop unde
rstanding and
appreciation for diverse forms of plant and animal life, and their relationships
to each other and to their environment; structure and function relationships will
be explored at many levels of organization: cell tissue, organ, organism,
popu
lation, and community)

BIO 325, Introductory Ecology

(basic concepts of ecology; topics include
adaptations of organisms to environment; factors that influence distribution and
abundance of species; population structure, dynamics, and regulation;
communit
y development


succession
-

, structure and function; food webs,
energy flow, and nutrient cycling)

6.
Population dynamics and
the impact
of
population
on its environment

BIO 152, Principles of Biology II

(designed to develop understanding and
appreciati
on for diverse forms of plant and animal life, and their relationships
to each other and to their environment; structure and function relationships will
be explored at many levels of organization: cell tissue, organ, organism,
population, and community)

B
IO 153, Principle of Biology Laboratory II

(introductory lab course in which
biological systems are investigated at organismal, population and community
levels)

BIO 325, Introductory Ecology

(basic concepts of ecology; topics include
adaptations of organ
isms to environment; factors that influence distribution and
abundance of species; population structure, dynamics, and regulation;
community development


succession
-

, structure and function; food webs,
energy flow, and nutrient cycling)

7.
General conce
pts of genetics and
heredity

BIO 304, Principles of Genetics

(study of the physical and chemical aspects of
the genetic material and their relationship to the expression and inheritance of
the phenotype)

8.
Organization and functions of c
ells
and multicel
lular systems

BIO 150, Principles of Biology I

(develop appreciation of biological principles
necessary to explore life at the cellular and molecular level; similarities and
differences in structure and function of simple and complex cells covered along
w
ith theories on the origin and evolution of biological systems)

BIO 152, Principles of Biology II

(designed to develop understanding and
appreciation for diverse forms of plant and animal life, and their relationships
to each other and to their environmen
t; structure and function relationships will
be explored at many levels of organization: cell tissue, organ, organism,
population, and community)

BIO 315, Introduction to Cell Biology

(structure and function of cells;
emphasis placed upon the ultra struc
ture of cell organelles in plants and animals
as a framework for understanding compartmentalized nature of cell activity)

9.
Behavior of organisms and
their
relationships to
social systems

BIO 325, Introductory Ecology

(basic concepts of ecology; topics
include
adaptations of organisms to environment; factors that influence distribution and
abundance of species; population structure, dynamics, and regulation;
community development


succession
-

, structure and function; food webs,
energy flow, and nutrien
t cycling)

BIO 350, Animal Physiology

(introduction basic principles of animal
physiology; elementary discussion of major vertebrae organ systems including

28

nutrition, metabolism, respiration, circulation, excretion, muscle contraction,
peripheral and cent
ral nervous system, and endocrine function; emphasizing
homeostasis; behavior; energy expenditure and energetic costs)

10.
Regulation of biological systems
including homeostatic mechanisms

BIO 325, Introductory Ecology

(basic concepts of ecology; topics
include
adaptations of organisms to environment; factors that influence distribution and
abundance of species; population structure, dynamics, and regulation;
community development


succession
-

, structure and function; food webs,
energy flow, and nutrien
t cycling)

BIO 350, Animal Physiology

(introduction basic principles of animal
physiology; elementary discussion of major vertebrae organ systems including
nutrition, metabolism, respiration, circulation, excretion, muscle contraction,
peripheral and cent
ral nervous system, and endocrine function; emphasizing
homeostasis; behavior; energy expenditure and energetic costs)

11.
Fundamental processes of
modeling and investigating in the
biological sciences

BIO 151, Principles of Biology Laboratory I

(introdu
ctory laboratory in which
biological systems are investigated at the cellular and molecular levels)

BIO 153, Principle of Biology Laboratory II

(introductory lab course in which
biological systems are investigated at organismal, population and community
l
evels)

12.
Applications of biology in
environmental quality and in personal
and community health

BIO 152, Principles of Biology II

(designed to develop understanding and
appreciation for diverse forms of plant and animal life, and their relationships
to
each other and to their environment; structure and function relationships will
be explored at many levels of organization: cell tissue, organ, organism,
population, and community)

BIO 325, Introductory Ecology

(basic concepts of ecology; topics include
a
daptations of organisms to environment; factors that influence distribution and
abundance of species; population structure, dynamics, and regulation;
community development


succession
-

, structure and function; food webs,
energy flow, and nutrient cycling
)

BIO 350, Animal Physiology

(introduction basic principles of animal
physiology; elementary discussion of major vertebrae organ systems including
nutrition, metabolism, respiration, circulation, excretion, muscle contraction,
peripheral and central nervo
us system, and endocrine function; emphasizing
homeostasis; behavior; energy expenditure and energetic costs)


Table II: Biology



Advanced Competencies

B. Advanced Competencies



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t敡捨敲s of 扩b汯gy as a 灲pma特 f楥汤i
s
桯畬u 扥b灲数p牥搠do 敦f散tiv敬e
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剥煵楲敤R䍯畲s敳

13.
Bioenergetics and major
biochemical pathways

BIO 315, Introduction to Cell Biology

(structure and function of cells;
emphasis placed upon the ultra structure of cell org
anelles in plants and animals
as a framework for understanding compartmentalized nature of cell activity)

BIO 350, Animal Physiology

(introduction basic principles of animal
physiology; elementary discussion of major vertebrae organ systems including
nutr
ition, metabolism, respiration, circulation, excretion, muscle contraction,
peripheral and central nervous system, and endocrine function; emphasizing
homeostasis; behavior; energy expenditure and energetic costs)

BCH 401G, Fundamentals of Biochemistry

(De
scriptive chemistry of amino acids and proteins, carbohydrates, lipids,
nucleic acids. Discussion of structure and function; metabolism, and
bioenergetics; and biological information flow.)

14.
Biochemical interactions of
organisms
with their

environments

BIO 152, Principles of Biology II

(designed to develop understanding and
appreciation for diverse forms of plant and animal life, and their relationships
to each other and to their environment; structure and function relationships will
be explored at man
y levels of organization: cell tissue, organ, organism,
population, and community)

BIO 325, Introductory Ecology

(basic concepts of ecology; topics include

29

adaptations of organisms to environment; factors that influence distribution and
abundance of spec
ies; population structure, dynamics, and regulation;
community development


succession
-

, structure and function; food webs,
energy flow, and nutrient cycling)

15.
Molecular genetics and heredity
and mechanisms of genetic
modification

BIO 304, Principles

of Genetics

(study of the physical and chemical aspects of
the genetic material and their relationship to the expression and inheritance of
the phenotype)

16.
Molecular basis for evolutionary
theory and classification

BIO 150, Principles of Biology I

(d
evelop appreciation of biological principles
necessary to explore life at the cellular and molecular level; similarities and
differences in structure and function of simple and complex cells covered along
with theories on the origin and evolution of biolog
ical systems)

BIO 151, Principles of Biology Laboratory I

(introductory laboratory in which
biological systems are investigated at the cellular and molecular levels)

Biology 351, Plant Kingdom [Upper Level Botany Course



most commonly
selected] (evoluti
onary survey of morphology, taxonomy, life histories, and
biological relationships of all plant groups comprising plant kingdom)

17.
Causes, characteristics, and
avoidance of viral, bacterial, and
parasitic diseases


18.
Issues

related to living systems

such as genetic modification, uses of
biotechnology, cloning, and pollution
from farming


19.
Historical development and
perspectives in biology including
contributions of significant figures and
underrepresented groups, and the
evolution of theories in b
iology


20.
How to design, conduct, and report
research in biology

BIO 151, Principles of Biology Laboratory I

(introductory laboratory in which
biological systems are investigated at the cellular and molecular levels)

BIO 153, Principle of Biology Labor
atory II

(introductory lab course in which
biological systems are investigated at organismal, population and community
levels)

21.
Applications of biology and
biotechnology in society, business,
industry, and health fields



Table III: Biology



Suppor
ting Competencies

C. Supporting Competencies



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t敡捨敲s of 扩b汯gy s桯畬u a汳o 扥b
灲数p牥搠do 敦f散t楶敬e a灰汹
捯湣数ns f牯m ot桥爠s捩c湣敳 a湤
mat桥mat楣s to t桥ht敡捨楮c of
扩b汯gy 楮捬i摩dg 扡s楣i捯湣数es of:



剥煵楲敤R䍯畲s敳

22.
Chemistry, incl
uding general
chemistry and biochemistry with basic
laboratory techniques.

CHE 105, General College Chemistry I

(basic atomic structure, bonding,
reactions, periodicity, thermodynamics, intermolecular forces, quantum theory,
hybridization, mass relationshi
ps in chemical reactions, gases)

CHE 107, General College Chemistry II

(kinetics, acid
-
base, thermodynamics,
electrochemistry, molecular geometry, hybridization, intermolecular forces,
physical properties of solutions, equilibrium)

CHE 115, General Chemis
try Laboratory

(separations, synthesis,
measurements, mathematical applications, basic laboratory


skills, safety)

CHE 230, General Organic Chemistry I

(
content can be classified as
structure,
reactivity, and synthesis;.

how atoms are joined together in o
rganic compounds,
how structure affects bulk properties, how scientists can gain information about
the structure of unknown organic compounds, and how organic compounds are
transformed into other organic compounds)


30

CHE 231, Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

(recrystallization, solvent
extraction, fractional distillation, thin layer chromatography, Grignard reaction,
multi
-
step synthesis)

CHE 232, General Organic Chemistry II

(complex reactions and systems;
polyenes and aromatic compounds; highly functionaliz
ed systems such as
alcohols, amines, amino acids, carbohydrates)

CHE 233, Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

(infrared spectroscopy;
classification tests and derivatives; GC/MS [gas chromatography and mass
spectrometry]; identification of compounds; separati
ons)

BCH 401G, Fundamentals of Biochemistry
[Recommended] (Descriptive
chemistry of amino acids and proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids.
Discussion of structure and function; metabolism, and bioenergetics; and
biological information flow.)

23
.
Physics including light, sound,
optics, electricity, energy and order,
magnetism, and thermodynamics.

PHY 211, General Physics

(survey of classical and modern physics focusing
on the motion of solids and fluids as governed by Newton’s laws and by the
co
nservation law of energy, momentum, and angular momentum)

PHY 213, General Physics

(electrostatics, dc circuits, magnetism, Maxwell’s
equations, electromagnetic radiation, light, and modern physics)

24.
Earth and space sciences including
energy and geoche
mical cycles,
climate, oceans, weather, natural
resources, and changes in the Earth.

GLY 220, Principles of Physical Geology

(integrated course in physical
geology covering the physical, chemical, and biological processes that combine
to produce geological

processes; attention is focused on plate tectonics, earth
surface processes, and properties and formation of earth materials; laboratory
experiences emphasize identification and interpretation of geological materials
and maps; student report on current, n
ewsworthy, geology topic; surface and
ground water; global climate change)

25.
Mathematics, including probability
and statistics

MA 123, Elementary Calculus
(introduction to differential and integral
calculus with applications to business and biological
and physical sciences)
or

MA 132, Calculus for Life Sciences

(introduction to integral calculus,
integration of logarithmic and exponential functions; application to life sciences
including biochemical rates, reactions, and radioactive decay; introduction

to
biological models and their associated differential equations)
or

MA 113, Calculus I

(course in one variable calculus, including topics from
analytic geometry; derivatives and integrals of elementary functions


including
trigonometric functions


wit
h applications)



31

NSTA S
cience Content Requirement
s

for Chemistry:


Analysis Tables I

(Core Competencies)
, II

(Advanced Competencies)
,
and
III

(Supporting Competencies)




Table I: Chemistry



Core Competencies

A. Core Competencies



䅬氠A敡捨敲s
of 捨cm
ist特 s桯畬u 扥b灲数a牥搠do
汥l搠獴畤敮瑳⁴o 畮摥牳瑡湤 t桥h
畮楦y楮i 捯湣数ns 牥煵楲i搠df a汬l
t敡捨敲s of s捩敮捥, a湤 s桯u汤⁩渠
a摤楴楯渠扥n灲数p牥搠do 汥l搠
st畤敮es to 畮摥牳瑡湤:




剥煵楲敤R䍯畲s敳

1.
Fundamental structures of atoms and
molecules

CHE
105, General College Chemistry I

(basic atomic structure, bonding,
reactions, periodicity, thermodynamics, intermolecular forces, quantum theory,
hybridization, mass relationships in chemical reactions, gases)

CHE 107, General College Chemistry II

(kineti
cs, acid
-
base, thermodynamics,
electrochemistry, molecular geometry, hybridization, intermolecular forces,
physical properties of solutions, equilibrium)

CHE 115, General Chemistry Laboratory

(separations, synthesis,
measurements, mathematical applications
, basic laboratory skills, safety)

2.
Basic principles of ionic, covalent,
and metallic bonding

CHE 105, General College Chemistry I

(basic atomic structure, bonding,
reactions, periodicity, thermodynamics, intermolecular forces, quantum theory,
hybridiza
tion, mass relationships in chemical reactions, gases)

3.
Physical and chemical properties
and classification of elements
including periodicity

CHE 105, General College Chemistry I

(basic atomic structure, bonding,
reactions, periodicity, thermodynamics,
intermolecular forces, quantum theory,
hybridization, mass relationships in chemical reactions, gases)

4.
Chemical kinetics and
thermodynamics

CHE 105, General College Chemistry I

(basic atomic structure, bonding,
reactions, periodicity, thermodynamics, i
ntermolecular forces, quantum theory,
hybridization, mass relationships in chemical reactions, gases)

CHE 107, General College Chemistry II

(kinetics, acid
-
base, thermodynamics,
electrochemistry, molecular geometry, hybridization, intermolecular forces,
p
hysical properties of solutions, equilibrium)

CHE 440G, Introductory Physical Chemistry

(introduction to the laws of
thermodynamics, the thermodynamics functions and their application to phase
equilibria, chemical equilibria, solutions and electrochemistry
; chemical
kinetics, including rate laws, reaction mechanism; Arrhenius, collision, and
activated complex theories, and catalysis; quantum theory including an
elementary introduction to spectroscopy)

5.
Principles of electrochemistry

CHE 107, General Coll
ege Chemistry II

(kinetics, acid
-
base, thermodynamics,
electrochemistry, molecular geometry, hybridization, intermolecular forces,
physical properties of solutions, equilibrium)

CHE 226, Analytical Chemistry

(stoichiometry, concentration, experimental
err
or, statistical analysis, gravimetric analysis, chemical equilibrium, electrolyte
effects, equilibrium in complex systems, acid
-
base titrations, spectrochemical
analysis, electrochemistry, electrode potentials, oxidation and reduction
titrations, potentiom
etry)

CHE 440G, Introductory Physical Chemistry

(introduction to the laws of
thermodynamics, the thermodynamics functions and their application to phase
equilibria, chemical equilibria, solutions and electrochemistry; chemical
kinetics, including rate laws
, reaction mechanism; Arrhenius, collision, and
activated complex theories, and catalysis; quantum theory including an
elementary introduction to spectroscopy)

6.
Mole concept, stoichiometry, and
laws of composition

CHE 105, General College Chemistry I

(
basic atomic structure, bonding,
reactions, periodicity, thermodynamics, intermolecular forces, quantum theory,
hybridization, mass relationships in chemical reactions, gases)

CHE 107, General College Chemistry II

(kinetics, acid
-
base, thermodynamics,
ele
ctrochemistry, molecular geometry, hybridization, intermolecular forces,
physical properties of solutions, equilibrium)


32

CHE 226, Analytical Chemistry

(stoichiometry, concentration, experimental
error, statistical analysis, gravimetric analysis, chemical eq
uilibrium, electrolyte
effects, equilibrium in complex systems, acid
-
base titrations, spectrochemical
analysis, electrochemistry, electrode potentials, oxidation and reduction
titrations, potentiometry)

7.
Transition elements and
coordination compounds


8.
Acids and bases, oxidation
-
reduction
chemistry, and solutions

CHE 107, General College Chemistry II

(kinetics, acid
-
base, thermodynamics,
electrochemistry, molecular geometry, hybridization, intermolecular forces,
physical properties of solutions, equi
librium)

CHE 226, Analytical Chemistry

(stoichiometry, concentration, experimental
error, statistical analysis, gravimetric analysis, chemical equilibrium, electrolyte
effects, equilibrium in complex systems, acid
-
base titrations, spectrochemical
analysis,

electrochemistry, electrode potentials, oxidation and reduction
titrations, potentiometry)

9.
Fundamental biochemistry

BCH 401G, Fundamentals of Biochemistry

(Descriptive chemistry of amino acids and proteins, carbohydrates, lipids,
nucleic acids. Discus
sion of structure and function; metabolism, and
bioenergetics; and biological information flow.)

10.
Functional and polyfunctional
group chemistry

CHE 230, General Organic Chemistry I

(
content can be classified as
structure,
reactivity, and synthesis;.

ho
w atoms are joined together in organic compounds,
how structure affects bulk properties, how scientists can gain information about
the structure of unknown organic compounds, and how organic compounds are
transformed into other organic compounds)

CHE 232,
General Organic Chemistry II

(complex reactions and systems;
polyenes and aromatic compounds; highly functionalized systems such as
alcohols, amines, amino acids, carbohydrates)

11.
Environmental and atmospheric
chemistry


12.
Fundamental processes of
i
nvestigating in chemistry

CHE 115, General Chemistry Laboratory

(separations, synthesis,
measurements, mathematical applications, basic laboratory skills, safety)

CHE 226, Analytical Chemistry

(stoichiometry, concentration, experimental
error, statistical
analysis, gravimetric analysis, chemical equilibrium, electrolyte
effects, equilibrium in complex systems, acid
-
base titrations, spectrochemical
analysis, electrochemistry, electrode potentials, oxidation and reduction
titrations, potentiometry)

CHE 231, O
rganic Chemistry Laboratory I

(recrystallization, solvent
extraction, fractional distillation, thin layer chromatography, Grignard reaction,
multi
-
step synthesis)

CHE 233, Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

(infrared spectroscopy;
classification tests and d
erivatives; GC/MS [gas chromatography and mass
spectrometry]; identification of compounds; separations)

13.
Applications of chemistry in
personal and community health and
environmental quality

CHE 105, General College Chemistry I

(basic atomic structure,
bonding,
reactions, periodicity, thermodynamics, intermolecular forces)


Integrated in
multiple chapters in the course: Chang, Chapter 3, electron microscopy; Chang,
Chapter 7, chemical fertilizers; Chang, Chapter 10, fuel values of food and
other substan
ces.

CHE 107, General College Chemistry II

(kinetics, acid
-
base, thermodynamics,
electrochemistry, molecular geometry, hybridization, intermolecular forces,
physical properties of solutions, equilibrium)
-

Chang, Chapter 15, antacids and
the pH balance in

your stomach; Chang, Chapter 16, maintaining the pH of
blood; Chang, Chapter 18, tainted water.


Table II: Chemistry



Advanced Competencies

B. Advanced Competencies



I渠
a摤楴楯渠no t桥h捯牥 捯m灥pe湣楥猬n
t敡捨敲s of 捨cmist特 as a 灲pma特
f楥汤⁳io畬d

a汳o 扥b灲数p牥搠do


剥煵楲敤R䍯畲s敳


33

effectively lead students to
understand:

14.
Molecular orbital theory,
aromaticity, metallic and ionic
structures, and correlation to properties
of matter

CHE 232, General Organic Chemistry II

(complex reactions an
d systems;
polyenes and aromatic compounds; highly functionalized systems such as
alcohols, amines, amino acids, carbohydrates)

15.
Superconductors and principles of
metallurgy


16.
Advanced concepts of chemical
kinetics, and thermodynamics

CHE 226, Anal
ytical Chemistry

(stoichiometry, concentration, experimental
error, statistical analysis, gravimetric analysis, chemical equilibrium, electrolyte
effects, equilibrium in complex systems, acid
-
base titrations, spectrochemical
analysis, electrochemistry, ele
ctrode potentials, oxidation and reduction
titrations, potentiometry)

CHE 440G, Introductory Physical Chemistry

(introduction to the laws of
thermodynamics, the thermodynamics functions and their application to phase
equilibria, chemical equilibria, solut
ions and electrochemistry; chemical
kinetics, including rate laws, reaction mechanism; Arrhenius, collision, and
activated complex theories, and catalysis; quantum theory including an
elementary introduction to spectroscopy)

17. L
ewis adducts and coordina
tion
compounds


18.
Solutions, colloids, and colligative
properties

CHE 440G, Introductory Physical Chemistry

(introduction to the laws of
thermodynamics, the thermodynamics functions and their application to phase
equilibria, chemical equilibria, solutio
ns and electrochemistry; chemical
kinetics, including rate laws, reaction mechanism; Arrhenius, collision, and
activated complex theories, and catalysis; quantum theory including an
elementary introduction to spectroscopy)

19.
Major biological compounds a
nd
natural products

CHE 230, General Organic Chemistry I

(
content can be classified as
structure,
reactivity, and synthesis;.

how atoms are joined together in organic compounds,
how structure affects bulk properties, how scientists can gain information abo
ut
the structure of unknown organic compounds, and how organic compounds are
transformed into other organic compounds)

CHE 231, Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

(recrystallization, solvent
extraction, fractional distillation, thin layer chromatography, Grig
nard reaction,
multi
-
step synthesis)

CHE 232, General Organic Chemistry II

(complex reactions and systems;
polyenes and aromatic compounds; highly functionalized systems such as
alcohols, amines, amino acids, carbohydrates)

CHE 233, Organic Chemistry Labo
ratory II

(infrared spectroscopy;
classification tests and derivatives; GC/MS [gas chromatography and mass
spectrometry]; identification of compounds; separations)

BCH 401G, Fundamentals of Biochemistry

(Descriptive chemistry of amino acids and proteins,
carbohydrates, lipids,
nucleic acids. Discussion of structure and function; metabolism, and
bioenergetics; and biological information flow.)

20.
Solvent system concepts including
non
-
aqueous solvents

CHE 226, Analytical Chemistry

(stoichiometry, concentra
tion, experimental
error, statistical analysis, gravimetric analysis, chemical equilibrium, electrolyte
effects, equilibrium in complex systems, acid
-
base titrations, spectrochemical
analysis, electrochemistry, electrode potentials, oxidation and reduction

titrations, potentiometry)

21.
Chemical reactivity and molecular
structure including electronic and steric
effects

CHE 230, General Organic Chemistry I

(
content can be classified as
structure,
reactivity, and synthesis;.

how atoms are joined together in
organic compounds,
how structure affects bulk properties, how scientists can gain information about
the structure of unknown organic compounds, and how organic compounds are
transformed into other organic compounds)

CHE 232, General Organic Chemistry II

(
complex reactions and systems;
polyenes and aromatic compounds; highly functionalized systems such as
alcohols, amines, amino acids, carbohydrates)


34

BCH 401G, Fundamentals of Biochemistry

(Descriptive chemistry of amino acids and proteins, carbohydrates, li
pids,
nucleic acids. Discussion of structure and function; metabolism, and
bioenergetics; and biological information flow.)

22.
Organic synthesis and organic
reaction mechanisms

CHE 230, General Organic Chemistry I

(
content can be classified as
structure,

reactivity, and synthesis;.

how atoms are joined together in organic compounds,
how structure affects bulk properties, how scientists can gain information about
the structure of unknown organic compounds, and how organic compounds are
transformed into oth
er organic compounds)

CHE 231, Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

(recrystallization, solvent
extraction, fractional distillation, thin layer chromatography, Grignard reaction,
multi
-
step synthesis)

CHE 232, General Organic Chemistry II

(complex reactions an
d systems;
polyenes and aromatic compounds; highly functionalized systems such as
alcohols, amines, amino acids, carbohydrates)

CHE 233, Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

(infrared spectroscopy;
classification tests and derivatives; GC/MS [gas chromatograph
y and mass
spectrometry]; identification of compounds; separations)

BCH 401G, Fundamentals of Biochemistry

(Descriptive chemistry of amino acids and proteins, carbohydrates, lipids,
nucleic acids. Discussion of structure and function; metabolism, and
bioen
ergetics; and biological information flow.)

23.
Energy flow through chemical
systems

CHE 440G, Introductory Physical Chemistry

(introduction to the laws of
thermodynamics, the thermodynamics functions and their application to phase
equilibria, chemical eq
uilibria, solutions and electrochemistry; chemical
kinetics, including rate laws, reaction mechanism; Arrhenius, collision, and
activated complex theories, and catalysis; quantum theory including an
elementary introduction to spectroscopy)

BCH 401G, Fundam
entals of Biochemistry

(Descriptive chemistry of amino acids and proteins, carbohydrates, lipids,
nucleic acids. Discussion of structure and function; metabolism, and
bioenergetics; and biological information flow.)

24.
Issues

related to chemistry

includi
ng ground water pollution,
disposal of plastics, and development
of alternative fuels

CHE 105, General College Chemistry I

(basic atomic structure, bonding,
reactions, periodicity, thermodynamics, intermolecular forces)


Integrated in
multiple chapters in

the course: Chang, Chapter 8, an undesirable precipitation
reaction.

CHE 107, General College Chemistry II

(kinetics, acid
-
base, thermodynamics,
electrochemistry, molecular geometry, hybridization, intermolecular forces,
physical properties of solutions,

equilibrium)


Chang, Chapter 12, the killer
lake; Chang, Chapter 15, decaying papers; Chang, Chapter 18, tainted water.

25.
Historical development and
perspectives in chemistry including
contributions of significant figures and
underrepresented groups,
and the
evolution of theories in chemistry

CHE 105, General College Chemistry I

(basic atomic structure, bonding,
reactions, periodicity, thermodynamics, intermolecular forces)

CHE 107, General College Chemistry II

(kinetics, acid
-
base, thermodynamics,
el
ectrochemistry, molecular geometry, hybridization, intermolecular forces,
physical properties of solutions, equilibrium)

26.
How to design, conduct, and report
research in chemistry

CHE 115, General Chemistry Laboratory

(separations, synthesis,
measuremen
ts, mathematical applications, basic laboratory skills, safety)

CHE 231, Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

(recrystallization, solvent
extraction, fractional distillation, thin layer chromatography, Grignard reaction,
multi
-
step synthesis)

CHE 233, Organic C
hemistry Laboratory II

(infrared spectroscopy;
classification tests and derivatives; GC/MS [gas chromatography and mass
spectrometry]; identification of compounds; separations)

27.
Applications of chemistry and
chemical technology in society,
business, i
ndustry, and health fields

CHE 105, General College Chemistry I

(basic atomic structure, bonding,
reactions, periodicity, thermodynamics, intermolecular forces)


Integrated in
multiple chapters in the course: Chang, Chapter 2, distribution of elements on
earth and in living systems; Chang, Chapter 3, laser


the splendid light, Chang,
Chapter 3, electron microscopy; Chang, Chapter 6, microwave ovens


dipole

35

moments at work; Chang, Chapter 7, chemical fertilizers; Chang, Chapter 8,
breath analyzer; Chang,
Chapter 9, scuba diving and the gas laws; Chang,
Chapter 10, making snow and inflating a bicycle tire; Chang, Chapter 10, fuel
values of food and other substances; Chang, Chapter 11, pressure cookers and
ice skating.

CHE 107, General College Chemistry II

(kinetics, acid
-
base, thermodynamics,
electrochemistry, molecular geometry, hybridization, intermolecular forces,
physical properties of solutions, equilibrium)


Chang, Chapter 12,
desalination; Chang, Chapter 13, determining the age of the Shroud of Turi
n;
Chang, Chapter 15, antacids and the pH balance in your stomach; Chang,
Chapter 16, maintaining the pH of blood.


Table III: Chemistry



Supporting Competencies

C. Supporting Competencies



䅬氠
t敡捨敲s of 捨cmist特 s桯畬u 扥b
灲数p牥搠do 敦f散t楶敬e ap
灬p
捯湣数ns f牯m ot桥爠s捩c湣敳 a湤
mat桥mat楣s to t桥ht敡捨楮c of
捨cm楳t特 楮捬畤楮i:



剥煵楲敤R䍯畲s敳

28.
Biology
, including
molecular
biology, bioenergetics, and ecology

BIO 150, Principles of Biology I

(develop appreciation of biological principl
es
necessary to explore life at the cellular and molecular level; similarities and
differences in structure and function of simple and complex cells covered along
with theories on the origin and evolution of biological systems)

BIO 151, Principles of Biolo
gy Laboratory I

(introductory laboratory in which
biological systems are investigated at the cellular and molecular levels)

29.
Earth science
,

including

geochemistry, geocycles, and
energetics of earth systems

GLY 220, Principles of Physical Geology

(in
tegrated course in physical
geology covering the physical, chemical, and biological processes that combine
to produce geological processes; attention is focused on plate tectonics, earth
surface processes, and properties and formation of earth materials; l
aboratory
experiences emphasize identification and interpretation of geological materials
and maps)

30.
Physics, including
energy, stellar
evolution,
properties and functions of
waves, motions and
forces, electricity,
magnetism

PHY 211, General Physics

(
survey of classical and modern physics focusing
on the motion of solids and fluids as governed by Newton’s laws and by the
conservation law of energy, momentum, and angular momentum)

PHY 213, General Physics

(electrostatics, dc circuits, magnetism, Maxwell
’s
equations, electromagnetic radiation, light, and modern physics)

31.
Math
ematical and st
atistic
al
concepts and skills including statistics
and the use of

differential equations
and calculus

MA 113, Calculus I

(course in one variable calculus, includin
g topics from
analytic geometry; derivatives and integrals of elementary functions


including
trigonometric functions


with applications)

MA 114, Calculus II

(stressing techniques of integration)

CHE 226, Analytical Chemistry

(stoichiometry, concentratio
n, experimental
error, statistical analysis, gravimetric analysis, chemical equilibrium, electrolyte
effects, equilibrium in complex systems, acid
-
base titrations, spectrochemical
analysis, electrochemistry, electrode potentials, oxidation and reduction
ti
trations, potentiometry)




36

NSTA S
cience Content Requirement
s

for the Earth/Space Sciences:

Analysis Tables I

(Core Competencies)
, II

(Advanced Competencies)
,
and
III

(Supporting Competencies)



Table I: Earth/
S
pace
S
cience
s



Core Competencies

A. Core C
ompetencies



䅬氠A敡捨敲s
of t桥hEa牴栠h湤 s灡捥 s捩敮捥s
s桯畬u 扥b灲数p牥搠do 汥l搠dt畤敮es
to 畮摥牳瑡湤 t桥h畮楦y楮i co湣数ns
牥煵楲敤iof a汬⁴敡捨敲s of s捩敮捥,
a湤 s桯畬搠楮⁡摤楴楯渠扥n灲数e牥搠
to 汥l搠獴畤敮瑳⁴o 畮摥牳瑡湤:




剥煵楲敤R䍯畲s敳

1.
Characteristics of land, atmosphere,
and
ocean systems

on Earth


GEO 251, Weather and Climate
(survey of atmospheric controls associated
with local, regional, and global weather and climate variability; includes
fundamental coverage of physics and chem
istry of energy, gases, pressure, and
moisture, with a goal of promoting understanding of general weather analysis
and forecasting, severe storms, atmospheric pollution, descriptive climatology,
and global climate change)
OR

GEO 130, Earth’s Physical Envi
ronment

(exploring the fundamental
characteristics of earth’s physical environment; emphasis placed on identifying
interrelationships between atmospheric processes involving energy, pressure,
and moisture, weather and climate, and terrestrial processes of

vegetative
biomes, soils, and landscape formation and change)

2.
Properties, measurement
, and

classification of Earth materials

GLY 220, Principles of Physical Geology

(integrated course in physical
geology covering the physical, chemical, and biological

processes that combine
to produce geological processes; attention is focused on plate tectonics, earth
surface processes, and properties and formation of earth materials; laboratory
experiences emphasize identification and interpretation of geological mat
erials
and maps)

GLY 230, Fundamentals of Geology I
(field and laboratory methods for
identification and description of rocks and minerals with emphasis on
sedimentary rocks and rock forming minerals; field study of geologic
structures; interpretation of
geologic maps)

GLY 235, Fundamentals of Geology II

(laboratory and field methods for
identification and description of rocks and minerals with emphasis on igneous
and metamorphic rocks and rock forming minerals; field study of geologic
structures; interpr
etation of geologic maps)

3.
Changes in the
Earth including

land
formation and erosion

GLY 220, Principles of Physical Geology

(integrated course in physical
geology covering the physical, chemical, and biological processes that combine
to produce geologi
cal processes; attention is focused on plate tectonics, earth
surface processes, and properties and formation of earth materials; laboratory
experiences emphasize identification and interpretation of geological materials
and maps)

4.
Geochemical cycles
in
cluding
biotic
and abiotic systems

GLY 220, Principles of Physical Geology

(integrated course in physical
geology covering the physical, chemical, and biological processes that combine
to produce geological processes; attention is focused on plate tectonic
s, earth
surface processes, and properties and formation of earth materials; laboratory
experiences emphasize identification and interpretation of geological materials
and maps)

GEO 251, Weather and Climate
(survey of atmospheric controls associated
with
local, regional, and global weather and climate variability; includes
fundamental coverage of physics and chemistry of energy, gases, pressure, and
moisture, with a goal of promoting understanding of general weather analysis
and forecasting, severe storms,

atmospheric pollution, descriptive climatology,
and global climate change)
OR

GEO 130, Earth’s Physical Environment

(exploring the fundamental
characteristics of earth’s physical environment; emphasis placed on identifying
interrelationships between atm
ospheric processes involving energy, pressure,

37

and moisture, weather and climate, and terrestrial processes of vegetative
biomes, soils, and landscape formation and change)

5.
Energy flow and transformation in
Earth systems

GEO 251, Weather and Climate
(
survey of atmospheric controls associated
with local, regional, and global weather and climate variability; includes
fundamental coverage of physics and chemistry of energy, gases, pressure, and
moisture, with a goal of promoting understanding of general w
eather analysis
and forecasting, severe storms, atmospheric pollution, descriptive climatology,
and global climate change)
OR

GEO 130, Earth’s Physical Environment

(exploring the fundamental
characteristics of earth’s physical environment; emphasis place
d on identifying
interrelationships between atmospheric processes involving energy, pressure,
and moisture, weather and climate, and terrestrial processes of vegetative
biomes, soils, and landscape formation and change)

6.
Hydrological features of the Ear
th

GLY 220, Principles of Physical Geology

(integrated course in physical
geology covering the physical, chemical, and biological processes that combine
to produce geological processes; attention is focused on plate tectonics, earth
surface processes, and
properties and formation of earth materials; laboratory
experiences emphasize identification and interpretation of geological materials
and maps)

7. Patterns and changes in the
a
tmosphere, weather, and climate

GEO 251, Weather and Climate
(survey of atmo
spheric controls associated
with local, regional, and global weather and climate variability; includes
fundamental coverage of physics and chemistry of energy, gases, pressure, and
moisture, with a goal of promoting understanding of general weather analysi
s
and forecasting, severe storms, atmospheric pollution, descriptive climatology,
and global climate change)
OR

GEO 130, Earth’s Physical Environment

(exploring the fundamental
characteristics of earth’s physical environment; emphasis placed on identifyi
ng
interrelationships between atmospheric processes involving energy, pressure,
and moisture, weather and climate, and terrestrial processes of vegetative
biomes, soils, and landscape formation and change)

8.
Origin, evolution, and planetary
behaviors of

Earth

AST 191, The Solar System
(emphasizing nature, origin, and evolution of
planets, satellites, and other objects in the solar system; topics also include
historical astronomy, the naked eye phenomenon of the sky and modern solar
system discoveries ma
de by spacecraft)

9.
Origin, evolution, and properties of
the universe

AST 192, Stars Galaxies and The Universe

[Recommended] (covering the
universe outside the solar system; a principal theme is the origin and evolution
of stars, galaxies, and the univ
erse at large; topics also include black holes,
quasars, and the big bang model of the universe)

10.
Fundamental processes of
investigating in the Earth and space
sciences

GLY 220, Principles of Physical Geology

(integrated course in physical
geology cove
ring the physical, chemical, and biological processes that combine
to produce geological processes; attention is focused on plate tectonics, earth
surface processes, and properties and formation of earth materials; laboratory
experiences emphasize identifi
cation and interpretation of geological materials
and maps)

GLY 230, Fundamentals of Geology I
(field and laboratory methods for
identification and description of rocks and minerals with emphasis on
sedimentary rocks and rock forming minerals; field study

of geologic
structures; interpretation of geologic maps)

GLY 235, Fundamentals of Geology II

(laboratory and field methods for
identification and description of rocks and minerals with emphasis on igneous
and metamorphic rocks and rock forming minerals;
field study of geologic
structures; interpretation of geologic maps)

11.
Sources and limits of natural
resources


12.
Applications
of Earth and space
sciences
to environmental quality and
to personal and community health and
welfare

GEO 251, Weather and
Climate
(survey of atmospheric controls associated
with local, regional, and global weather and climate variability; includes
fundamental coverage of physics and chemistry of energy, gases, pressure, and
moisture, with a goal of promoting understanding of

general weather analysis

38

and forecasting, severe storms, atmospheric pollution, descriptive climatology,
and global climate change)
OR

GEO 130, Earth’s Physical Environment

(exploring the fundamental
characteristics of earth’s physical environment; emph
asis placed on identifying
interrelationships between atmospheric processes involving energy, pressure,
and moisture, weather and climate, and terrestrial processes of vegetative
biomes, soils, and landscape formation and change)


Table II: Earth/Space S
cience
s



Advanced Competencies

B. Advanced Competencies



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a摤楴楯渠no t桥h捯牥 捯m灥pe湣楥猬n
t敡捨敲s of t桥hEa牴栠h湤 s灡捥
s捩敮捥s as a 灲pma特 f楥汤⁳桯畬u 扥b
灲数p牥搠do 敦f散t楶敬e 汥l搠獴畤敮瑳d
to 畮摥牳瑡湤:




剥煵楲敤R䍯畲s敳

13.
Gradual and

catastrophic changes
in the Earth

GLY 220, Principles of Physical Geology

(integrated course in physical
geology covering the physical, chemical, and biological processes that combine
to produce geological processes; attention is focused on plate tectonic
s, earth
surface processes, and properties and formation of earth materials; laboratory
experiences emphasize identification and interpretation of geological materials
and maps)

14.
Oceans
and their

relationship to

changes in

atmosphere and climate

GEO 25
1, Weather and Climate
(survey of atmospheric controls associated
with local, regional, and global weather and climate variability; includes
fundamental coverage of physics and chemistry of energy, gases, pressure, and
moisture, with a goal of promoting u
nderstanding of general weather analysis
and forecasting, severe storms, atmospheric pollution, descriptive climatology,
and global climate change)
OR

GEO 130, Earth’s Physical Environment

(exploring the fundamental
characteristics of earth’s physical en
vironment; emphasis placed on identifying
interrelationships between atmospheric processes involving energy, pressure,
and moisture, weather and climate, and terrestrial processes of vegetative
biomes, soils, and landscape formation and change)

15.
Hydrol
ogical
cycles and

problems
of distribution and use of water


16.
Dating
of the

Earth and other
objects in the universe

GLY 220, Principles of Physical Geology

(integrated course in physical
geology covering the physical, chemical, and biological processes

that combine
to produce geological processes; attention is focused on plate tectonics, earth
surface processes, and properties and formation of earth materials; laboratory
experiences emphasize identification and interpretation of geological materials
and

maps)

AST 191, The Solar System
(emphasizing nature, origin, and evolution of
planets, satellites, and other objects in the solar system; topics also include
historical astronomy, the naked eye phenomenon of the sky and modern solar
system discoveries ma
de by spacecraft)

17.
Structures and interactions of
energy and matter in the universe

GLY 220, Principles of Physical Geology

(integrated course in physical
geology covering the physical, chemical, and biological processes that combine
to produce geolog
ical processes; attention is focused on plate tectonics, earth
surface processes, and properties and formation of earth materials; laboratory
experiences emphasize identification and interpretation of geological materials
and maps)

AST 191, The Solar Syste
m
(emphasizing nature, origin, and evolution of
planets, satellites, and other objects in the solar system; topics also include
historical astronomy, the naked eye phenomenon of the sky and modern solar
system discoveries made by spacecraft)

18.
Impact o
f c
hanges in the Earth
on

the evolution and distribution of living
things

GLY 401G, Invertebrate Paleobiology and Evolution (basic ecologic and
evolutionary framework of common fossil invertebrate taxa; major principles of
paleontology, ecology, systemati
cs and evolution; and the use of fossils in
paleoecology and biostratigraphy; laboratory work in classification of common

39

fossils)
OR

GLY 360, Mineralogy (study of mineral structure and composition, and
mineral classification through crystallographic and

crystal chemical technical;
laboratory work includes study of minerals via crystallographic, x
-
ray
diffraction, mineral chemical analysis and optical petrographic techniques)

19.
Issues
related to changes in Earth
systems
such as global climate change,
m
ine subsidence, and channeling of
waterways

GEO 251, Weather and Climate
(survey of atmospheric controls associated
with local, regional, and global weather and climate variability; includes
fundamental coverage of physics and chemistry of energy, gases,
pressure, and
moisture, with a goal of promoting understanding of general weather analysis
and forecasting, severe storms, atmospheric pollution, descriptive climatology,
and global climate change)
OR

GEO 130, Earth’s Physical Environment

(exploring the
fundamental
characteristics of earth’s physical environment; emphasis placed on identifying
interrelationships between atmospheric processes involving energy, pressure,
and moisture, weather and climate, and terrestrial processes of vegetative
biomes, soil
s, and landscape formation and change)

20.
Historical development and
perspectives

in the Earth and space
sciences
, including contributions of
significant figures and
underrepresented groups, and the
evolution of theories in the
se fields.

AST 191, The Sol
ar System
(emphasizing nature, origin, and evolution of
planets, satellites, and other objects in the solar system; topics also include
historical astronomy, the naked eye phenomenon of the sky and modern solar
system discoveries made by spacecraft)

GLY 2
20, Principles of Physical Geology

(integrated course in physical
geology covering the physical, chemical, and biological processes that combine
to produce geological processes; attention is focused on plate tectonics, earth
surface processes, and properti
es and formation of earth materials; laboratory
experiences emphasize identification and interpretation of geological materials
and maps)

21.
How to design, conduct, and report
research in the Earth and space
sciences

GLY 220, Principles of Physical Geolo
gy

(integrated course in physical
geology covering the physical, chemical, and biological processes that combine
to produce geological processes; attention is focused on plate tectonics, earth
surface processes, and properties and formation of earth materi
als; laboratory
experiences emphasize identification and interpretation of geological materials
and maps)

GLY 230, Fundamentals of Geology I
(field and laboratory methods for
identification and description of rocks and minerals with emphasis on
sedimentar
y rocks and rock forming minerals; field study of geologic
structures; interpretation of geologic maps)

GLY 235, Fundamentals of Geology II

(laboratory and field methods for
identification and description of rocks and minerals with emphasis on igneous
and

metamorphic rocks and rock forming minerals; field study of geologic
structures; interpretation of geologic maps)

22.
Applications

of the Earth and space
sciences and related technologies

in
society, business, industry, and health
fields



Table III: E
arth/Space Science



Supporting Competencies

C. Supporting Competencies



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s桯畬u 扥b灲数p牥搠do 敦f散tiv敬e
a灰汹 捯湣数ns f牯m ot桥爠sc楥湣敳i
a湤 mat桥mat楣s to t桥ht敡c桩hg of
Ea牴栠h湤 s灡捥 s捩c湣敳⁩湣汵l楮i

湣数ns of:




剥煵楲敤R䍯畲s敳

23.
Biology
,

including

evolution,
ecology, population dynamics, and
flow of energy and materials through
Earth systems

BIO 150, Principles of Biology I

(develop appreciation of biological principles
necessary to explore lif
e at the cellular and molecular level; similarities and
differences in structure and function of simple and complex cells covered along
with theories on the origin and evolution of biological systems)

BIO 151, Principles of Biology Laboratory I

(introduct
ory laboratory in which

40

biological systems are investigated at the cellular and molecular levels)

24.
Chemistry
, including broad
concepts and basic laboratory
techniques of

inorganic and organic
chemistry, physical chemistry, and
biochemistry

CHE 105, Ge
neral College Chemistry I

(basic atomic structure, bonding,
reactions, periodicity, thermodynamics, intermolecular forces, quantum theory,
hybridization, mass relationships in chemical reactions, gases)

CHE 107, General College Chemistry II

(kinetics, aci
d
-
base, thermodynamics,
electrochemistry, molecular geometry, hybridization, intermolecular forces,
physical properties of solutions, equilibrium)

CHE 115, General Chemistry Laboratory

(separations, synthesis,
measurements, mathematical applications, basic

laboratory skills, safety)

25.
Physics
,

including
electricity,
forces and motion, energy, magnetism,
thermodynamics, optics, and sound; as
well as basic quantum theory

PHY 211, General Physics

(survey of classical and modern physics focusing
on the moti
on of solids and fluids as governed by Newton’s laws and by the
conservation law of energy, momentum, and angular momentum)

PHY 213, General Physics

(electrostatics, dc circuits, magnetism, Maxwell’s
equations, electromagnetic radiation, light, and modern
physics)

26.
Mathematics, including statistics
and probability

MA 123, Elementary Calculus
(introduction to differential and integral
calculus with applications to business and biological and physical sciences)
or

MA 132, Calculus for Life Sciences

(int
roduction to integral calculus,
integration of logarithmic and exponential functions; application to life sciences
including biochemical rates, reactions, and radioactive decay; introduction to
biological models and their associated differential equations)

or

MA 113, Calculus I

(course in one variable calculus, including topics from
analytic geometry; derivatives and integrals of elementary functions


including
trigonometric functions


with applications)


41

NSTA S
cience Content Requirement
s

for Physics:

A
nalysis Tables I

(Core Competencies)
, II

(Advanced Competencies)
,
and
III

(Supporting Competencies)


Table I: Physics



Core Competencies

A. Core Competencies



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of 灨ys楣猠i桯畬搠扥d灲数p牥搠do 汥l搠
st畤敮es to 畮摥牳瑡湤 t桥hu湩晹楮i
捯湣数n
s 牥煵楲i搠df a汬⁴敡c桥牳f
s捩敮捥, a湤 s桯畬u 楮⁡d摩瑩o渠扥n
灲数p牥搠do 汥l搠獴畤敮瑳⁴o
畮摥牳瑡n携




剥煵楲敤R䍯畲s敳

1.
Energy, work, and power

PHY 231, General University Physics

(first part of two
-
semester survey of
classical physics; conseque
nces of the principles of mechanics are developed
conceptually, analytically, and quantitatively)

PHY 241, General University Physics Laboratory

(laboratory course
offering experiments in mechanics and heat, framed in a small group
environment that requir
es coordination and team work in the development of
a well written lab report)

2.
Motion, major forces, and
momentum

PHY 231, General University Physics

(first part of two
-
semester survey of
classical physics; consequences of the principles of mechanics
are developed
conceptually, analytically, and quantitatively)

PHY 241, General University Physics Laboratory

(laboratory course
offering experiments in mechanics and heat, framed in a small group
environment that requires coordination and team work in the

development of
a well written lab report)

3. Newtonian principles and laws
including
engineering applications

PHY 231, General University Physics

(first part of two
-
semester survey of
classical physics; consequences of the principles of mechanics are de
veloped
conceptually, analytically, and quantitatively)

PHY 241, General University Physics Laboratory

(laboratory course
offering experiments in mechanics and heat, framed in a small group
environment that requires coordination and team work in the devel
opment of
a well written lab report)

4.
Conservation mass, momentum,
energy, and charge

PHY 231, General University Physics

(first part of two
-
semester survey of
classical physics; consequences of the principles of mechanics are developed
conceptually, a
nalytically, and quantitatively)

PHY 241, General University Physics Laboratory

(laboratory course
offering experiments in mechanics and heat, framed in a small group
environment that requires coordination and team work in the development of
a well writte
n lab report)

5.
Physical properties of matter

PHY 232, General University Physics

(a general course covering electricity,
magnetism, electromagnetic waves and physical optics)

PHY 242, General University Physics Laboratory

(laboratory course
offering e
xperiments in electricity, magnetism, and light, framed in a small
group environment that requires coordination and team work in the
development of a well written lab report)

6.
Kinetic
-
molecular motion and
atomic models

PHY 361, Modern Physics

(elements

of symmetry and special relative,
notions of time and special relativity, Doppler effect and expanding universe,
space
-
time and twin paradox, unification of electricity and magnetism,
energy and momentum in special relativity, what is mass?, blackbody
rad
iation, photoelectric effect, nature of light, Compton effect and pair
production, De Broglie waves, interference of traveling matter waves, nature
of standing matter waves, uncertainty principle, atoms scattering in the
classical atom, atom light and thee

quantum atom, atomic spectra, invention
of lasers, wave functions and wave equations, Schroedinger’s equation,
quantum operators, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, harmonic oscillator,
electron probability density, electron spin, nuclear properties, liquid dr
op
model, nuclear shell model, classification of forces and particles, symmetry
principles and conservation laws, standard model and physics beyond)


42

7.
Radioactivity, nuclear reactors,
fission, and fusion

PHY 361, Modern Physics

(elements of symmetr
y and special relative,
notions of time and special relativity, Doppler effect and expanding universe,
space
-
time and twin paradox, unification of electricity and magnetism,
energy and momentum in special relativity, what is mass?, blackbody
radiation, pho
toelectric effect, nature of light, Compton effect and pair
production, De Broglie waves, interference of traveling matter waves, nature
of standing matter waves, uncertainty principle, atoms scattering in the
classical atom, atom light and thee quantum at
om, atomic spectra, invention
of lasers, wave functions and wave equations, Schroedinger’s equation,
quantum operators, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, harmonic oscillator,
electron probability density, electron spin, nuclear properties, liquid drop
model, n
uclear shell model, classification of forces and particles, symmetry
principles and conservation laws, standard model and physics beyond)

8.
Wave theory, sound, light, the
electromagnetic spectrum and optics

PHY 361, Modern Physics

(elements of symme
try and special relative,
notions of time and special relativity, Doppler effect and expanding universe,
space
-
time and twin paradox, unification of electricity and magnetism,
energy and momentum in special relativity, what is mass?, blackbody
radiation, p
hotoelectric effect, nature of light, Compton effect and pair
production, De Broglie waves, interference of traveling matter waves, nature
of standing matter waves, uncertainty principle, atoms scattering in the
classical atom, atom light and thee quantum
atom, atomic spectra, invention
of lasers, wave functions and wave equations, Schroedinger’s equation,
quantum operators, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, harmonic oscillator,
electron probability density, electron spin, nuclear properties, liquid drop
model,

nuclear shell model, classification of forces and particles, symmetry
principles and conservation laws, standard model and physics beyond)

9.
Electricity and magnetism

PHY 231, General University Physics

(first part of two
-
semester survey of
classic
al physics; consequences of the principles of mechanics are developed
conceptually, analytically, and quantitatively)

PHY 241, General University Physics Laboratory

(laboratory course
offering experiments in mechanics and heat, framed in a small group
env
ironment that requires coordination and team work in the development of
a well written lab report)

PHY 232, General University Physics

(a general course covering electricity,
magnetism, electromagnetic waves and physical optics)

PHY 242, General Universit
y Physics Laboratory

(laboratory course
offering experiments in electricity, magnetism, and light, framed in a small
group environment that requires coordination and team work in the
development of a well written lab report)

10.
Fundamental processes of
investigating in physics

PHY 241, General University Physics Laboratory

(laboratory course
offering experiments in mechanics and heat, framed in a small group
environment that requires coordination and team work in the development of
a well written lab re
port)

PHY 242, General University Physics Laboratory

(laboratory course
offering experiments in electricity, magnetism, and light, framed in a small
group environment that requires coordination and team work in the
development of a well written lab report
)

11.
Applications of physics in
environmental quality and to personal
and community health



Table II: Physics



Advanced Competencies

B. Advanced Competencies



I渠
a摤楴楯渠no t桥h捯牥 捯m灥pe湣楥猬n
t敡捨敲s of 灨ys楣猠is a 灲p浡特 f楥汤i
s桯畬u 扥b灲p
灡牥搠do 敦f散tiv敬e
汥l搠獴畤敮瑳⁴o 畮摥牳瑡湤:



剥煵楲敤R䍯畲s敳

12.
Thermodynamics and

relationships
PHY 361, Modern Physics

(elements of symmetry and special relative,

43

between

energy

and
matter

notions of time and special relativity, Doppler effec
t and expanding universe,
space
-
time and twin paradox, unification of electricity and magnetism,
energy and momentum in special relativity, what is mass?, blackbody
radiation, photoelectric effect, nature of light, Compton effect and pair
production, De Br
oglie waves, interference of traveling matter waves, nature
of standing matter waves, uncertainty principle, atoms scattering in the
classical atom, atom light and thee quantum atom, atomic spectra, invention
of lasers, wave functions and wave equations, S
chroedinger’s equation,
quantum operators, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, harmonic oscillator,
electron probability density, electron spin, nuclear properties, liquid drop
model, nuclear shell model, classification of forces and particles, symmetry
principl
es and conservation laws, standard model and physics beyond)

13.
Nuclear physics including matter
-
energy duality and reactivity

PHY 361, Modern Physics

(elements of symmetry and special relative,
notions of time and special relativity, Doppler effect

and expanding universe,
space
-
time and twin paradox, unification of electricity and magnetism,
energy and momentum in special relativity, what is mass?, blackbody
radiation, photoelectric effect, nature of light, Compton effect and pair
production, De Bro
glie waves, interference of traveling matter waves, nature
of standing matter waves, uncertainty principle, atoms scattering in the
classical atom, atom light and thee quantum atom, atomic spectra, invention
of lasers, wave functions and wave equations, Sc
hroedinger’s equation,
quantum operators, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, harmonic oscillator,