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European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

1


Country profiles

Contents

Austria

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3

Belgium

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5

Bulgaria

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Croatia

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8

Cypr
us

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Czech Republic

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12

Denmark

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14

Estonia

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16

Finland

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18

France
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21

Germany

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Greece

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Hungary

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Iceland

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29

It
aly

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31

Lithuania

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34

Luxembourg

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Malta

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Norway

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Po
land

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Portugal

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43

Republic of Ireland

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45

Slovenia

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47

Spain

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49

Sweden

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Switzerland

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54

The Netherlands

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United Kingdom

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58

England
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58

Northern Ireland

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60

European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
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Scotland

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61

Wales
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63


No responses were submitted by Latvia and Slovakia




European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
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Austria

Reporter(s)

Alejandro Bachmann, Head of Education at the Austrian Film Museum.

Gerhardt Ordnung, Chairman of filmABC


Institut für angewandte
Medienbildung und
Filmvermittlung (Institute for applied media literacy and
film education)

Researcher:

Caren Willig


Overview

Population

8404252





Number of school age children


0
-
14 years:
14.7%

15
-
24 years:
12.1%

Film education is part of media education, so there is no specific film education strategy. As the
Austrian Federal Ministry for Education, Arts and Culture offers a ‘basic direction for media
education’ that should be taken into consideration across all s
chool types and subjects, a kind of
media education strategy exists, but it is non
-
committal. There are regional and local media centres
that provide materials for film education (film equipment and DVDs) and offer workshops, but the
reporters don’t see a
basic strategy of film education behind this. There are campaigning
organisations for film education, such as filmABC and the Austrian Film Museum, that continuously
provide film education for pupils and young people with a self
-
defined strategy behind (mo
stly
external like in cinemas and not in class


and not in direct connection with curricula but as a
common offer for teachers and pupils).


Formal education

The
general curriculum is decided by the national government.

Film education
is no separate sub
ject, but
forms an optional part of Media education at all school
levels, and is also included in other subjects in middle and high school level. Due to the Austrian
Federal Ministry for Education, Arts and Culture’s „basic direction for media education“ a
ll teachers
in all subjects shall work with media (and film)


„in accordance to their opportunities and
resources“ and as part of cultural education. But this is optional, so most teachers work with film in
German classes, arts class or foreign language c
lasses. Film education is seen to promote critical and
wider viewing, understanding of film as an art form and text, study and understanding of different
film forms or genres, development of textual analysis, and film language and filmmaking skills.


There

are national guidelines on teaching film education, and single initiatives and organisations
provide film education resources and materials with support from the Austrian Federal Ministry for
Education, Arts and Culture. Film is tested when it is part of
media education, but results in media
education have no influence on the successful graduation of a school year because it is an optional
subject. As far as the reporter is aware of, no national records of children’s achievements are
collected. The lack o
f teacher training and framework, the fact that film education doesn't appear in
curricula and that even media education is only optional, the low status of film education, and the
lack of sustained funding, are all seen as barriers to the provision of fil
m education. For after
-
school
education, there are local programmes and projects, such as ‘One World Filmclub’, that help
students to set up film clubs at school, plus some individual initiatives by students or teachers.


A best guess suggests that
5%
of
all school age children participate in film education activities within
formal education structures
.


Informal education

There is a
framework and infra
structure in place to support informal film education on a regional
level
,
Informal education by adult
education centres, film education only selectively and then mainly
by regional and local media centres that provide
material (film equipment and DVD
s) and also offer
European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
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workshops.

Film education is nationally, regionally and locally a part of media education
and locally
also included in other subjects, for example part

of the program of small cinemas or film clubs that
accompany film screenings with lectures, film talks etc. The aims of film as a subject of study are
seen to be: wider viewing; filmmaking; enjoyment; social and civic education; understanding of film
as a
n art form; access to and understanding of national film heritage and European cinema; study
and understanding of different film forms or genres; development of film language and filmmaking
skills.

All sorts of organisations provide film education:
adult c
olleges, film societies, galleries and
museums, film archive centres, and community spaces.

T
he national and regional funding for informal film education varies. Institutions that provide public
funding have to publish their annual expenditure.

The repor
ter does not know if records are kept as to expenditure or young people’s achievements in
瑨攠晩敬搮



Audio visual sector

The film industry funds cinema screenings, ticket discount programmes and learning resources for
schools, but not other audiences.

Broadcasters tend not to provide support, but there are some film
education related programs on certain cable channels, such as, "Okto. Community TV".

There are no records learners’ achievements.


Cultural bodies

Film is promoted by national and region
al film agencies

(eg the Austrian Film Commission
-
www.afc.at)
, by national cultural agencies (eg
KulturKontakt Austria
-

www.kulturkontakt.or.at), and
by selective cultural commissions of the regions.

The funding for these comes from the national and
regi
onal governments, such as the
Austrian Federal Ministry for Education, Arts and Culture
(Bundesministerium für Unterricht, Kunst und Kultur
-

www.bmukk.gv.at), and the Federal Ministry
of Economy, Family and Youth (Bundesministerium für Wirtschaft, Familie

und Jugend
-

www.bmwfj.gv.at
).

In Austria, there are no official agencies that support film education, but to some extent
KulturKontakt Austria (
www.kulturkontakt.or.at
), filmABC or the Austrian Film Museum get some
funding for their work with film from t
he Austrian Federal Ministry for Education, Arts and Culture.

In terms of film heritage,
there is the Austrian Film Archive and the Austrian Film Museum, but they
are not national film archives/museums. Both these institutions offer film education, but th
eir
definition might differ in terms of theoretical background and practical realisation.
Films may also be
part of some museum or archive collections. The funding comes from the government, charities, or
commercial sponsors.

Specific film festivals are or
ganised nationally for a variety of audiences: for children under 12 and
for young people from 13


21, for specific groups and genres/types of film. There are also regional
film festivals for young people 13
-

21. Some festival websites:
www.kinderfilmfes
tival.at
;
www.youki.at; www.klappe.at; www.gaffa
-
filmfestival.at; www.identities.at; www.trickywomen.at;
www.viennashorts.com
;
www.diagonale.at
; www.crossingeurope.at.

Film festivals are funded by
national, regional governments


where film education provi
sion is a requirement of the funding,
and also local governments, charities, commercial sponsorship and ticket sales.

The reporter does not know if national or regional agencies try to evaluate film educational
programmes.


Professional development

There is a national programme of film literacy training for in
-
service teachers, professional
filmmakers who work as freelance educators, youth and community workers, and cinema, gallery
and festival staff. Professional programmes offer accreditation for i
nitial teacher training, diplomas
for short courses and Master levels, but there are

no bursary schemes for the training.

European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
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5


Belgium

Reporter(s)

Harveng Gérard
-

project leader,
Conseil supérieur de l'Education aux médias
(Higher Council for Media Education
),
Belgium (Brussels
-

Wallonia Federation)

Elise Van Beurden


co
-
ordination educational departement, Jekino Education and
Distribution, Belgium


Researcher:

Caren Willig


Overview

Population




10951266

Number of school age children


0
-
14 years:
16.9
%

15
-
24 years:
12.1
%

There is no real national film education strategy in Belgium because all cultural and educational
matters depend on Communities' and Regions' political powers.


Formal education

In Belgium, educational matters depend on political powers of
the
Brussels
-
Wallonia Federation
(
for
t
he French
-
speaking part of the c
ountry
)

and
the
Dutch
-
speaking Regional Government
(
for the
Flemish
-
speaking part of the country
)
. Curriculums are decided
by the Minister in charge of
education of each government, but also by educational networks to which the schools belong
to
(schools can be
also
ruled directly by the Minister of Education, by the provincial, local, municipal
authorities or by independent c
atholic affiliated boards).

Film education is a core separate subject (
because it follows specific media educational aims)
,

and
is
also included in other subjects at all school levels.

The aims of film education are to promote:
critical
and wider viewing;
enjoyment; social and civic education; personal/individual development;
understanding of film as an art form and as a text; access to and understanding of national film
heritage, European cinema, world cinema, popular national or international cinema (eg H
ollywood
or Bollywood); understanding of different film forms or genres; development of textual analysis skills
and of film language and filmmaking skills.

There are regional guidelines and approved resources
in relation to pedagogical approaches and
conte
nt. If film is tested depends on the teacher, on the taught matter, and on the level.

In some regions, statistical records are collected. In Wallonia, each film education provider measures
children's and young people's achievements and the regional statist
ical records are based on this
data.

In the whole of Belgium, the barriers to nation
-
wide provision of film education are a lack of teacher
training, sustained funding, leadership, and a lack of frameworks and guidelines. In Brussels
-
Wallonia Federation, f
ilm teaching is not considered as a core part in curriculums, but initiatives exist
and there are funds. There is
great

will
ingness

to ensure and develop film education through existing
initiat
ives and projects. After school
education programmes are run
locally.

The best guess of the percentage of all school age children who regularly take part in film education
in school is between 50 and 60%.


Informal education

Within the

informal film education

infrastructure in Belgium,

museums, film s
ocieties and
archive
centres, as well as

communities provide film education.

In the Brussels
-
Wallonia Federation
,

film festivals also educate in film, and lifelong learning
strategies are provided by organisations specialised in film education, or cultural centres tha
t include
film education in their cultural politics.

Film education
(
in the Brussels
-
Wallonia Federation
)

is
regionally and locally a part of
a part of media education, a

separate subject, as well as included in
other subjects, such as
citizenship, fightin
g discrimination, multicultural values, equal opportunities.
In Flanders it is a separate subject (locally).

European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
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The aims of film education are to promote:
critical and wider viewing; enjoyment; social and civic
education; personal/individual development; unde
rstanding of film as an art form and as a text;
access to and understanding of national film heritage, European cinema, world cinema, popular
national or international cinema (eg Hollywood or Bollywood); understanding of different film forms
or genres; dev
elopment of textual analysis skills and of film language and filmmaking skills.

Film education activities in the Brussels
-
Wallonia Federation are funded year on year by the
government or the region, and there is
also regional funding for short
-
term project
s.

There is neither
data on expenditure nor recorded achievements of these projects.


Audio visual sector

Apart from some
isolated initiatives where the film industry forges short
-
term partnerships with
officially approved organisations,
neither
the film

industry nor broadcasters seem to subsidise film
education or provide any training.


Cultural bodies

Film is promoted by national and regional film agencies, as well as regional cultural agencies which
include film
-

such as
La Cinémathèque R
oyale (Royal Film Institute of Belgium); la Cinémathèque de
la Fédération Wallonie Bruxelles (Brussels
-
Wallonia Federati
on Film Institute); le Service G
énéral de
l'Audiovisuel et des Multimédias (General Department for audiovisual Matters and Multimedia of

Brussels
-
Wallonia Federation); Bozart; Flagey; la Médiathèque (Media Library of Brussels
-

Wallonia
Federation). T
he funding for these comes from the national and regional governments.

Agencies promote film education online and via cinema programming to s
chools, colleges and
universities
,
children
, y
oung people

and families, l
ocal communities

and c
inephiles.
The Higher
Council for Media Education is in charge of general coordination of all providers' initiatives in formal
and informal education.

In terms o
f film heritage,
there is
a national film archive
,

regional and specialist film archives
, and

a
national film museum
.
Films may also be part of some museum or archive collections.
The national
film archive/museum provides film education, and the Brussels
-
W
allonia Federation Film Institute
offers some film education.

Specific film festivals are organised nationally for a variety of audiences: for children and young
people, with a separate section specifically for children and young people, for local communi
ties,
specific groups, and specific genres/types of film. There are also regional film festivals

for young
people 13
-

21. Festival
websites:

www.fifa
-
mons.be; www.fiff.be; www.festivalfantastique.org;
www.brff.be; www.animatv.be; www.fatp.be; www.courtmet
rage.be; www.festival5sur5.be;
www.media10
-
10.be; www.centremultimedia.org/fifi/; www.cinepoket.be; www.befestival.be;
www.festivalsdeslibertes.be.

There are also
festivals for local communities.

Film festivals are funded
by regional and local governments, commercial sponsorship and ticket sales.

There are no attempts to evaluate film educational programmes.


Professional development

There is a national training programme for in
-
service teache
rs already working in schools that the
teachers can attend, but they're not required to. For future teachers, some higher education
establishments provide film education and organize training programmes but these are isolated
initiatives. There are no prof
essional development programmes that offer any certification.






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cy Survey 2012
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Bulgaria

Reporter(s)

Antonia Kovacheva, film critic, International Relations at the Bulgarian National
Film Archive on the staff; President of the Bulgarian Film Critics Guild with the
Union of Bulgarian Film Makers

-

Bulgarian National Film Archive and Union of Bulgarian Film Makers

Researcher:

Caren Willig


Overview

Population

7504868


Percentage of school age children:


0
-
14 years
:
13
.8%

15
-
24 years
:
11.9
%

There is no

national film education strategy or policy

in Bulgaria
.


Formal education



Informal education



Audio visual sector



Cultural bodies




Professional development





European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
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Croatia

Reporter(s)

Ivana
Jakobović
Alpeza
,

Head of educational film programme at the not
-
for profit organisation "Kids meet Art"

Researcher:

Caren Willig


Overview

Populatio
n


4412137


Number of school age children


0
-
14 years:
15.1
%

15
-
24 years:
12.0
%

The Ministry of Science, Education and
Sport of the Republic of Croatia
,

and also the Croatian
audiovisual Centre (HAVC) have a national film education strategy.

Different film associations and groups

in Croatia

are
also
campaigning for film education.


Formal education

The government decides

the national curriculum in Croatia. Film is studied at all levels as part of
other subjects.

Film education is part of media education (film, TV, theatre, computer, media) within
the subject "Croatian language and literature". 20 hours of media education

per year are taught
from 1
st

to 8
th

grade, depending on the teachers’ aspirations, including approximately 10 hours of
film education. Personal and individual development, the understanding of film as an art form,
access to national film heritage, and stu
dy and understanding of different film forms or genres are
the aims of film education. There are national guidelines for primary school children and middle
school children. But there are no guidelines on pedagogical approaches, and no resources

e.g. no
se
parate textbook on film education.

Where film is studied (in primary and high school within the curriculum), it is tested, and pupils are
marked for their knowledge. There are no systematic statistical records of children's and young
people's s achievement
s in film education, but the Faculty of Teachers Education and Croatian Film
Association are sporadically collecting results of children's achievements in film education.


The lack of teacher training, low status of film education, lack of sustained fundin
g, lack of resources,
lack of guidelines, lack of leadership, lack of framework, are all listed as barriers to progressing film
education.

Children’s filmmaking is developed in Croatia on a local and regional level, but film fun
clubs or organisations that

provide activities such as screening films or film debates and lectures, do
not exist.

The number of all school age children who regularly take part in film education in primary and
middle school is 349 423 (data school year 2010/2011).

The best guess of
High school children who
get to study film education is 192 000.


Informal education

An informal regional film education infrastructure exists in Croatia where
film education is offered
by different film associations and societies, kino
/cinema clubs or Art
-
cinema educational programs,
community spaces or informal education centres. Film education is regionally and locally a part of
media education. The aims of film as a subject of study are: film making; enjoyment; personal and
individua
l development; audience development and choice; access to national, European, and world
cinema film heritage; and the development of film language and filmmaking skills.

Funding sources are the national government and
charity or philanthropy funding for y
ear on year
projects, the regions for short
-
term film education projects, and also
commercial sponsorship, local
government, or membership for other projects.

The Croatian audio visual centre publishes data on annual expenditure on informal film education
every year. There are no records of learner’s achievements or benefits.


Audio visual sector

European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
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The Croatian film industry funds cinema screenings and ticket discount programmes for schools; film
clubs and festival education programs for schools and young p
eople; and film clubs and study days
for adult learners. There is nothing though for children and families.

Broadcasters enable screenings from film archives for all ages, and screenings of European and
world cinema for high school and adult learners. The
y do not provide training in film education.


Cultural bodies

The national film agency responsible for promoting film is the Croatian audiovisual centre (HAVC)
and is funded by the Ministry of Culture and contributions of all those using audiovisual work
s (such
as broadcasters, digital, cable and satellite operators, Internet providers, telecoms, etc). HAVC also
supports networks of education providers for the formal and informal sector.

The film industry subsidises cinema programmes for schools, young pe
ople and cinephiles; learning
resources for Universities and cinephiles; and the HAVC is funding different associations that are
active in some areas of film education.

In terms of film heritage, there is
a national film museum and films may be also part
of other
museum or archive collections, but these don’t offer film education.

There is a local festival that is aimed at children under 12, some national, regional and local film
festivals show specific genres/types of film and have a separate section for
children under 12, and
one for young people (only at local level).

The following URLS are festivals with showing films for children (not made by children):
www.animafest.hr; www.jff
-
zagreb.hr; www.zagrebfilmfestival.com;
www.pulafilmfestival.hr
;
www.vukov
arfilmfestival.com; www.sff.ba;
www.taborfilmfestival.com
;
www.festivalopravimadjece.org; www.zagrebdox.net.

Festivals are funded by national, regional and local governments, charity and commercial
sponsorship, and tickets sales.




Professional development

There is a national training programme for education professionals in film literacy for teachers
before they begin teaching, for in
-
service teachers already working in schools, and university
education for teachers and professors.

There is also the optional education programme "Škola
medijske kulture dr. Ante Peterlić" for in
-
service teachers.

Initial teacher training, Master’s programmes, and short courses also all offer some form of
accreditation or certification, but there are n
o bursary schemes or other forms of funding for these.






European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
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10


Cyprus

Reporter(s)

Berangere Blondeau, International Children's Film
Festival of Cyprus : ICFFCY

Researcher:

Michelle Cannon


Overview

Population

804,435

Number of school age children


0
-
14 years: 16.9% (2010)

15
-
24 years: 14.9% (2010)

There is no

national or regional film education strateg
y in Cyprus. T
he
International Children's Film
Festival is regarded as one of the main campaigning agents for film education.


Formal education

The national curriculum is decided by government, whereas private schools can use their own
curricula, often following those of the UK, USA or France. There are both core and optional film
education components within the subject of media education and in v
arious other subjects in the
curriculum, as well as being studied as a separate subject.


Enjoyment, understanding of film as a text and as a part of national film heritage are recorded as the
main aims of film education activities.
There are no national
or regional guidelines, nor any records
kept of achievements
but there are
national approved teaching resources.
The
International
Children’s Film Festival

(ICFFCY) along with the
Cyprus Community Media Centre

and European
funded projects offer educational after school activities.


There are a number of challenges to progressing film education in Cyprus:
lack of teacher training;
low status of film education; lack of

sustained funding; lack of resources; lack of guidelines; lack of
leadership and a lack of framework.


Informal education

Cyprus appears to have an informal education infrastructure and within that at local level, film
education is offered as part of m
edia education and as a separate subject, as well as being included
in other subject areas. Informal film education activities promote a wide variety of outcomes: from
personal development and enjoyment to critical and wider viewing, from film making and s
ocial and
civic education to all aspects of film as an important representation of national, European and world
art and cinema heritage. These activities are provided by
adult colleges, film societies and
community spaces and enjoy year on year national go
vernment funding.


Audio visual sector

The film industry and broadcasters are not active in film education.


Cultural bodies

The promotion of film is part of the remit of the national cultural agency which is engaged in the
organisation of the Internati
onal Children’s Film Festival and funded by national government. The
agency creates cinema programming and other activities specifically for schools, colleges,
universities, local communities and cinephiles. It also supports film education networks in the
informal sector. Cinema heritage in Cyprus does not appear to be represented other than through
the annual festival.


Funded by national government, commercial sponsors and ticket sales, film festivals are organised
specifically for children under

12 and for young people as well as for particular groups and genres of
film. No attempts are made to evaluate the impact of film education initiatives organised by the
European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
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11


cultural agency.


Professional development

Cinema, gallery and festival staff with an

interest in film education are offered training in film
education and diplomas for short courses are available.



European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
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12


Czech Republi
c

Reporter:
Pavel Bednarik, independent film
professional, National Film Archive (Narodni
filmovy archiv) Prague

Researcher:
Caren Willig

Additional comments and endorsement:
Petr
Platenik, independent educator and journalist


Overview

Population

10,532,770

Percentage of school age children:


0
-
14 years: 14.4%

15
-
24 years: 12.1%

There is no national film education strategy yet, but in January 2012 an expert group was set up by
the Ministry of Culture to develop a strategy in 2012. The only previous document briefly
mentioning the importance of film education and of a national film

strategy, was the Conception of
Cinematography of the Czech Republic 2010
-
2016 (agreed by the Parliament in 2010).


Formal education

The national government decides the country’s curriculum. The curriculum



based on ‘Framework
Educational Programmes’


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卥SonT慲Š

l敶敬Ⱐ
楴⁳異po牴r瑨敲⁳畢橥捴c⁡nT⁳ 捩慬⁡湤 捩c楬
敤e捡瑩cn
⸠周敲T⁡牥 Vome n慴楯n慬⁧u楤敬楮敳eon m敤楡⁥摵捡瑩o
n⁴U慴⁩湣 uT攠晩fm⁥Tu捡瑩Wn⸠䙩lm
楳i琠獴畤楥i o爠r硡m楮敤e慳⁡Š獥灡牡瑥 獵V橥j琬⁢ 琠
U楳瑯ry o映晩fm⁩猠p慲Šf⁴U攠捵c物捵汵m⁩渠
U楳瑯特f楴敲 瑵牥⁩W 瑨攠W楮慬⁥ŠŠm猠慴⁨楧U⁳ Uoo氮

No⁲ co牤猠o映f捨c敶em敮e猠楮⁦楬m 敤e捡瑩on⁡牥⁣o汬e捴cT⸠
䥮f
orm慬Š慦瑥Š
-
IouW
-
of⁳ Uoo氠
p牯g牡rme猠慲V晦敲敤⁢y慴 on慬Ⱐ牥杩on慬⁡ŠToc慬⁣畬瑵牡氠慮T⁶o汵n瑡Wy org慮楳慴楯n猠慮V⁢y
獯m攠V捨co汳l


䅮⁥獴Vm慴ŠT 40┠o映f捨co氠捨l汤牥渠牥r敩e攠Vom攠form o映晩fm⁥Tu捡瑩Wn ⡩映on攠楮捬cT敳e獣牥敮eng猠
o映fTu捡瑩Wn慬

晩fmV


o瑨W牷楳攠i琠楳⁰iob慢汹llow敲⤮


䥮景牭慬⁥Tu捡瑩on

周敲攠楳  瑩Wn慬⁩Š晲慳W牵捴畲攠co⁳異po牴r楮fo牭Š氠敤l捡瑩on⸠䥮景rm慬⁦楬m⁥Tu捡瑩cn⁩猠
p牯v楤敤⁢y⁩湤数敮e敮e牧慮楳慴楯n猠


晵nT敤⁹敡爠on⁹敡爠批⁴U攠gov敲em敮eⰠHU攠MNM䥁
p牯g牡rme
Ⱐ慮H⁴Ue⁅u牯p敡渠卯捩慬⁆ nT


睨o o牧Šn楳攠晩汭⁳ 牥敮eng猠慮V⁥Tu捡瑩cn m慴敲楡e献V
佮⁡⁲敧Oon慬Šv敬e⁴U敲e⁡牥r晩fm⁳潣 整i敳ⰠV瑵W敮琠晩em⁣汵b猬V慮T⁳潭 ⁦楬 ⁣汵b猠景爠捨r汤r敮⁡湤
young⁰ op汥⸠䙩lm⁥Tu捡瑩on⁩猠mo獴汹⁰牯v楤敤⁡e⁰ 牴rof敤e愠
敤e捡瑩WnⰠ瑯⁳uppo牴ro瑨敲⁦W敬e猠
o映楮瑥r敳eH⁴o⁰牯moW攠捲楴c捡氠ci敷楮g⁡湤⁦楬m m慫楮g⸠周敲攠楳 ⁲散o牤 o映桯眠mu捨⁦cnT楮g
楮景牭慬⁦楬 ⁥Tu捡瑩on⁧ W猠慮V ⁡瑴emp琠瑯敡獵牥r慣Š楥vem敮琮


䅵T楯⁶楳i慬Š獥VWo爠

周攠晩fm⁩湤u獴特⁦畮T猠獵VU⁡捴
楶i瑩敳WŠV

獣V敥n楮g猠Vo爠獣桯o汳Ⱐl敳eiv慬⁥摵捡瑩Wn⁰牯g牡rm敳Ⱐ慮T
獯m攠T楳i物ru瑯牳⁦畮T⁥Tu捡瑩cn慬Š捡cpV⁦ r⁹oung⁦ 汭m慫敲献⁔U敲攠慲Š⁡汳o⁴i捫cW⁤楳捯unW
p牯g牡rme猬⁦楬m⁣ou牳敳Ⱐ慮T⁳灥捩慬⁳捲敥n楮g猠Vi瑨⁩湴牯Tu捴con猠批⁩湶楴敤⁳e敡步牳r


B
牯慤捡c瑥牳⁨敬e⁤敶敬ep 晩fm楴敲慣e⁢礠慩Š楮g⁡ 捨cv攬e䕵Nop敡e⁡湤⁗o牬r⁃ n敭愠晩Šm猬⁡湤⁴U攠
second public service channel shows film classics in the context of ‘film clubs’. These programmes
慲攠Šnly⁡ m敤⁡琠o汤敲eyou瑨⁡WT⁡摵汴猬⁴U敲攠楳oWU楮g

景爠捨r汤牥測⁡r慲琠晲om
愠捯up汥f
European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

13


franchise TV channels for children, but only on pay cable TV and weekend programmes for children,
but these are not educational platforms
.

Czech public service television (Channel 2) commissioned a film literacy serie
s, but after the
appointment of a new director and internal staff

changes, the project stopped. Since
t
here has been

no long term conception of
film
edu
cation by public service television
.


Cultural bodies

There are several cultural agencies whose remit includes film. The national ones
-

funded by the
government and the Ministry of Culture
-

are the
Czech Film Center and the Czech Film Commission,
but they subsidise and promote the Czech film industry, but n
ot film education

(generally there is a
lack of financial support from the governmental institutions to develop film education due to a lack
of a concept of film education on the government level)
. Their support for informal film education
providers is lim
ited to
advertising their activities in bulletins and websites.

The regional film agencies programme screenings for schools and young people, offer online
resources for young people, and run other activities for local communities. Their grants come from
th
e Ministry of Culture, the MEDIA programme, the Visegrad fund (partly), and European Social
Funds (Education for Competitiveness Programme).


Film heritage is preserved by

a national film archive (government funded), by commercially funded
specialist film
archives, and by other government
-
funded museums or archive collections.


The Czech Republic is unique in the number of film festivals they offer (because of the lack of a
strategy of the national body to support of the festivals according to priorities).

About 11 festivals,
all funded in different ways, are aimed at children, young people, local communities, and special
interest groups. Film education provision is not a requirement for funding.


There are some attempts to measure and record learners’ achi
evem敮瑳Won⁡ nŠ瑩Wn慬Šv敬e⁢ 琠
瑨敳W⁡ 攠no琠b慳敤n⁡湹⁳ 牡r敧礠慮T⁨ v攠Š⁶敲e業楴敤⁩ p慣琮


P牯f敳獩on慬⁤ev敬opm敮琠

周敲攠楳 ⁵ iv敲獩ey⁳畢je捴cprog牡rm攠楮⁦o爠r敡捨敲猠o映晩fm⁥Tu捡瑩onⰠ扵W⁴U敲e

楳i瑲慩W楮gn
o晦敲⁦o爠楮
-
V敲e楣攠W敡e
U敲猠慮V⁡捡摥m楣猬⁢ 琠瑨慴⁣on獩獴猠on汹f⁡ 晥眠獨o牴r捯u牳敳r⁰牯j散eV
牥慣桩ng⁡ 汩m楴敤imb敲eo映f敡捨敲献e周敲T⁡牥⁍楮i獴特 o映捵f瑵牥⁰Wo橥j琠g牡r瑳W景r⁴U敳攠⡮o
bu牳慲礠獣桥m敳e⸠周攠p牯j散e猠捯n瑩Wue⁡猠慣捲敤cW敤⁰eog牡mm敳efo爠摩獴慮捥c敤
u捡瑩cn on汹⁡
瑨攠晩Wm⁳ uT楥i⁤数 牴m敮琠楮⁏lomou挠⡐慬Š捫c⁕湩v敲獩瑹⤮⁔U敲攠慲Š⁳桯r琠cou牳敳r瑨W琠o晦敲e
T楰汯m慳Š







European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

14


Denmark

Reporter:
Ulrik Krapper, CEO, Station Next

Researcher: Caren Willig

Endorsement:
Martin Brandt Pedersen
, Danish
Film
Institut


Overview

Population

5,560,628


Number of school age children


0
-
14 years: 17.9%

15
-
24 years: 12.5%

There is no government film education strategy, but the Danish Film Institute (DFI


M整 M慮獫攠
䙩汭楮獴楴畴V⁨慶攠瑨敩Wwn⁳ 牡瑥ry⁴慲Š整楮g
n慴Šon慬⁦楬m 敤e捡瑩on慬u瑲敡WU⁰牯g牡r猠楮V
捯汬慢or慴楯n⁷楴i 獥v敲慬⁲敧eon慬⁰慲瑮e牳Ⱐr敡捨楮g ou琠慣Šo獳⁴U攠捯un瑲y⸠周ey晦敲eon汩n攠晩fm
T楳瑲楢u瑩WnⰠ獣Uoo氠獣l敥ning猬⁴敡捨楮g m慴敲楡e猬⁴敡捨敲⁴牡楮楮g⁡湤⁡ 牡rg攠o映f瑨W爠慣riv楴i敳eWo

慢汥⁣U楬T牥渠慮T young p敯p汥l瑯⁦楮TⰠ畮T敲獴慮T 慮T⁣牥慴r⁦楬 献V

却慴楯n⁎ 硴 瑲楥猠f牯m 瑩W攠Wo⁴ime⁴o⁲慩獥⁴U攠qu敳e楯nf⁡ gov敲湭敮琠e瑲慴Šgy
fo爠rUe
educational ‘food chain’).


䙯牭慬⁥Tu捡瑩on

䥮⁴U攠n慴Šon慬⁣畲物捵汵m o映M敮m慲欬⁦楬m⁩
獴畤楥i 慳⁰慲琠o映m敤e愠敤e捡瑩onH⁡湤瑨W爠
獵V橥j瑳Ⱐ瑯⁰牯mo瑥 捲楴楣c氠慮T⁷楤敲ev楥睩湧
H

晩fm慫楮g
Ⱐ慮H
p敲eon慬⽩湤楶楤u慬⁤敶敬opm敮琠
慣牯獳⁡汬⁡ 攠牡rg敳Ⱐ慳⁷e汬⁡猠Wo⁰牯v楤e⁥n橯ym敮e

(楮瑥牥獴楮g汹⁦ r‵
-
15n汹⤮

䥮⁨楧U⁳ Uool
汥v敬⁂⤠M
eT楡⁡iT⁆楬m⁩猠慮p瑩on慬Š獵V橥j琬WW慫楮g⁵ ‸┠⡬敶敬⁂ ⁡湤″┠⡬敶敬⁃eH
楳⁥iŠm楮敤eon v敬⁂Ⱐ慮T

瑨W

M慮楳i⁍楮楳瑲W o映䕤N捡瑩cn⁨o汤猠VU攠獴V瑩獴楣慬 牥捯牤Vf⁴U攠
牥獵r瑳W


周攠M䙉 慮T⁓瑡瑩on⁎數琠p牯v楤e慴 on慬⁡Šp牯v敤⁧u楤敬楮敳e慮T
牥rou牣敳n 瑥慣Š楮g⁦楬
敤e捡瑩cn⁩渠牥污瑩on⁴o⁰ T慧og楣慬⁡灰牯Š捨敳⁡湤 捯n瑥n琮


䅦瑥r
-
獣Voo氠晩lm 捬cb猠慲攠o牧慮楳敤⁢y⁳ Uoo汳⁡湤⁣u汴l牡r爠晩rm⁩湳瑩瑵瑩WnVn慴楯n慬ⰠŠ敧eon慬Š
慮T 捡氠c敶敬献


䄠A敳e⁧ 敳猺 瑨攠湵mb敲eo映獣桯o氠捨l汤牥r

p慲瑩捩W慴Šng⁩渠晩 m⁥Tu捡瑩Wn 慣瑩v楴i敳e楳⁡i⁨楧U⁡猠
80┮


䥮景牭慬⁥Tu捡瑩on

周攠M䙉 牥r敮瑬礠獴慲V敤⁡en整wo牫r瑯⁳異po牴rform慬Š慮T⁩湦o牭慬⁥Tu捡瑩on⸠
䥮fo牭慬⁦楬m
敤e捡瑩cn⁩猠灲Vv楤敤⁢y⁡Tu汴⁣o汬敧敳Ⱐ慳⁷敬氠慳eo牧慮楳慴楯n猠獵捨⁡猠却c瑩W
n N數琬W睨楣wf晥爠
practical film production around Denmark, and DABUF (Danish Children’s Film Club), who organise
晩fm⁣汵b献V
周敹⁤敬楶敲ep牯g牡rm敳epromo瑩Wg⁣物瑩捡氠慮T⁷楤敲ev楥睩湧ⰠHnjoym敮琬⁡湤⁥獰V捩慬汹l
晩fm m慫楮g⸠
A
n業慴楯n⁴牡rn楮g⁩猠o晦敲
敤⁢礠瑨攠䅮im慴楯n 坯r歳桯pⰠ䅮im慴Šon獨V獥V⁡湤
呲略TŠ砠䅣慤敭y
3MⰠ䍇H⁡湤⁡湩m慴Šon⤮⁔U攠晵nT楮g⁣om敳ey敡en y敡爠晲om⁴U攠gov敲em敮eⰠ
瑨攠牥gion猬Vo爠晲om⁣U慲Š瑩敳⸠eU敲攠楳o⁤慴 ⁡ 慩Š慢汥n 瑨攠數p敮e楴i牥r



䅵T楯⁶楳i慬Š獥VWo爠

周攠晩fm⁩
nTu獴特H⁤敳灩W攠b敩egn⁴U攠bo慲Šf⁓瑡瑩on⁎數 ⰠHo敳 W⁦畮T⁡湹 f楬m⁰牯g牡mme猠潲
楮楴楡瑩癥V⁩渠 ur⁳ Uoo汳l


N慴楯n慬⁰ub汩挠獥Vv楣攠b牯慤捡獴c牳r⁡猠oppoV敤⁴o⁣omm敲捩慬eon敳e⁰污y⁡⁲ l攠楮⁤ v敬op楮g⁦楬
汩瑥牡捹J
M删⡄慮楳i⁂ o慤c慳琠Co牰o
牡瑩Wn⤠UŠ猠愠污lg攠晲敥⁡牣桩v攠慮T⁡⁷敢獩W攠睩瑨w瑲慩W楮g
慣瑩Š楴i敳efo爠r捨co汳
睷w⹤爮T欯獫Vl攩⸠M删慮R⁡ o瑨敲e污lg攠瑥汥v楳ion⁳ Š瑩Wn T嘲V慲Š⁢ 瑨Won 瑨攠
European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

15


board of Station Next. They don’t provide any training for education professionals though, an
T⁴U敲攠
are no attempts to measure learners’ achievements.


䍵汴l牡r⁢ T楥i

周攠n慴Šon慬⁦楬m⁡来 cyⰠHunT敤⁢礠
瑨攠M楮楳瑲y o映fu汴l牥Ⱐ
慮T⁲ gion慬⁦楬m⁡ 敮捩敳⁰eomoW攠晩fm
敤e捡瑩cn 瑯⁳ Uoo汳l⁣o汬eg敳e慮T⁵ 楶i牳r瑩敳⁶楡⁰物n琠慮Tn汩n攠r敳ou牣敳r⁣in敭愠灲og牡mm楮gⰠ
慮T⁩渠 瑨敲⁷Šy献⁔桥y⁡汳o o牧慮楳攠敶敮瑳efo爠晡m楬i敳e慮T⁣U楬T牥測⁡rT⁰ og牡mm攠晩fm猠m慩Š汹
景爠roung⁰ op汥l
慮T 捩c数U楬敳⸠eU攠M䙉⁳異por瑳W愠Še瑷or欠o映晩fm⁥Tu捡瑩Wn⁰ ov楤敲猠fo爠ro瑨⁴W攠
景牭慬⁡ŠT⁩湦orm慬Š獥V瑯爮


周攠M慮楳i慴楯n慬⁦楬 ⁡ 捨cveImuV敵eH⁷U楣i⁩ ⁧ v敲em敮琠晵eT敤e⁡汳 ⁰牯v楤敳e晩fm
敤e捡瑩cn⸠䥮⁡摤楴ionⰠHU敲攠慲攠晩Šm⁦敳eiv慬猠Šo爠c
U楬T牥渠慮T⁹oung⁰敯pl攠⡂畳瑥爬⁏r敧en
-

p慲琠
o映fUe⁃op敮e慧敮⁉e瑥牮Š瑩Wn慬⁆Šlm⁆敳瑩W慬Š⁡湤⁳ v敲慬o捡c⁦楬 ⁦ 獴Vv慬献⁆ nT楮g⁦ 爠rU敳攠
捯m敳ef牯m 瑨攠湡瑩on慬⁡nT 捡氠cov敲湭敮琮


P牯f敳獩on慬⁤ev敬opm敮琠

却慴楯n⁎ 硴⁵ 敤⁴o⁨ v攠in
-
獥牶楣
攠瑥慣Š敲e瑲慩W楮g⁦ 爠晩rm楴敲慣e⁡ ⁤楰lomŠ敶敬e⁢ 琠獣Vool猠摯
no琠獰敮T 瑨攠mon敹⁩渠瑩m敳f⁥conom楣⁣物獥rn 獵捨⁴牡rn楮g⸠周敲.⁡牥 no o瑨敲⁰Wo晥獳楯n慬Š
T敶敬opm敮琠灲og牡rm敳e慴Š瑨W猠mom敮琠楮e瑩W攮







European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

16


Estonia

Reporter(s)

Anu Krabo
,
Project Manager

Tallinn University Baltic Film and Media School

Researcher:

Michelle Cannon


Overview

Population

134,0194


Number of school age children


0
-
14 years: 15.3%

15
-
24 years: 13.4%

Estonia

doesn’t have any national or regional film education strategies in place nor any campaigning
groups.


Formal education

Film can be studied at high school as an optional separate subject and national guidelines on
teaching film education are produced. The

aims of film education include:
critical & wider viewing,
audience development and choice, understanding of film as an art form and text, access to and
understanding of national film heritage, study and understanding of different film forms or genres,
dev
elopment of textual analysis skills and development of film language and filmmaking skills.
Where film is studied, it is tested

in the form of
written research or a practical work at the end of the
course. Schools may also give grades from 1 to 5 (5 being
highest). Lack of teacher training and
sustained funding sources are recorded as barriers to progressing film education.


There don’t appear to be any after
-
school initiatives or data on how many school children
participate in film education projects in g
eneral.


Informal education

In the informal
sector, film is studied as part of media education and as a separate subject, and is
largely offered by film societies with inconsistent national and regional funding. There is a broad set
of objectives therei
n, similar to those recorded in the formal sector, however, including
social and
civic education, personal/individual development and the promotion of European and world cinema.
There is no data on expenditure nor on recorded achievements of these projects
.


Audio visual sector

The film industry subsidises film education programmes through ticket discount schemes for schools,
young people and families. Beyond that, study days, workshops and learning resources are provided
for schools and cinema screenings

for young people. Adult learners receive cinema screenings,
workshops and festival education programmes. Broadcasters support film archive and European
cinema screenings for high school students and adults.


Broadcasters do not provide training in film education for education professionals nor are there any
records of achievements in this sector.


Cultural bodies

There don’t appear to be any agencies active in the promoton film in Estonia. However there is
a
national film museum and archive and film may also be part of some museum or archive collections.
None of these institutions offer film education initiatives. In terms of film festivals, there is provision
for young people in the form of separate section
s within adult
-
oriented festivals as well as festivals
designed for specific genres of film. Festivals are funded by national and local government as well as
through tickets sales and commercial sponsorship. There is no record of any attempts to measure
ac
hievements in film education projects by cultural agencies.


European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

17


Professional development

Professional development in Estonia takes the form of training for student teachers and short course
diplomas.



European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

18


Finland

Reporter(s)

Marjo Kovanen


Producer
-

Kouluki
no (School Cinema), &
Rauna Rahja


Coordinator
-

Mediakasvatusseura (Finnish
Society on Media Education)

Researcher:

Michelle Cannon


Overview

Population

5,259,250

Number of school age children


0
-
14 years: 16 %

15
-
24 years: (not available on EC
Eurostat site)%

Although there is no overall film
education strategy in Finland,
there are severa
l agencies and non
-
government
organisations highly active in
t
he promotion of film education and which provide film
educational training and materials.


Formal education

Finnish schools form their own individual curricula on the basis of
the national core curriculum
created by The Finnish National Board of Education. Throughout the school years, film education is
part of cross
-
curricular themed media skill
s and communication
and is included in other subjects
;

it
becomes an optional separate course of study in some junior high schools and high schools. In the
formal context, there are no resources, guidelines or official systems of assessment for film
educat
ion. Overall much depends on the activity of individual teachers. The barriers to nation
-
wide
provision are recorded as: a lack of teacher training, sustained funding, resources, and national
framework. Copyright law preventing film screening in schools w
ithout associated costs, also
represents a challenges.



In the Finnish context

it is
difficult

to give any general information on film education activities
associated with formal education other than individual examples because of the

lack of nationwide
s
tructures:



Videovankkuri (Video wagon) is a national hands
-
on media education project. It offers both
video and photography workshops, whose aim is to teach children and youngsters to use
media equipment. Videovankkuri also trains teachers and others who c
an apply these skills
and knowledge in their work. Besides letting kids and young people have their voices heard,
the project records Finnish folklore and local history through photography, video and
animation
http://www.videootit.fi/videovankkuri2/



Some Finnish schools have an emphasis on film education and they have developed good
practices in this field, for example Kitisenranta school, here is their website in English:

http://koulut.sodankyla.fi/elokuvakasvatus/kitisenranta/filmeducation.htm



Some schools also organise film clubs etc, for example film club in the school on
Terv
ajoki,
municipality of Vähäkyrö
http://www.vahakyro.fi/Suomeksi/SIVISTYSPALVELUT/Tervajoen_koulu/5
-
6/
-
_elokuvakerho


In terms of after schoo
l provision,
some schools provide film clubs for pupils and/or students at local
level, this depends on the activities and interests of individual teachers.
A best guess suggests that
3
0
-
40
% of all school age children regularly take part in film education
in school
, although there is no
official data
.
The
Finnish National Board of Education frequently carries out evaluations on different
themes of the curriculum, however no evaluation on film education in schools has been done yet.


Informal education

In
Finland there exists a national infrastructure for informal education in which film education is
offered regionally.

In this context it is part of media education as well as being offered as a separate
object of study. All aspects of film education are cov
ered: critical and wider viewing, film
-
making,
European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

19


personal development, access to and understanding of popular, European and world cinema
heritage, film as both text and art form and social and civic engagement. These aims are delivered in
a variety of settin
gs:
adult colleges, film societies, galleries and museums,
the National A
udiovisual
A
rchive, libraries, regional film centres and community spaces. NGOs play a significant role in Finnish
society as well as being major stakeholders in the field of film edu
cation, for example, Koulukino
(School Cin
ema) and

Mediakasvatuskeskus Metka
. Also:





The o
nline community for young film makers Kelaamo
www.kelaamo.fi

includes
a

section for
film educators
http://kelaamo.fi/fi/Edu/



The Finnish Film Contact has
a
film education project called Kinoboxit


that provides dvd
-
collection that includes films from different themes targeted for schools, community cen
ters
and art schools.
http://www.elokuvakontakti.fi/site/?lan=1&page_id=170



IhmeFilmi is an organisation which provides film classics for youth and promotes education
of film

heritage and
history and film as an art form
http://ihmefilmi.fi/


Funding for these initiatives from regional and national government varies, but no reco
rds are kept
as to expenditure
or yo
ung people’s ach
楥vem敮瑳e楮⁴U楳

晩敬f⸠


Audio visual sector

Schools enjoy cinema screenings, study days, workshops, ticket discounts, festival education
programmes

and learning resources. Young people, children and families are provided with
screenings, clubs, festival programmes and ticket discounts.
YLE (the Finnish public service
broadcasting company) also provide training for education professionals and activiti
es for schools.
Broadcasters offer a comprehensive variety of screenings, instructional programmes, including film
history for adults, and online resources for primary, middle and high school children. Archive
material is also used as a resource for middle
, high school and adult audiences.




Cultural bodies

Film
education

is promoted by national and regional film agencies as well as cultural agencies with a
remit to include film. Activities sponsored by these agencies are funded by national and regional
government and some voluntary contributions. They produce online and published resources and
training to a wide range of audiences and cinema programming for all audiences identified in the
survey: schools, colleges, universities, families, children, young

people, local communities, cinephiles
and senior citizens. In terms of film heritage, there is a National Audiovisual Archive which provides
film education; film may also be part of some museum and archive collections.


From the beginning of the year 2012

a new public authority called The Finnish Centre for Media
Education and Audiovisual Media has been operating in the field. It also continues the tasks of the
former Finnish Board of Film Classification by enforcing age limits of audiovisual media.


Speci
fic film festivals are organised nationally and locally for a variety of audiences: for children
under 12 and for young people from 13


21, for specific groups and genres/types of film.
The
Valve
Film School for Children offers opportunities for children

to make

and edit

their own films. Every
November, the Cultural Centre Valve is the location for Oulu International Children’s and Youth Film
Festival, arranged by

the

Oulu Film Centre, and the Oskari Awards Gala for films mad
e by children
and young people
http://www.kulttuurivalve.fi/sivu/en/children_young_people/


Some other film festivals have separate sections for different ages of children and young people.
Funding

i
s provided by national, regional and local government along with commercial sponsorship
and ticket sales. Individual agencies may try to evaluate and measure film educational programmes
European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

20


for their own purposes.


Professional development

Professional educa
tors receive training both initially, before they start working and whilst they are
teaching in schools. There are no bursary schemes nor accreditation for this training neither at
Diploma nor Masters level.




European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

21


France

Reporter(s)

Loïc Joffredo

-

CLEMI
-

Centre de liaison de l'enseignement et des médias
d'information

Pierre Laporte,
Patrick Laudet

-

Ministère de l'éducation nationale, de la
jeunesse et de la vie associative

Researcher:

Michelle Cannon

Alice Guilluy


Overview

Population 65048412


Number of school age children


0
-
14 years: 18.5%

15
-
24 years: 12.4%

France has an established national film education strategy along with campaigning organisations
supporting film education. The
French education

curriculum

is decided at national level and

for
administration purposes it is divided into ‘
acadé
mies’

or academic zones; these

do not always
correspond to French
re
gions.

For the purposes of this report, references to regions will correspond
to academic zones.


Formal education

There are widespre
ad n
ational film education
projects

at primary, middle and high school levels and
f
ilm
study is offered as a distinct
option
al subject at high school. It is a
core
part of media education
across the age ranges and also features in other school subjects. These subjects include French
language and
literature and Literature
-

a compulsory subject in the literature section of the
Baccalaureate.


The aims of film educatio
n are to promote: critical viewing;
personal/individual development
;
audience development and choice
;
understanding of film as an art form

and as a text embodying
different forms and genres;
access to
and
understanding of
national, European and world cinem
a

heritage
, as well as popular cinema; and finally the development of
film language
,

textual analysis

and
filmmaking skills
. Approved guidelines and resources are issued both nationally and regionally.


In terms of evaluation,
where film is an optional sub
ject, pupils are tested

in hi
gh school with

written
and/
or oral examinations. This is dependent on
whether film
is taken
as an ind
ependent optional
subject, or
as an option within

the literary section of the B
accalaureate. In the literary section, an
annual programme of 3

films

is mandatory
, with variations made on an annual basis. Statistical
records are kept for these students’ achievements but not otherwise.


The main barrier to general nationwide provision
of film education is a lack of sustained funding
along with insufficient teacher training. However, many schools enjoy national, regional and local
provision of after school film education programmes. No specific figures have been given to indicate
how man
y young people have access to film education activities, however,
in the nationwide
Ecole
au cinéma

programme

(described in the Cultural Agency section below)
, 9% of primary,

16% of

middle school

and 7.
5% of high
school pupils

are regis
tered
.


Informal education

Film education as a separate subject is offered in informal infrastructures and the aims therein are to
promote: enjoyment, critical and wider viewing, social and civic education, personal/social
development and access to world cinema h
eritage. Film societies, galleries and museums provide
film education as well as the widespread national and regional cinémathèque network. Year on year
national and regional government funding is provided, however, there is no available data on
expenditur
e nor any records of students’ achievements on these sites of learning.

European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

22



Audio visual sector

The film industry subsidises cinema screenings, festival education programmes, ticket discount
programmes, film clubs and learning resources mainly for schools.
These activities are administrated
through the National Centre for Film and the Moving Image (CNC). Broadcasters tend to provide film
education support for adults in relation to European and world cinema screenings, whilst at the
same time investing in onl
ine resources for high school students. The national channel
France 5

collaborates on the website:
Internet
-
Ciné High School.

There is no indication of any training for film
education professionals or measurements of achievement provided by this sector.


Cultural bodies

The National Film Centre (CNC) is mandated to promote film across the country. There are also
regional bodies promoting film distribution such as
the
Centre Régional de Promotion du Cinéma

(CRPC)
associated with the

Ligue de l'enseignement
.
The CRPC, one of thirty networks, funds regional
mobile cinema projects eg.
Cinéma

Chez Nous
covering rural areas. Such initiatives are funded by the
Ministry of Culture and Communication.


The CNC

promotes online educational material to colleges and uni
versities and cinema programming
to local communities and cinephiles. They also support networks of film education providers in both
the formal and informal sectors. There are numerous film heritage institutions who also offer film
education
-

the national

film archive, regional and specialist archives, the national film museum and
those parts of other museums featuring film in their collections.


Specific festivals are organized at local level with a variety of funding bodies. There are festivals
specific
ally for children under 12 (eg.
http://www.monpremierfestival.org/

in Paris), young people
and students respectively and those more genre
-
specific. Funding sources include local and regional
government


w
here elements of film education are required


as well as commercial sponsorship
and ticket sales. Cultural agencies are not required to monitor achievements in film education
initiatives.


Professional development

Th
ere is no systematic training
in film

literacy

or bursaries available for

film education professionals,
however, qualified teachers receive in
-
service training within the established
École et cinéma,
Collège au cinéma

and
Lycéens et apprentis au cinema
frameworks under the aegis of the CNC.
F
urthermore,

i
n
-
service teachers can
gain

certification
for teaching the film option at

Baccalaureate

level.



European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

23


Germany

Reporter:

Sarah Duve, Managing Director
VISION KINO

Researcher: Caren Willig

Additional comments

and endorsement
:
Prof.
Dr. Markus
Köster

Leiter des LWL
-
Medienzentrums für Westfalen


Overview

Population

81,751,602


Number of school age children

0
-
14 years: 13.4%

15
-
24 years: 11.2%

There is no national film education strategy as
the 16 federal states and city states have the
authority over education issues, which make it hard to formulate one strategy. However,
all

federal
states have various strategies for media education in general

and most of them for film education in
particul
ar
, and VISION KINO established a partial strategy in regards to the national school film
weeks.
In 2010 the “Länderkonferenz MedienBildung”, a board of representatives for Media
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(“Kultusministerkonferenz”)
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European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

24


film mu
seums; film location tours; learning resources; and film education programmes, such as the
national film school weeks (funded by the federal film board and various film funds of the federal
states). There are also ticket discounts and special family events
.


Public service broadcasters, who have an obligation to educate by law, offer children’s programmes
and a children’s channel (KiKa). There are also open channels within the countries, providing active
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roadcasters offer children’s channels too, but
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Planet Schule

(WDR
/SWR
),
which focuses on school matters in general, not specifically on film education.


Cultural bodies

There is a
national film agency, some
federal state
film agencies, and national and
federal state
cultural agencies offering support for film education. All of these are funded by the national and
federal state
government
s
, commercial sources and the broadcasters. Th
ere are also many different
organisations
, institutions, associations, initiatives and groups promoting film
-

for children, youth
etc.

These cultural bodies promote film education online and in print to
schools, colleges, universities,
families and child
ren
, and

young people
.

Cinemas offer special screenings for schools for a reduced
admissions fee.


Film education providers in the formal and informal sector are financed in different ways by
ministries and others. VISION KINO, as a public private partners
hip, is both: a sort of nationwide film
cultural body and also a network for film education.


There are numerous film heritage institutions in Germany. Museums, archives and TV/media
companies also often archive films. Film education is provided by heritag
e institutions, such as the
national film archive/museum, and many regional film archives/museums and their cinemas.

Film festivals, which have various funding sources, play to specific audiences including

children
(under 12), young people (13
-
21), local
communities, and special interest groups. Many film festivals
offer special film education activities.


Professional development

Due to the federal structure of Education
-
Policy in Germany, t
here is no national professional
training programme, but
in rec
ent years


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European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

25


Greece

Reporter(s):
Irene Andriopoulou
,
Media
Researcher


Media Literacy
Consultant

Researcher: Michelle Cannon

Additional comments: Menis Theodoridis, film
director and media education specialist


Overview

Population

11,309,885

Number of school age children

0


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‘Audiovisual Expression’
H

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-
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‘Audiovisual Expression’ activities,

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汩瑥牡r
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䙯r

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o牧慮楳


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F
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f
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on⁹敡爠牥gion慬⁦ŠnT楮g⸠.瑨敲⁳ou牣敳
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TVf⁡捨楥vem敮e⁡猬 fo爠r硡mp汥Ⱐ
瑨攠
獣桯o氠灲oj散e•䍩Ce
-
M慴桩m慴愢⁩渠䍲 瑥 睨敲wⁱ 敳瑩Wnn慩Š敳e慲攠桡ŠT敤eou琠慦瑥爠獣牥敮楮g猠o爠
瑨攠慣瑩v楴i敳eo映f䝏•䭡牰o猢V睨敲w⁣U楬T牥渧猠慵V楯v楳i慬⁴數瑳⁡牥 pub汩獨敤 on⁴U攠獩V攮


European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

26



Audio visual sector

The film industry takes an active role in film education activity, offering school cinema screenings,
general and festival educational programming, learning resources, weekend film clubs, ticket
discount schemes and adult master classes.
Greek Radio Televi
sion
ERT SA, the
n
ational
p
ublic
s
ervice
b
roadcaster
, participates in and supports film education activities in the audiovisual and
formal education sector,
including

the joint initiative with EDU TV Greece and the Drama Short Film
Festival for
primary sch
ool children
, the

Olympia Film Festival, the School Lab
,

the School Tube,
and
the educational Mikropolis Festival. There is no indication of any private commercial broadcasters’
楮volvem敮e⁷楴i⁦楬m 敤ec慴楯n.


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on汩n攠汥慲l楮g⁲敳eu牣敳efo爠灲im慲礠瑨牯ugU⁴o⁨楧U 獣桯o氠獴畤敮e献⁉V⁡摤楴楯nⰠH慴敲楡e
p牯Tu捥搠on⁥Tu捡瑩on⁰ o橥j瑳W捯nTu捴敤⁢礠䕄U⁔嘠䝲敥G攠晥f瑵牥Won⁅R吠十⁤u物rg⁣U楬T牥渧猠
p牯g牡rm楮g⸠卯me

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-
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敤e捡瑩cn.


䍵汴l牡r⁢ T楥i

周攠n慴Šon慬⁦楬m⁡来 cyⰠ
Greek Film Centre
, is supervised and funded by the Ministry of Culture and
Tourism. It does not, however, promote film education, which
was,

until recently,

the responsibility
of the national research organization on audiovisual media


W
Ue
H敬汥湩c⁁ T楯v楳i慬⁉Š獴楴畴攠
(
䥏䴩⸠周楳To牧慮楳慴楯n⁰牯moW敤⁦楬m楴 牡捹⁡湤敤e愠ŠTu捡瑩on⁩渠 orm慬⁡ŠT⁩湦o牭慬⁣on瑥x瑳W
with numerous publications, online content and children’s film archive.
䅳⁡⁲ 獵V琠of⁣u瑳WTue⁴o⁴Ue
散enom楣⁣物獩iⰠHUe慴 on慬⁡牣Š楶i


歮k睮⁡w

W
U攠H
敬汥湩挠N慴Šon慬⁁uT楯v楳iŠ氠䅲捨cve



慮T⁴U攠
䥏䴠m敮瑩o
n敤⁡eov攬e睥牥rbo瑨⁡扯汩獨敤
n 5
th

December 2011 and the
ir

remit and functions
were transferred to the national

broadcaster, ERT SA.


The Thessaloniki Cinema Museum, supervised by the Ministry of
Culture and Tourism
,

is the only
national film museum. It provides a wide range of film education programmes for students of all
school levels, from preschool to high school. The most established and recognised festival is the
International Olympia Film Fe
stival for Children and Young People.
G
overnment funded festival
s

(via
the Ministry of Culture and Tourism,
MELLRA

or IOM)
include

a film education component. Finally,
the Greek Film Archive is a non
-
profit cultural organization whose purpose is to
research, collect,
conserve and promote Greek and international film heritage; it organises cinema screenings and
clubs for students and adults.


As with other sectors, any measuring of achievement is unevenly recorded, however they do ask for
evidence of

impact in relation to larger festival initiatives.


Professional development

Both trainee teachers and in
-
service teachers are offered film literacy input in the form of optional
National Guidelines. For students of the Film Studies Faculty at Aristotle

University in Thessaloniki

and the National and Kapodistrian University in Athens, Faculty of Communication and Media
Studies
, there are courses on film education
. Moreover, in the form of
accredited postgraduate
qualifications at national level
, the most

detailed course is the cross
-
university Master Course “ICT in
Education”, operating since 2005.




European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

27


Hungary

Reporter(s):

László Hartai
,
Chairman of the
Hungarian Moving Picture and Media Education
Asso
c
iation,

and

Anette Hilbert
,
Lecturer,
Department of
Film, King Sigismund College and
Foreign Relations Officer, Hungarian Moving
Picture and Media Education Association

Researcher: Michelle Cannon

Additional commentary:
Dr. Imre Szijártó
, Dr.
Imre Szijártó, Head of the MA on Film Pedagogy,
Eszterházy Károly

University


Overview

Population

9,985,722

Number of school age children

0


14⁹敡牳e14.6┠楮 2011

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24 y敡牳†12⸳┠楮 2011

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獵V橥j琮⁈敮W攠瑨W猠捯u汤⁢攠con獴牵敤⁡ ⁡ n慴Šon慬⁳W牡瑥杹r


䙯牭慬⁥Tu捡瑩on

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敤e捡瑩cn⁩猠獵V獵V敤⁩e⁡⁢牯慤⁡湤⁡汬
-
楮捬c獩v攠noW楯nf
media education
, known as Moving
Image Culture and Media Knowledge. This is a core subject offered for o
ne year at the end of
primary school (14 years of age) and then for an additional year at the end of secondary (17/18 years
of age). It includes many social and critical dimensions as well as film making. Film education,
although not formally recognised as

a distinct subject, is rather seen as a
counterpart

to the study of
media; it also features in other subjects of study such as literature and visual culture.


A stringent approval process precedes a nationally sanctioned set of resources and accompanying
training. They have developed systems of assessment and collated national results in the higher
band of education which are available on the internet. As regards after
-
school film clubs, these are
organised at a local level.


Official figures suggest that

approx. 17% of school children participate in film education activities,
whereas Lazslo suggests the real figure is more like 10%. These figures take into account the fact
that film education, albeit a core subject, is only studied for 2 separate years in

primary and
secondary education.


Informal education

Informal structures for film education are few in number, however, there are national tenders for
film education schemes which have a significant number of respondents, largely from film clubs.
They d
eliver programmes promoting wider viewing, enjoyment and film making in a variety of
contexts from the institutional and educational to community spaces. Local government also funds
such projects.


The Hungarian Motion Picture Public Foundation used to sup
port informal film education but was
abolished in 2010; it had been in operation for 20 years. At present, it is in the remit of the National
Hungarian Cultural Fund to fund film clubs and festivals.


Audio visual sector

The film industry provides scree
nings for schools as well as festival education programmes. One of
the largest film distributors, Budapest Film, funds free secondary school screenings. The industry
also organise special screenings with guest speakers for adults.


European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

28


As far as national broa
dcasters are concerned, over the past 15 years a public broadcasting service
called Duna Television programmed quality films however such channels lost their independency in
2010 with the introduction of new legislation. It’s unclear as yet how the new law
猠牥gu污瑩lg⁐ub汩c
卥牶楣S⁂ o慤捡獴敲猠睩汬⁡w晥捴 瑨攠煵慬Š瑹f⁦楬 楴敲慣Š⸠


䉲B慤捡c瑥牳⁤rŠ眠獩Vn楦i捡n瑬W on⁦楬 V⁡牣桩v敳eŠ猠愠p牯g牡rm楮g⁳ou牣r⁦ r⁹oung⁡畤楥i捥c
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⸠P牯v楳ion⁩猠m慤e
by⁢牯慤捡獴V牳⁴o⁴牡rn⁦楬m⁡湤 m敤e愠瑥慣Š敲猠楮 w敥k
-
long⁦楬
-
m慫楮g 睯wk獨潰献


䍵汴l牡r⁢ T楥i

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獰散楦V挠晵nT楮g⁦ r
敤e捡瑩on慬⁰牯g牡mm楮g⸠


周攠N慴Šon慬⁁uT楯v楳i慬⁁牣r楶i o映䡵ng慲Š⁷慳⁰慲瑬y⁥V瑡扬楳i敤⁦o爠r牡rn楮g⁡nT⁥Tu捡瑩cn慬Š
pu牰o獥献⁉渠慤T楴ionⰠ愠numb敲eo映f敳eiv慬猠慲攠p牯gr慭m敤⁦o爠摩獴楮V琠慵T楥ic敳e楮捬cT楮g⁦ 爠
捨c汤牥測⁹oung⁰敯pl攠慮T⁳灥捩慬⁩
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慮T⁣omm敲捩慬⁢慳Š献


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䙩汭楴敲慣Š⁩猠楮捬cT敤⁩e⁩n楴楡i⁴敡捨敲e瑲慩W楮g⁡ ⁷敬氠慳⁩e
-
獥Vv楣攠p牯f敳獩onŠ氠瑲慩l楮g⸠.ov楮g
䥭慧攠䍵汴lr攠慮T M敤e愠Ono睬敤we⁩

o晦敲敤⁡琠䉁 ☠MA v敬⁦o爠睨楣w業i瑥T⁢ 牳慲r敳e獣桥m敳e
慲攠慶慩Š慢汥⸠
周敲攠慲攠慬Šo⁳ o牴敲⁣敲瑩晩捡W敤⁰eV瑧牡Tu慴Š⁣ou牳敳⸠Lim楴敤⁦inT猠慲攠m慤攠
available to schools towards teachers’ postgraduate study.




European Film Litera
cy Survey 2012
full draft1

29


Iceland

Reporter(s)

Guðni
Olgeirsson

& Þórunn Jóna Hauksdottir


Advisors, Dept of
Education,
Ministry of Education, Science and Culture

Laufey
Guðjónsdóttir


Director, Icelandic Film Centre

Researcher:

Michelle Cannon


Overview

Population

318452

Number of school age children


0
-
14 years: 20.9%

15
-
24 years: 14.7%

There is currently no national film education strategy.
However, in October 2011 research was
commissioned on the needs of the film industry as regards film education
. The resultant report:
“Film Education in Iceland
” (Feb 2012) has been partially translated into English and points

to a need
to establish film literacy in the primary and seconda
ry years as standard;

not only as a means of
providing the i
ndustry with skilled individuals,

but also because young people ar
e recognised as
being strong consumers of film and that film “could have a formative influence on their opinions and
philosophy on life”.

In addition to this,
in early 2012 the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture
appointed a steering group to form a

policy on education for film makers. The objective is to provide
a basis for strengthening education and film making in Iceland, built on extensive consultation with
stakeholders, including
those
schools
already
offering the craft of film making.


Formal

education

The national government issues guidelines for schools who then adapt and create individual
curricula for their own school. For primary and middle schooling film education is included in other
subjects namely Information and Communication Technol
ogy (ICT) and partly in life skills. The
national curriculum for compulsory education is being revised in 2012 and media literacy


including
film education
-

will ependebe integrated into social studies, Icelandic (the mother tongue) and ICT.


The aims of

film as a subject of study are to develop critical viewing, social and civic education,
understanding of film as a text and for audience development and choice. National approved
resources as well as regional guidelines are produced. Achievements in film
education are not
monitored or tested in any way. Film clubs associated with schools are locally or regionally based.


Nation
-
wide provision of film education is held back by the low status of film education, a lack of
teacher training, of guidelines and o
f framework.
However, the report mentioned above highlights
the activities of a few secondary schools who have taken the initiative to develop film study and film
making independently:

“E
ven

if

a

full
-
fledged

film

study

is

not

an

option

in

I
celandic

secondary

schools

and

universities,

it

does

not

imply

total

absence

of

film

studies

in

the

country.

Within

the

public

school

sector,

two

secondary

schools,

Borgarholt

and

Flensborg
,

have

construed

studies

in

film

making

based

on

previous

study

policy

guide

on

media

technique.

Both

schools

nurture

plans

on

advanced

studies

in

film

making,

based

on

these

present

options.

In

addition

to

this,

the

Ármúli

Comprehensive
School

is

currently

developing

pioneering

studies

where

film

making

will

be

an

important

factor.

The

W
-
Northland

Comprehensive
School

intends

to

initiate

film

studies

in

cooperation

with

a
local

film

company
and