VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY 2009

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VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
TECHNOLOGY
2009
Study Programme/Specialisation in
Electrical Engineering and Automation Technology
Electrician
Automation Assembler
Publications 2011:18Regulation 23/011/2009
Requirements for Vocational Qualifications
© Finnish National Board of Education
Publications 2011:18
ISBN 978-952-13-4870-9 (pdf )
Translation (Chapters 1.1, 1.2, 4, 9): Lingoneer Oy
Layout: Layout Studio Oy/Marke Eteläaho
www.oph.fi/english
REGULATION
11 June 2009 23/011/2009
Period of validity:
effective 1 Aug 2009 until further notice
Vocational upper secondary education and training providers
Qualification committees in the field
Acts on which the issuing of the Regulation
is based:
Act 630/1998, Section 13 (2)
Decree 811/1998, Section 10 (12)
Act 631/1998 13, Section (2)
Repeals National Board of Education Regulations
17.2.2000 no. 23/011/2000
19.6.2006 no. 34/011/2006
and for this qualification the following Regulations
1.8.2001 no. 42/011/2001
19.6.2002 no. 34/011/2002
27.8.2004 no. 28/011/2004
30.9.2005 no. 32/011/2005
13.2.2007 no. 5/011/2007
REQUIREMENTS FOR VOCATIONAL
QUALIFICATIONS Amends National Board of Education Regulation
Vocational Qualification in In Electrical Engineering and
Automation Technology –
The Finnish National Board of Education has rendered its decision regarding
the qualification requirements (national core curriculum and competence-based
qualification principles) of the Vocational Qualification in Electrical Engineering and
Automation Technology in accordance with the annexe.
The Regulation must be observed in all upper secondary education and training
(curriculum-based education and training) and competence-based qualifications
started after 1 August 2009. All education and training and competence-based
qualifications that have started prior to the entry of this Regulation into force may
be completed in accordance with Regulations 17.2.2000 no. 23/011/2000 and
19.6.2006 no. 34/011/2006 by 31 July 2019, unless otherwise stipulated in other
statutes and Regulations.
In curriculum-based education and training, the education provider must draw
up and approve a curriculum in compliance with the terms stipulated in these
qualification requirements.
In providing education and training leading to a competence-based qualification, the
education provider determines the educational content and provision in accordance
with the qualification requirements. An opportunity to complete a competence-based
qualification must be provided to all candidates.
The education provider, qualification provider and qualification committee shall
comply with the terms stipulated in this Regulation and shall not deviate in any way
from it.
Director General Timo Lankinen
Chief Technologist Lauri Kurvonen

ANNEXE Vocational Qualification in Electrical Engineering and Automation Technology
4
CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION
7
1
OBJECTIVES AND STRUCTURE OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY
8
1.1 Objectives of the Vocational Qualification in Electrical Engineering and Automation Technology
8
1.2 The structure of the Vocational Qualification in Electrical Engineering and Automation Technology
9
1.3 Key competences for lifelong learning
12
1.4 Eligibility for further studies
15
2
IMPLEMENTATION OF NATIONAL REQUIREMENTS IN CURRICULUM-BASED VOCATIONAL
EDUCATION AND TRAINING
16
2.1 Design and contents of the curriculum
16
2.1.1 Common part of the curriculum
17
2.1.2 Qualification specific part of the curriculum
17
2.1.3 Individual study plan
18
3
COMPLETING A VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION AS A COMPETENCE-BASED QUALIFICATION
19
3.1 General on competence-based qualification system
19
3.2 Arranging competence-based qualifications
19
3.3 Completing a competence-based qualification
20
3.4 Requirements of competence-based qualifications
20
3.5 Individualisation in competence-based qualifications
21
3.6 Assessment of vocational skills in a competence-based qualification
21
3.7 Certificates
22
3.8 Preparatory training for competence-based qualifications
23
4
VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL
QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY
24
4.1 Compulsory modules for all
24
4.1.1 Fundamental skills in electrical engineering and automation technology
24
4.1.2 Electrical and automation installations
31
4.2 Study Programme in Electrical Engineering and Automation Technology, Electrician
38
4.2.1 Electrical engineering and energy technology
38
4.3 Study Programme in Electrical Engineering and Automation Technology, Automation Assembler
48
4.3.1 Discrete automation
48
4.3.2 Process automation
53
4.4 Optional modules for all
58
4.4.1 Property automation and it systems
58
4.4.2 Electrical network installations (1kv–20kv)
65
4.4.3 Module from a vocational upper secondary qualification
70
4.4.4 Module from a further vocational qualification
71
4.4.5 Module from a specialist vocational qualification
71
4.4.6 Locally offered module
72
5
4.5 Other optional modules in vocational upper secondary education and training
72
4.5.1 Entrepreneurship
72
4.5.2 Workplace instructor training
77
4.5.3 Core subjects
80
4.5.4 General upper secondary studies
80
4.6 Modules providing individual in-depth vocational competence
(modules that expand the scope of a vocational upper secondary qualification)
81
4.6.1 Business Operations
81
4.6.2 Modules from vocational qualifications (vocational upper secondary qualifications,
further vocational qualifications and specialist vocational qualifications)
85
4.6.3 Locally offered modules providing in-depth vocational competence in
curriculum-based vocational education and training
87
4.7 Final project in curriculum-based vocational education and training
87
5
THE OBJECTIVES AND ASSESSMENT OF CORE SUBJECTS IN CURRICULUM-BASED VOCATIONAL
EDUCATION AND TRAINING
88
5.1 Compulsory modules
88
5.1.1 Mother tongue
88
5.1.1.1 Mother tongue, Finnish 88
5.1.1.2 Mother tongue, Swedish 91
5.1.1.3 Mother tongue, Saami 91
5.1.1.4 Mother tongue, sign language 93
5.1.1.5 Mother tongue, one’s own mother tongue for foreign language users 96
5.1.1.6 Mother tongue, Finnish as a second language 98
5.1.1.7 Mother tongue, Swedish as a second language 100
5.1.1.8 Mother tongue, Finnish or Swedish for sign language users 101
5.1.1.9 Mother tongue, Romany 103
5.1.2 Second national language
104
5.1.2.1 Second national language, Swedish 104
5.1.2.2 Second national language, Finnish 106
5.1.3 Foreign language
108
5.1.3.1 Foreign language, A language 108
5.1.3.2 Foreign language, B language 110
5.1.4 Mathematics
112
5.1.5 Physics and chemistry
113
5.1.6 Social, business and labour-market subjects
116
5.1.7 Physical education
117
5.1.8 Health education
119
5.1.9 Arts and culture
121
5.2 Optional modules
122
5.2.1 Optional additional modules to compulsory core subjects
122
5.2.2 Environmental studies
123
5.2.3 Information and communications technology
125
5.2.4 Ethics
127
5.2.5 Cultural knowledge
129
5.2.6 Psychology
130
5.2.7 Entrepreneurship
133
6
FREE CHOICE MODULES IN CURRICULUM-BASED VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING
136
6
7
STUDENT ASSESSMENT IN CURRICULUM-BASED VOCATIONAL UPPER SECONDARY
EDUCATION AND TRAINING
137
7.1 Tasks and objectives of assessment
137
7.2 Informing about assessment
137
7.3 Recognition and validation of a student’s prior learning
138
7.4 Assessment of learning and competence
140
7.5 Deciding on the grade
142
7.6 Storing assessment material
143
7.7 Reassessment and improving the grade
143
7.8 Rectification of assessment
143
7.9 Certificates
143
7.10 Assessment in special education
147
7.11 Assessing immigrant students and those representing different languages and cultures
148
8
OTHER REGULATIONS IN CURRICULUM-BASED VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING
150
8.1 Guidance and counselling and personal study plan
150
8.2 On-the-job learning and working safety
152
8.3 Vocational special education
153
8.4 Teaching immigrants and representatives of different language and cultural groups
155
8.5 Apprenticeship training
158
8.6 Cooperation between home and educational institution
159
8.7 Student welfare services
159
9
APPENDIX
161
9.1 Description and basic values of Electrical Engineering and Automation Technology
161
9.2 Qualification specific health requirements in vocational upper secondary education and training
162
9.3 Vocational skills requirements, targets of assessment and general assessment criteria
163
7
A vocational qualification can be completed both as a curriculum or competence-
based qualification. The requirements of a vocational qualification include both the
requirements of the upper secondary vocational qualification and the requirements
of a competence-based qualification and therefore their terminology has been made
more uniform. The requirements of a vocational qualification is a regulation and
it guides the providers of both curriculum-based training as well as competence-
based qualifications, and the electronic version of the qualification requirements
document allows one to distinguish, when necessary, the sections that relate to vo-
cational upper secondary education and training (curriculum-based training) and
competence-based training. Chapters 1 and 4 together with the parts describing the
vocational field and the value basis in Chapter 9 are common. Chapters 2, 5, 6, 7
and 8 only concern vocational qualifications completed in vocational upper second-
ary education and training and Chapter 3 those completed as competence-based
qualifications.
The term module of a qualification compares with the term of study entity
used earlier in curriculum-based training. A qualification consists of vocational
study modules and in vocational upper secondary education and training also of
core subjects and free choice modules. Additional modules can be included in a
qualification when that is necessary in view of working life sector specific or local
vocational requirements or the need for in-depth professional skills of the would-be
qualification holder.
The requirements of a vocational qualification state the objectives set for the
qualification and study programme or specialisation, structure of qualification,
module specific skills requirements or objectives, targets of assessment and assess-
ment criteria for core subjects as well as the ways of demonstrating vocational skills
in the case of vocational study modules. These requirements also include other pro-
visions concerning vocational upper secondary education and training as well as
competence-based qualifications.
The requirements of vocational qualification modules and the objectives of
core subjects have been defined as learning outcomes (knowledge, skills, compe-
tence). This forms the basis for describing the targets of assessment through master-
ing the work process, work method, equipment and material as well as underpin-
ning knowledge and the key competences for lifelong learning.
An education provider approves a curriculum for upper secondary vocational
education and training based on the qualification requirements. When arranging
preparatory training for competence-based qualifications, the provider decides its
contents and how to arrange it in compliance with the qualification requirements.
INTRODUCTION
8
1.1 OBJECTIVES OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY
Those who have completed the Vocational Qualification in Electrical Engineering
and Automation Technology have a broad range of professional skills and the means
to develop them further. They are reliable, quality conscious, customer-oriented,
co-operative, they show initiative, and they work in accordance with the rules of
working life. They know how to apply the skills and information learnt to different
working life situations. They see their work as part of a larger whole and can take
the tasks of professionals working in neighbouring fields into consideration in their
own work. The professionals in electrical engineering and automation technology
work in line with the quality requirements of the field and operate the equipment
and handle all materials carefully and economically, knowing how to plan their
work using drawings and work instructions, prepare work-related material and cost
estimates, and present and evaluate their own work.
The completion of the Vocational Qualification in Electrical Engineering and
Automation Technology will equip the student with the basic level of expertise nec-
essary to carry out installation, service and maintenance tasks related to electrical
engineering and automation technology. It is essential that those working in the
field always follow the regulations pertaining to working safety, electrical safety, and
electrical installation safety and that they master the basics of electrical engineering,
automation technology and information technology. Knowledge of and the ability
to handle the materials and components used is also required in all electrical engi-
neering and automation technology tasks. Basic education and training in electrical
engineering and automation technology will endow the student with a good ability
to develop him-/herself and his/her professional skills further and to be an active
member of the information society.
Those who have completed the Vocational Qualification in Electrical Engi-
neering and Automation Technology know how to work as an electrical engineering
and automation technology professional in an environmentally conscious manner,
supporting material and energy efficiency.
OBJECTIVES AND STRUCTURE OF
THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
TECHNOLOGY
1
9
The Automation Assemblers who have completed the Study Programme or Specialisation in Electrical
Engineering and Automation Technology know how to carry out demanding tasks requiring
electrical engineering and automation technology expertise in the installation, op-
eration, maintenance and service of industrial electrical machinery and equipment
and in automation systems in accordance with the electrical installation standards
and regulations. Key areas of competence include different adjustment, discrete and
control room systems, robotics, and mastering installation and maintenance work
thereof.
The Electricians who have completed the Study Programme or Specialisation in Electrical Engi-
neering and Automation Technology know how to carry out tasks related to the electrical
installations, use, service and maintenance of housing, business, office, industrial,
and public properties in accordance with electrical installation standards and regula-
tions. Key areas of competence include electrical and real estate automation instal-
lations related to electrical building technology, or tasks related to the installation,
operation, service and maintenance of the electrical network in accordance with
electrical network standards and regulations.
In addition vocational upper secondary education and training is to support
students’ development into good and balanced persons and members of society as
well as to provide the students with the knowledge and skills needed in view of ver-
satile development of further studies, hobbies and his/her personality as well as to
support lifelong learning (Act 630/98, section 5).
1.2 THE STRUCTURE OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGI-
NEERING AND AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY
VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY, 120 CREDITS
IN VOCATIONAL UPPER SECONDARY EDUCATION AND TRAINING IN A COMPETENCE-BASED QUALIFICATION
4. Vocational modules, 90 credits 4. Vocational modules
The modules include a minimum of 20 credits of
on-the-job-learning, a minimum of 5 credits of
entrepreneurship and a final project (2 credits).
4.1 Compulsory modules for all
4.1.1 Fundamental skills in electrical engineering
and automation technology, 30 cr
4.1.2 Electrical and automation installations, 20 cr
4.1 Compulsory modules for all
4.1.1 Fundamental skills in electrical engineer-
ing and automation technology
4.1.2 Electrical and automation installations
10
OBJECTIVES AND STRUCTURE OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY
1
IN VOCATIONAL UPPER SECONDARY EDUCATION AND TRAININGIN A COMPETENCE-BASED QUALIFICATION
4.2 Study Programme in Electrical Engineering and Automation
Technology, Electrician
4.2.1 Electrical engineering and energy
technology, 20 cr
4.2 Specialisation in Electrical Engineering and Automation
Technology, Electrician
4.2.1 Electrical engineering and energy
technology
4.3 Study Programme in Electrical Engineering and Automation
Technology, Automation Assembler
One of the following two vocational modules is to
be chosen:
4.3.1 Discrete automation, 20 cr
or
4.3.2 Process automation, 20 cr
4.3 Specialisation in Electrical Engineering and Automation
Technology, Automation Assembler
One of the following two vocational modules is
to be chosen
4.3.1 Discrete automation
or
4.3.2 Process automation
4.4 Optional modules for all, 10–20 cr
4.4.1 Property automation and IT systems, 20 cr
4.4.2 Electrical network installations (1–20kV),
20 cr
4.4.3 Module from a vocational upper secondary
qualification, 0–20 cr
4.4.4 Module from a further vocational
qualification
4.4.5 Module from a specialist vocational
qualification
4.4.6 Locally offered module, 0–20 cr
4.4 Optional modules for all
One of the above modules not yet taken is to be
selected (4.2.1, 4.3.1 or 4.3.2) or one of
the modules below (4.4.1–4.4.3).
4.4.1 Property automation and IT systems
4.4.2 Electrical network installations (1–20kV)
4.4.3 Module from another vocational upper
secondary qualification (in vocational up-
per secondary education and training, the
nominal scope of the module must be at
least 20 credits)
or
two modules from another vocational up-
per secondary qualification (in vocational
upper secondary education and training,
the nominal scope of each module must
be at least 10 credits)
4.4.4 Module from a further vocational
qualification
4.4.5 Module from a specialist vocational
qualification
4.5 Other optional modules in vocational upper secondary educa-
tion and training, 0–10 cr
4.5.1 Entrepreneurship, 10 cr
4.5.2 Workplace instructor training, 2 cr
4.5.3 Core subjects
4.5.4 General upper secondary studies
The modules in 4.4 and 4.5 must total 20 credits.
11
IN VOCATIONAL UPPER SECONDARY EDUCATION AND TRAINING IN A COMPETENCE-BASED QUALIFICATION
4.6 Modules providing individual in-depth vocational
competence (modules that expand the scope of
a vocational upper secondary qualification)
4.6.1 Business operations, 10 cr
4.6.2 Modules from vocational qualifications
(vocational upper secondary qualifications,
further vocational qualifications and
specialist vocational qualifications)
4.6.3 Locally offered modules providing in-depth
vocational competence in curriculum-based
vocational education and training
4.6 Modules providing individual in-depth vocational
competence (modules that expand the scope of
a vocational upper secondary qualification)
4.6.1 Business operations
4.6.2 Modules from vocational qualifications
(vocational upper secondary qualifica-
tions, further vocational qualifications and
specialist vocational qualifications)
IN VOCATIONAL UPPER SECONDARY EDUCATION
5. Core subjects in curriculum-based vocational education and training, 20 credits
5.1 Compulsory modules for all Compulsory Optional
5.1.1 Mother tongue
5.1.2 Second national language
5.1.2.1 Second national language, Swedish
5.1.2.2 Second national language, Finnish
5.1.3 Foreign language
5.1.4 Mathematics
5.1.5 Physics and chemistry
5.1.6 Social, business and labour-market subjects
5.1.7 Physical education
5.1.8 Health education
5.1.9 Arts and culture
4 credits
1 credit
1 credit
2 credits
2 credits
3 credits
2 credits
1 credit
1 credit
1 credit
1 credit
0–4 credits
0–4 credits
0–4 credits
0–4 credits
0–4 credits
0–4 credits
0–4 credits
0–4 credits
0–4 credits
5.2 Optional modules
5.2.1 Optional additional modules to compulsory core subjects,
see Chapters 5.1.1–5.1.9 above
5.2.2 Environmental studies
5.2.3 Information and communications technology
5.2.4 Ethics
5.2.5 Cultural knowledge
5.2.6 Psychology
5.2.7 Entrepreneurship
0–4 credits
0–4 credits
0–4 credits
0–4 credits
0–4 credits
0–4 credits
16 credits 4 credits
In education provided in Swedish, the scope of studies in the second national language is 2 credits,
and the scope of the compulsory core subjects in vocational qualification is 17 credits and the scope of
optional modules is 3 credits.
The scope of compulsory studies in both physical education and health education is 1 credit. Education
provider can divide the compulsory studies in physical education and health education differently, but
yet in such a way that their overall scope totals two credits.
6. Free-choice modules in vocational upper secondary education, 10 credits
The qualification modules comprise a minimum of 1.5 credits of student counselling
12
OBJECTIVES AND STRUCTURE OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY
1
Principles of the structure of a vocational upper secondary qualification
Vocational upper secondary qualifications are made up of vocational modules, which
are either compulsory or optional. Curriculum-based qualifications also include
compulsory and optional core subjects as well as free choice modules. It must also be
possible to include more modules, which enhance the qualification, when necessary
in order to meet sector specific working life requirements or local vocational skills
requirements and to enrich the candidate’s vocational skills. Qualification specific
rules on optional modules are presented above in The structure of the Vocational
Qualification in Electrical Engineering and Automation Technology table.
Student (curriculum-based training) or candidate (competence-based qualifi-
cations) can also include modules from other vocational qualifications into his/her
vocational upper secondary qualification.
To improve his/her eligibility to pursue further studies a student can choose
general upper secondary studies, even take the matriculation examination. These
studies can compensate for core subjects, other optional qualification modules and
free choice studies.
To facilitate making choices and validation of prior learning easier, the com-
pensation principles for studies completed or to be completed in a general upper
secondary school have been described in Section 5 Core subjects. Defining the prin-
ciples of compensation also promotes cooperation between education providers and
the use of common training provision.
Completing the whole qualification is the primary goal in education and train-
ing leading to a qualification provided in accordance with the Act on Vocational
Education and Training. A student can also take a vocational qualification one or
more modules at a time to give a more profession specific result when it is appro-
priate considering the individual’s learning abilities, life situation or employability.
The student must have flexible opportunities to complete the qualification at a later
date. In these kinds of situations the education provider draws up a plan, preferably
in cooperation with the employer, for the student or candidate for completing the
qualification.
1.3 KEY COMPETENCES FOR LIFELONG LEARNING
These key competences for lifelong learning are taken to mean such competence as
is needed in continuous learning, in seizing future and new situations as well as in
coping with the changing working life environment. They are an important part of
vocational skills and reflect an individual’s intellectual flexibility and ability to man-
13
age different situations. They increase the vocational civilisation and civic readiness
needed in all fields and help the students or candidates to keep up with the changes
in society and working life as well as to act under changing conditions. They also
play a major part in one’s quality of life and development of personality.
In addition to common emphases of the previous core curriculum of voca-
tional upper secondary education, the Requirements of competence-based qualifica-
tions and key competences common to all vocational fields, the key competences for
lifelong learning are considered to include cross-curricular themes from basic and
general upper secondary education together with the recommendations for the key
competences for lifelong learning 2005/0221 (COD) made by the European Union
Parliament and the Commission.
The key competences for lifelong learning are included in the objectives of the
requirements of vocational qualification modules and their assessment criteria. The
key competences for lifelong learning to be assessed separately consist of the follow-
ing: learning and problem solving, interaction and cooperation, vocational ethics
and health, safety and ability to function.
Key competences for lifelong learning are
1. Learning and problem solving
2. Interaction and cooperation
3. Vocational ethics
4. Health, safety and ability to function
5. Initiative and entrepreneurship
6. Sustainable development
7. Aesthetics
8. Communication and media skills
9. Mathematics and natural sciences
10. Technology and information technology
11. Active citizenship and different cultures
Description of the key competences for lifelong learning
Learning and problem solving
The student or candidate plans his/her activities and develops himself/herself and
the work. He/she assesses his/her own competence, solves problems and makes de-
cisions and choices in his/her work. Student/candidate is adaptive, innovative and
creative in his/her line of work, acquires information and analyses, assesses and ap-
plies it.
14
OBJECTIVES AND STRUCTURE OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY
1
Interaction and cooperation
The student or candidate acts appropriately in different interactive situations and
also expresses different views clearly, constructively and in a way that creates confi-
dence. He/she works cooperatively with different people and as a member of a team
and also treats all people equally. He/she observes common rules of behaviour and
regulations. He/she makes use of the feedback given.
Vocational ethics
The student or candidate observes the value basis of the profession. He/she is com-
mitted to his/her work and acts responsibly following the contracts made and work
ethics.
Health, safety and ability to function
The student or candidate acts safely and responsibly at work and leisure as well as
in traffic and also leads a healthy life and maintains his/her ability to function and
work. He/she works ergonomically and takes physical exercise needed in the profes-
sion and also acts in a manner that prevents the dangers and health hazards in the
working environment.
Initiative and entrepreneurship
The student or candidate works towards completing the objectives set. He/she takes
initiative and acts in a customer-oriented way as an employer and/or entrepreneur.
He/she plans activities and works to reach the objectives set. He/she acts economi-
cally and is result-orientated. He/she sets personal goals in line with the overall
objectives.
Sustainable development
The student or candidate acts according to ecological, economical, social and cul-
tural principles sustainable development in the profession. He/She observes the
rules, regulations and contracts of sustainable development prevailing in the sector.
Aesthetics
The student or candidate takes into consideration the aesthetic factors in his/her
line of work. He/she contributes to and maintains the niceness and aesthetics of the
working environment.
15
Communications and media skills
The student or candidate uses his/her language skills in a way that is appropriate,
varied and interactive considering the situation. Student/candidate observes, inter-
prets and assesses different media products critically. He/she uses the media and
information technology as well as produces media material.
Mathematics and natural sciences
The student or candidate uses basic mathematics to solve mathematic equations at
work and in everyday life. He/she uses for example formulas, graphs, patterns and
statistics to help solve work related assignments and problems. Student/candidate
applies methods and practices that are based on the laws of physics and chemistry
at work.
Technology and information technology
The student or candidate makes versatile use of technologies used in his/her pro-
fession. He/she considers the technological benefits, limitations and risks. He/she
makes versatile use of computer technology as a professional and a citizen.
Active citizenship and different cultures
The student or candidate participates constructively in the activities and decision
making of the community. He/she acts according to his/her rights and responsibili-
ties both at work and in everyday life. He observes the acts on equality. He/she acts
appropriately and considering the requirements of working life with people from
different cultural backgrounds both at home and in international operations.
1.4 ELIGIBILITY FOR FURTHER STUDIES
According to Paragraph 4 of the Vocational Education and Training Act, vocational
upper secondary studies grant the student eligibility to further his/her studies in
universities or universities of applied sciences.
16
2.1 DESIGN AND CONTENTS OF THE CURRICULUM
According to the Vocational Education and Training Act (630/1998, section 14)
the education provider must endorse for its training a curriculum that is based on
the qualification requirements mentioned in this document. It must contain the
procedures that ensure that the education reaches the tasks and objectives (Act
630/1998, section 5). A curriculum must be approved separately for education pro-
vided in Finnish, Swedish and Saami and also for education in any other language
when necessary. The curriculum of an education provider is a public document.
The curriculum regulates and directs the education offered by the provider and all
other activities closely related to it. To give the student protection under the law,
the curriculum must provide adequate information about the modules and studies
included in the qualification, assessment and arrangements concerning completion
of the studies. The curriculum must be compiled so that it enables the students to
individually select vocational studies as well as to complete general upper secondary
studies and the matriculation examination. The curriculum also acts as a basis for
internal and external evaluation and also allows evaluating the effectiveness of the
education offered by the education provider.
The education provider reserves the recourses needed for the education. The
education provider also sees that the curriculum allows the student to achieve the
objectives set for the qualification, to receive enough teaching and counselling he/
she needs regardless of the way the education is organized on each workday, also
during on-the-job learning and skills demonstrations.
The curriculum consists of the common part for all the fields of vocational
education and training and qualification specific part of the curriculum.
IMPLEMENTATION OF NATIONAL REQUIREMENTS IN
CURRICULUM-BASED VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND
TRAINING
2
17
2.1.1 Common part of the curriculum
The common principles and procedures for all the upper secondary qualifications
and core values of the education provider are defined in the common part of the
curriculum.
The common part of the curriculum consists of at least
providing education and training as curriculum-based vocational education Š
and training, as training arranged at a workplace in connection with practical
work assignments and as apprenticeship training (Act 630/1998, sections 3,
15 and 17)
arranging education and training as contact teaching, distance, multi-modal Š
(Act 630/1998, sections15) and e-learning
plans and methods for completing a module or modules as well as students’ Š
opportunities to add on to their studies and complete the whole qualification
providing education in cooperation with other education providers and work- Š
ing life (Act 630/1998, sections 14 and 10)
teaching related measures promoting community spirit, which provides an op- Š
portunity for reflecting values and getting to know our cultural heritage (De-
cree 811/1998, sections 9)
common practices on performing student assessment (Act 601/2005, section Š
25a) in accordance with Chapter 7
compliance with the regulations of Chapter 8 Š
staff development plan. Š
The education provider must include plans on how to promote equality, non-dis-
crimination and sustainable development in the curriculum. When organising the
education the education provider must also take into account the obligations in
other statutes concerning education and training.
2.1.2 Qualification specific part of the curriculum
The qualification specific part of the curriculum determines the organisation of the
vocational qualification modules and the core subjects, in cooperation with other
education providers and working life. It also determines the timing of the education,
learning environments and teaching methods, with the help of which the student
can achieve the vocational skills requirements and objectives of the qualification.
18
IMPLEMENTATION OF NATIONAL REQUIREMENTS IN CURRICULUM-BASED VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING
2
The qualification specific part also lists the studies the training provider offers
from other qualifications as well as the student’s opportunities to complete more
than one qualification. It includes the decision on the assessment plan for the voca-
tional modules and core subjects, which is to include skills demonstrations and other
assessment of competence.
Qualification specific part of the curriculum is to cover at least
structure of the qualification of compulsory and optional vocational modules Š
and core subjects
progression, timing and sequence of studies Š
provision of free choice modules Š
a plan on the provision of individual in-depth vocational modules (modules Š
enhancing a vocational upper secondary qualification)
a plan on assessment of the modules and methods used for assessment of com- Š
petence
a plan on assessing vocational modules in a way that it includes a plan on Š
implementation and assessment of skills demonstrations approved by the local
board for vocational skills demonstrations
locally offered modules, their skills requirements, targets of assessment and Š
criteria as well as the objectives, targets of assessment and assessment criteria
for the additional optional modules of compulsory core subjects.
2.1.3 Individual study plan
Vocational Education and Training Act (Act 630/1998, section 14) contains the
provision of a student’s right to make individual choices in his/her studies. Voca-
tional Education and Training Decree (Decree 811/1998, sections 3, 4 and 12a)
contains the provision of how to inform students of the training offered, of student
counselling and recognition and validation of prior skills. In order that a student’s
right to make individual choices is possible, the education provider must prepare
the student an individual study plan based on his/her individual starting point and
update it throughout the training offered.
19
3.1 GENERAL ON COMPETENCE-BASED QUALIFICATION SYSTEM
The competence-based qualification system offers adults a flexible way of demon-
strating, renewing and maintaining their vocational competence, or when duties
change, qualifying for a new profession. In a competence-based qualification a per-
son’s vocational competence can be nationally and quality-wise acknowledged de-
spite whether the skills have been acquired through working experience, studies or
other activities. In the competence-based qualification system the employer side,
employee side and the training sector work in close cooperation when developing
the qualification structure, drawing up qualification requirements, planning and ar-
ranging competence tests as well as when assessing test performances.
Vocational qualifications, further and specialist vocational qualifications can be
completed as competence-based qualifications. The Requirements of competence-
based qualifications describe vocational skills as working life competence require-
ments. The qualifications are made up of modules, which are independent work
entities.
3.2 ARRANGING COMPETENCE-BASED QUALIFICATIONS
The qualification committees appointed by the National Board of Education and
comprising the representatives of employers, employees, teachers and when nec-
essary self-employed persons, are responsible for arranging and controlling com-
petence-based qualifications and they award qualification certificates. The quali-
fication committees sign contracts on arranging competence-based qualifications
with education providers and when necessary other communities and foundations.
Competence-based qualifications must not be arranged without a valid contract
with the qualification committee concerned.
COMPLETING A VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION AS
A COMPETENCE-BASED QUALIFICATION
3
20
COMPLETING A VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION AS A COMPETENCE-BASED QUALIFICATION
3
3.3 COMPLETING A COMPETENCE-BASED QUALIFICATION
A competence-based qualification is completed by successfully demonstrating the
skills required in practical work assignments and activities in a competence test.
Each module must be assessed separately. Assessment is jointly carried out by rep-
resentatives of employers, employees and the training sector. In vocational fields
where self-employment is typical, this party is also to be considered when appoint-
ing assessors. The qualification committee passes the final decision on assessment. A
qualification certificate can be awarded when all the modules required to make up
the qualification have been completed successfully.
3.4 REQUIREMENTS OF COMPETENCE-BASED QUALIFICATIONS
The Requirements of competence-based qualifications define the modules to be in-
cluded in the qualification and possibly the structure of specialisation, qualification
contents, vocational skills required in each module, bases of assessment (targets and
criteria of assessment) as well as ways of demonstrating vocational competence.
A module is a vocational sub-entity, which can be discerned as a separately as-
sessed entity in a natural work process. The vocational skills requirements defined
in modules focus on profession specific key activities, control of processes and vo-
cational practices relevant in the field concerned. They include the skills commonly
required in working life, social skills for example.
Targets of assessment and criteria are derived from the vocational skills require-
ments. Targets of assessment define the sectors of competence that special attention
will be paid to. Defining the targets of assessment also make it easier to assess vo-
cational competence in the work activity concerned. Assessment must cover all the
targets listed in the Requirements of competence-based qualifications. Assessment
criteria determine the quality and quantity levels for a successful performance.
The ways of demonstrating vocational skills include further instructions on
how to complete a qualification. The vocational skills are, in the main, demon-
strated in actual work assignments or tasks. The ways of demonstrating vocational
skills may also include, for example, instructions on how a test performance can be
supplemented, if necessary, in order for all the skills requirements to have been suc-
cessfully met.
21
3.5 INDIVIDUALISATION IN COMPETENCE-BASED QUALIFICATIONS
Education provider is responsible for individualising the enrolment for a compe-
tence-based qualification and for preparatory training, completing the qualification
as well as the acquisition of the vocational skills required. The National Board of
Education has issued a separate regulation on individualisation.
3.6 ASSESSMENT OF VOCATIONAL SKILLS IN A COMPETENCE-BASED
QUALIFICATION
The assessment of vocational skills must profoundly and carefully look into how the
qualification candidate has shown that he/she masters what the skills requirements
of the module concerned prescribe. The assessment criteria defined in the require-
ments for the competence-based qualification are to be used. In assessment, a variety
of different and primarily qualitative assessment methods should be used. Using one
method only does not necessarily yield a reliable result. Vocational field and qualifi-
cation specific special features are taken into consideration in the assessment process
in accordance with the qualification requirements.
If a person completing a qualification has reliable evidence of competence
demonstrated earlier, the assessors assess its correspondence with the skills require-
ments described in the requirements for the competence-based qualification. The
assessors suggest the document to the qualification committee for recognition as
part of a competence-based qualification. If the candidate has earlier demonstrated
his/her skills in one of the modules of this qualification either in curriculum-based
education or in a competence-based qualification, the earlier completed qualifica-
tion or its module must be presented for recognition as part of the competence-
based qualification to be completed. There is no general time limit to be set for
the skills acquired and demonstrated earlier but the validity of such skills can be
verified. The qualification committee makes the final decision on the recognition
of earlier demonstrated and reliably documented skills. If necessary, the candidate
must demonstrate the correspondence of his/her skills with the skills requirements
of the qualification in question.
Assessing vocational skills is a process where collecting assessment material and
documenting the assessment process are of key importance. The representatives of
working life and teachers carry out a careful and comprehensive tri-partite assess-
ment. Every person completing a qualification must learn the assessment criteria.
The candidate must be given an opportunity to self-assess his/her performance. The
provider of a competence-based qualification must draw up minutes of the assess-
22
COMPLETING A VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION AS A COMPETENCE-BASED QUALIFICATION
3
ment of the module, which must be signed by the assessors. The candidate is given
feedback as part of a good assessment process. The qualification committee makes
the final decision on assessment.
Assessors
The persons assessing the qualification candidate’s vocational skills are to have good
vocational skills themselves in the area of the competence-based qualification in
question. The qualification committee and the provider of the competence-based
qualification agree on the assessors in the contract for arranging competence-based
qualifications.
Rectification of assessment
A person completing a qualification can, within the time limit specified by law, re-
quest rectification of assessment from the qualification committee whose sector the
qualification in question falls in. A written request of rectification is addressed to
the qualification committee. Having heard the assessors, the committee can oblige
them to carry out a reassessment. A qualification committee decision on a claim for
rectification of assessment cannot be appealed.
3.7 CERTIFICATES
Qualification committee awards a qualification certificate or a certificate on com-
pletion of a module or modules. A representative of the education provider issues a
certificate on completed preparatory training respectively. ¨The National Board of
Education has issued a regulation on the information to be included in the certifi-
cates.
A certificate on the completion of a qualification module or modules is award-
ed at the request of a person completing a competence-based qualification. The
representatives of the qualification committee and the education provider sign the
qualification certificate or a certificate given after the completion of a module or
modules.
An entry in the Certificate of Vocational Skills approved by the National
Board of Education in proof of completion of a competence-based qualification
is comparable to a qualification certificate. The provider of the competence-based
qualification acquires and signs the Certificate of Vocational Skills. A Certificate of
Vocational Skills is subject to a fee.
23
3.8 PREPARATORY TRAINING FOR COMPETENCE-BASED QUALIFICATIONS
In the case of a competence-based qualification no preconditions to attend prepara-
tory training can be set. However, these qualifications are primarily taken in con-
nection with such preparatory training. The education provider decides on the con-
tents and arrangement of preparatory training for competence-based qualifications
in compliance with the qualification requirements. The training and tests must be
structured according to the qualification modules to be completed. A person attend-
ing such preparatory training must be provided an opportunity to participate in
competence tests and complete the qualification as part of the training.
24
4.1 COMPULSORY MODULES FOR ALL
4.1.1 Fundamental skills in electrical engineering and automation technology,
30 cr
Vocational skills requirements
Basic computer use and data management, mastering computer commissioning
The student or candidate
is able to prepare a job application and written accounts for practical work, or Š
for device and system use instructions, also utilising images and tables
is able to use plug-in software to report on his or her work performance, to pre- Š
pare electrical component lists and to supplement or modify electrical draw-
ings
is able to use a computer as a means of communication and as an aid in infor- Š
mation search
is able to consider information safety-related issues while using data net- Š
works.
Fundamental skills in electrical engineering and electronics
The student or candidate
knows the basic electrical magnitudes and their physical bases and interde- Š
pendencies, such as Ohm’s law and Kirchhoff ’s laws.
knows how to measure currents and voltages on series, parallel and combined Š
couplings of resistors
knows the calculation of basic magnitudes and is able to build couplings in ac- Š
cordance with the calculations; is able to use handle magnitudes as phenomena
relating to physics.
knows how to use the multimeter, clip-on current meter and voltage tester Š
while taking basic measurements
VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS
AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY
4
25
is able to use the oscilloscope to measure current and voltage on direct current Š
and alternating current circuits
is able to take measurements and discover the effect of various components, Š
such as a resistor, a coil, a capacitor, a diode and an electric couple, on the
operation of direct and alternating circuits.
is able to state the effect of magnetism to the operation of electrical appliances, Š
such as a generator, an engine, a relay and a transformer
is able to prepare circuit diagrams for basic couplings in accordance with stand- Š
ardised presentation methods
is able to define the intake electrical power of 1 and 3-phased circuits based on Š
the measurement results of voltage, current and phase-difference angle
knows the features of analogue and digital basic components and related basic Š
couplings. The analogue basic couplings that must be mastered are half-wave
and full-wave rectifications, the voltage regulator and the use of a transistor as
a switch. With regard to digital basic components, the use of gate circuits and
flip-flop circuits must be mastered.
masters the mechanical construction of basic couplings and is able to fasten Š
and unfasten components to a circuit board by soldering as well as to connect
and disconnect wires to connectors taking into account ESD shielding (electro
static discharge).
is able to measure signals relating to basic analogue and digital couplings using Š
common measuring devices, and knows how to interpret the measurement
results obtained.
is able to determine the operation of couplings based on ready-made circuit Š
diagrams.
Use of hand tools; wood work, metal work and plastic work in electrical engineering
The student or candidate
knows how to select the right tools and use them correctly. Š
knows how to maintain hand tools used and keep them operational. Š
is able to use tools without damaging them, the target worked on, him/herself Š
or others.
is able to select appropriate utensils and tools when fastening devices on vari- Š
ous types of surfaces.
is able to prepare simple shield and fastening utensils of wood, metals or plas- Š
tics.
is able to select and use appropriate raw materials in his/her work, process Š
them and follow instructions on their handling.
26
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VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
is able to join pieces of steel together by welding or by screw joint by appropri- Š
ately using machine and sheet screws as well as spindle rivets.
is able to join pieces of wood together by nail or screw joints or by gluing. Š
is able to select the means of fastening based on the features of the structure to Š
be fastened and the location of fastening so as to make a reliable fastening.
is able to interpret mechanical drawings, such as manufacture and assembly Š
drawings
is able to draw manually or by using a computer and one of the design soft- Š
wares the required depictions of a simple piece, including dimensions and
scale.
is able to measure, scale and select the most appropriate measuring tool for Š
each target
Mastering working safety, electrical safety and electrical installation safety
The student or candidate
completes successfully a hot work course in line with the requirements set by Š
the Finnish National Rescue Association (SPEK).
completes successfully an occupational safety course in line with the require- Š
ments set by The Centre for Occupational Safety (TTK).
completes successfully a first aid course designed for electrical engineering pro- Š
fessionals, in line with the Finnish SFS 6002 standard for safety at electrical
work.
completes successfully a training on general safety at electrical work in line Š
with the Finnish SFS 6002 standard for safety at electrical work
is familiar with the requirements set by enactments concerning electrical safety Š
(Act on Electrical Safety, Decree on Electrical Safety, decisions and decrees of
ministries), instructions by the electrical safety authority (Tukes) and the Finn-
ish SFS 6002 standard for safety at electrical work
is familiar with the key information sources in the field and is able to use them Š
to find work-related requirements based on given target information
is able to use his/her identity card in accordance with the YSE 98 agreement Š
on building works
is able to use appropriate work clothing so as not to cause hazards Š
VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
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VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
Knowledge of and using electrical installation materials
The student or candidate
is able to conduct final circuit-level electrical installation work, such as basic Š
lighting coupling, and is able to conduct dead commissioning inspections on
his/her own installations and document them. When installing, the student is
able to select appropriate armature, cables, fastenings and connectors for the
purpose of use
when selecting utensils, is able to act taking the environment into considera- Š
tion and effectively in terms of materials and energy
when preparing lists of utensils, is able to make use of information sources Š
such as the list of electrical product numbers and titles maintained by the
Finnish Electrical Wholesalers´ Federation (SSTL) and use these titles when
discussing with professionals in the field
in electrical installation work, is able to fix various components on building Š
materials (such as wood, tile, concrete, building boards)
knows wire conduits used in electrical engineering and is able to install related Š
cables and armature
is able to select suitable materials for electrical installations in various spaces Š
based on the markings on the devices and taking into consideration the re-
quirements placed on the electrical devices by the space, such as the enclosure
classes of electrical devices
is able to take the required measurements and make sensory inspections of, for Š
example, enclosure and cable mounting when repairing electrical devices
is able to interpret and prepare electrical drawings, such as installation draw- Š
ings and centre main diagrams
is able to interpret construction drawings needed in electrical engineering. Š
is able to find out where the supplies needed in installation work can be ac- Š
quired
Assessment
The table comprises the cumulative assessment criteria for three levels of compe-
tence together with the targets of assessment. In vocational upper secondary educa-
tion and training, the targets of assessment also constitute the core contents of the
module.
28
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VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
TARGET OF
ASSESSMENT
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
1. Mastering the
work process
Satisfactory 1 Good 2 Excellent 3
The student or candidate
Planning own work;
drawing up plans
under instruction, chooses
the appropriate working
method and tools to attain
acceptable results
chooses the appropriate
working method and tools
to attain acceptable results
chooses the most suitable
working methods and tools
to attain economical and
high-quality results
needs guidance to grasp the
next work phase
copes with work tasks inde-
pendently
copes with work tasks flu-
ently, anticipates and takes
into consideration the fol-
lowing work phases, takes
initiative and works inde-
pendently
Efficient and eco-
nomical work (entre-
preneurship)
under instruction, works
according to the quality
objectives set
works according to the
quality objectives set
develops his/her activities
in order to fulfil the quality
objectives
assesses his/her own work
under supervision
assesses his/her own work assesses his/her own work
based on the quality re-
quirements
avoids unnecessary loss
while working
aims at cost- and material
efficiency while working
works efficiently in terms of
cost and materials
TARGET OF
ASSESSMENT
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
2. Mastering the
work method,
equipment and
material
Satisfactory 1 Good 2 Excellent 3
The student or candidate
Mastering the work
method
works using his/her work-
ing method of choice ac-
cording to instructions
assesses the appropriateness
of his/her working methods
of choice while working
adjusts his/her work in-
dependently to changing
circumstances
Mastering the equip-
ment and material
uses and maintains tools
under instruction
uses and maintains tools
spontaneously according to
instructions
chooses the most suitable
tools, uses them correctly
and maintains the tools
used
chooses and uses utensils
and materials according to
documents and instructions
provided
uses utensils and materials
as their features require.
uses utensils and materials
carefully and economically,
taking into consideration
material and energy ef-
ficiency
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VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
TARGET OF
ASSESSMENT
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
3. Underpinning
knowledge
Satisfactory 1 Good 2 Excellent 3
The student or candidate
Interpretation of
drawings
recognises the key compo-
nents based on electrical
and/or automation designs
and diagrams
finds the various compo-
nents in electrical and/or
automation designs and
diagrams
makes use of electrical and/
or automation designs and
diagrams in his/her work
Possession and appli-
cation of knowledge
required by the work
under instruction, is able
to acquire and use informa-
tion related to his/her vo-
cational field and present it
understandably both orally
and in writing.
is able to classify, compare
and analyse information
acquired and modify it to
be usable.
is able to assess the correct-
ness and reliability of in-
formation and draw related
conclusions
TARGET OF
ASSESSMENT
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
4. Key competences
for lifelong learning
Satisfactory 1 Good 2 Excellent 3
The student or candidate
Health, safety and
ability to function
maintains a positive at-
titude towards safety at
work and avoids risks while
working
assumes responsibility for
the safety of his/her work
develops his/her work to
be safer
follows the instructions
provided on work safety;
does not cause danger to
him/herself
follows the instructions of
the workplace; takes into
account other people at the
workplace in his/her work
notices and identifies the
dangers related to his/her
work and notifies of them
uses protective equipment,
tools and working methods
safely and as instructed
ensures the safety of tools
and materials, removes
faulty tools and takes them
to repair
is able to assess the suitabil-
ity of protectors, tools and
working methods for the
work in question
Learning and problem
solving
needs guidance with solv-
ing the most common
problems
copes with the most com-
mon problems by referring
to course materials and
instruction manuals
copes independently with
unexpected problems
takes initiative while work-
ing and seeks confirmation
for his/her decision from
the instructor if needed
works in an innovative
manner, creating something
new, while taking into con-
sideration the expectations
of others
Interaction and
co-operation
under supervision, works as
a member of a group or as a
partner to a professional
works as an active member
of a group and adapts to
the work community
works in an innovative
manner and fluently adapts
to the work community,
supporting its operations
completes the tasks given
or finds out and informs
why the task has not been
completed
is able to co-operate with
others and with interest
groups
is willing and able to co-
operate with other and with
interest groups
30
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VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
Vocational ethics behaves appropriately and
follows working hours
shows good manners negotiates on possible dis-
crepancies
Ways of demonstrating vocational skills
The student or candidate demonstrates his/her vocational skills by conducting basic
electrotechnical installation work at an electrical or automation installation worksite
or some other location as similar as possible. Work is performed to such an extent
that vocational skills may be deemed to meet the vocational skills requirements.
At minimum, a vocational skills demonstration is to evaluate
mastering the work process as far as basic electrical installations and interpret- Š
ing related drawings are concerned.
mastering the work method, equipment and material as far as basic electrical Š
installations and interpreting related drawings are concerned.
underpinning knowledge Š
for the part of key competences for lifelong learning, the consideration of Š
health, safety and the ability to function, and vocational ethics
If the vocational skills required in the module cannot be demonstrated in a vocational
skills demonstration in full, this is to be supplemented by other types of assessment
of competence such as interviews, assignments and other reliable methods.
When validating a student’s prior learning, the basic assignments of Electronics
and ICT of the Vocational Qualification in Information and Telecommunications
Technology (30 credits) compensate the Fundamental skills in electrical engineer-
ing and automation technology module of the Vocational Qualification in Electrical
Engineering and Automation Technology (30 credits).
VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
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VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
4.1.2 Electrical and automation installations, 20 cr
Vocational skills requirements
ELECTROTECHNICAL INSTALLATIONS
Use and application of working plans in electrical and automation installations
The student or candidate
is able to use installation and maintenance instructions, as well as instructions Š
for use, and understand their importance in the use and lifespan of installation
work, installations and devices.
gathers and stores documents before handing them over to the client after the Š
work is complete.
is able to find out the space classes, enclosure classes of devices and installation Š
locations in the documentation of the installation site
is able to observe the requirements of mechanical and electrical protection Š
when completing installations
is able to determine the scaffolding and hoists needed in the work according to Š
the requirements set in the Occupational Safety and Health Act and to reserve
and use the required tools and shielding equipment in the work.
Piping, wiring and armature
The student or candidate
is able to select the most common installation ducts and cables and knows Š
their structures, permissible tensile strengths, bending radii and installation
temperatures.
is able to install the cable routing defined in electrical and automation draw- Š
ings
is able to install and fasten cables to cable routings according to plans Š
is able to consider economic efficiency and customer service and act cost-effi- Š
ciently while conducting installation work.
is able to install earthing and potential equalizer wiring with related couplings Š
according to their respective plans.
is able to conduct cabling according to the requirements concerning protec- Š
tion against interference
is able to install and couple control and socket armature for lighting in accord- Š
ance with the electrical design, as well as installation-related distribution and
branching boxes and light points.
32
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VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
knows the most common cables and bus cables used in energy input control Š
and monitoring, knows the structures of these cables and is able to install
them.
is able to shield cables taking into account the requirements posed by the in- Š
stallation environment
is able to conduct cable peeling, closing and coupling work as well as cable Š
marking work.
is able to correctly and safely use the tools and special tools needed in instal- Š
lations
Switchboard assembly installations
The student or candidate
is able to install switchgear on various kinds of installation bases and in various Š
types of installation spaces, to implement wiring to switchboards without weak-
ening the enclosure classes, meeting the requirements of mechanical shielding,
and to couple the related leads, wires and cables to the switchboard.
is able to make required additions and modifications to armature according to Š
instructions, and knows the markings relating to switchboard installations.
INDUSTRIAL ASSEMBLIES
Component and cable installations
The student or candidate
knows the components of various types of assembly industries Š
is able to select the most common installation ducts and cables and knows Š
their structures, permissible tensile strengths, bending radii as well as installa-
tion and use temperatures.
is able to install correct armature and materials for cable routing, piping and Š
cables as well as other assembly-related utensils based on assembly, main and
circuit drawings and coupling tables.
is able to install and fasten wires and cables to cable routings according to Š
plans
is able to consider economic efficiency and customer service and maintain Š
cost-awareness while conducting installation work.
is able to measure, peel and install wires related to switchboard and other as- Š
semblies.
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VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
Electric motor relay control and logistics control installations
The student or candidate
is able to prepare main and control current diagrams for 1-speed, 2-speed, Š
reversal, Y/D, software and frequency converter powered motor outputs
is able to install 1-speed, 2-speed, reversal, Y/D, software and frequency con- Š
verter powered motors based on ready-made drawings
is able to use a programmable logic and its programming environment for Š
setting operating parameters for 1-speed, 2-speed, reversal, Y/D, software and
frequency converter powered motors
is able to use and couple limit and proximity switches while conducting the Š
said couplings
knows the operating principle, structure and couplings of a short-circuit mo- Š
tor
is familiar with the mechanical installation and maintenance of motors. Š
knows the principles of overload and short-circuit protection required in mo- Š
tor drives and is able to ensure the appropriateness of the protective devices
and adjust them correctly based on the information on the motor plate and in
written instruction materials
Hydraulic and pneumatic installations
The student or candidate
knows the principles and environmental effects of the production and trans- Š
mission of compressed air.
is familiar with the structures and operating principles of basic components, Š
such as a control valve and a cylinder, as well as their related manners of instal-
lation, adjustment and control.
is able to read hydraulic and pneumatic diagrams Š
is able to conduct installation, start-up, maintenance and reparation work on Š
hydraulic and pneumatic systems.
is able to find out the operational logic of a system based on diagrams. Š
is able to find out the working motion paths, the effects of adjustments, and Š
find reasons behind malfunctions in fault situations by using diagrams, and to
take the required corrective measures
is able to make simple valve-related controls and adjustments, such as a change Š
in flow direction.
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VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
Use and application of publications on electrical safety requirements and quality systems
The student or candidate
is able to find professionally relevant information in statutes (laws, decrees, Š
regulations and decisions of ministries and standards).
is able to interpret and prepare installation, main and circuit drawings Š
is able to interpret assembly drawings and switchboard device lists and to add Š
to them modifications based on potential changes made during work
is able to use publications on valid official regulations and standards (for ex- Š
ample, SFS 6000) and Electrical Safety Regulations 2 to acquire information
required.
knows the purpose and principle of quality systems. Š
is able to act according to electrical safety procedures, such as the instructions Š
published by SETI Oy on the use of vocational training in electrical engineer-
ing
when selecting utensils, is able to act taking the environment into considera- Š
tion and effectively in terms of materials and energy
Verification and commissioning testing of installations
The student or candidate
acknowledges the importance and purpose of verifying one’s own work in elec- Š
trical installations throughout the working process and before delivering the
installation work to the commissioner
is able to conduct a commissioning test in accordance with the SFS 6000 Š
standard
is able to fill out the commissioning records prepared for the work target and Š
add to the installation drawings changes that have taken place during inspec-
tion or work.
is able to provide guidance on the use of finished installations Š
Reparation of small electrical appliances
The student or candidate
is able to maintain and fix the most common electrical tools and electrically Š
operated consumer devices, such as hand tools, electrical sauna stoves, and
stoves
is able to utilise manuals and other assistive material for device reparation Š
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VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
Assessment
The table comprises the cumulative assessment criteria for three levels of compe-
tence together with the targets of assessment. In vocational upper secondary educa-
tion and training, the targets of assessment also constitute the core contents of the
module.
TARGET OF
ASSESSMENT
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
1. Mastering the
work process
Satisfactory 1 Good 2 Excellent 3
The student or candidate
Planning own work;
drawing up plans
under instruction, chooses
the appropriate working
method and tools to attain
acceptable results
chooses the appropriate
working method and tools
to attain acceptable results
chooses the most suitable
working methods and tools
to attain economical and
high-quality results
needs guidance to grasp the
next work phase
copes with work tasks inde-
pendently
copes with work tasks flu-
ently, anticipates and takes
into consideration the fol-
lowing work phases, takes
initiative and works inde-
pendently
Efficient and eco-
nomical work (entre-
preneurship)
under instruction, works
according to the quality
objectives set
works according to the
quality objectives set
develops his/her activities
in order to fulfil the quality
objectives
assesses his/her own work
under supervision
assesses his/her own work assesses his/her own work
based on the quality re-
quirements
avoids unnecessary loss
while working
aims at cost- and material
efficiency while working
works efficiently in terms of
cost and materials
TARGET OF
ASSESSMENT
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
2. Mastering the
work method,
equipment and
material
Satisfactory 1 Good 2 Excellent 3
The student or candidate
Mastering the work
method
works using his/her work-
ing method of choice ac-
cording to instructions
assesses the appropriateness
of his/her working methods
of choice while working
adjusts his/her work in-
dependently to changing
circumstances
Mastering the equip-
ment and material
uses and maintains tools
under instruction
uses and maintains tools
spontaneously according to
instructions
chooses the most suitable
tools, uses them correctly
and maintains the tools
used
chooses and uses utensils
and materials according to
documents and instructions
provided
uses utensils and materials
as their features require.
uses utensils and materials
carefully and economically,
taking material and energy
efficiency into consider-
ation
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VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
TARGET OF
ASSESSMENT
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
3. Underpinning
knowledge
Satisfactory 1 Good 2 Excellent 3
The student or candidate
Interpretation of
drawings
recognises the key compo-
nents based on electrical
and/or automation designs
and diagrams
finds the various compo-
nents in electrical and/or
automation designs and
diagrams
makes use of electrical and/
or automation designs and
diagrams in his/her work
Possession and appli-
cation of knowledge
required by the work
under instruction, is able
to acquire and use informa-
tion related to his/her vo-
cational field and present it
understandably both orally
and in writing
is able to classify, compare
and analyse information
acquired and modify it to
be usable
is able to assess the correct-
ness and reliability of in-
formation and draw related
conclusions
TARGET OF
ASSESSMENT
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
4. Key competences
for lifelong learning
Satisfactory 1 Good 2 Excellent 3
The student or candidate
Health, safety and
ability to function
maintains a positive at-
titude towards safety at
work and avoids risks while
working
assumes responsibility for
the safety of his/her work
develops his/her work to
be safer
follows the instructions
provided on work safety;
does not cause danger to
him/herself
follows the instructions of
the workplace; takes into
account other people at the
workplace in his/her work
notices and identifies the
dangers related to his/her
work and notifies of them
uses protective equipment,
tools and working methods
safely and as instructed
ensures the safety of tools
and materials, removes
faulty tools and takes them
to repair
is able to assess the suitabil-
ity of protectors, tools and
working methods for the
work in question
Learning and problem
solving
needs guidance with solv-
ing the most common
problems
copes with the most com-
mon problems by referring
to course materials and
instruction manuals.
copes independently with
unexpected problems.
takes initiative while work-
ing and seeks confirmation
for his/her decision from
the instructor if needed
works in an innovative
manner, creating something
new, while taking into con-
sideration the expectations
of others
Interaction and
co-operation
under supervision, works as
a member of a group or as a
partner to a professional.
works as an active member
of a group and adapts to
the work community
works in an innovative
manner and fluently adapts
to the work community,
supporting its operations
completes the tasks given
or finds out and informs
why the task has not been
completed
is able to co-operate with
others and with interest
groups
is willing and able to co-
operate with other and with
interest groups
VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
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VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
Vocational ethics behaves appropriately and
follows working hours
shows good manners negotiates on possible dis-
crepancies.
Ways of demonstrating vocational skills

The student or candidate demonstrates his/her vocational skills in the focal com-
petences in electrical and automation installations by conducting basic electrical
engineering and automation technology installations in an electrical or automation
installation position or in an industrial assembly-related position, according to the
orientation of the on-the-job learning position, or in some other position as similar
as possible.
Work is performed to such an extent that vocational skills may be deemed to
meet the vocational skills requirements.
At minimum, a vocational skills demonstration is to evaluate
mastering the work process as a whole Š
for the part of mastering the work method, equipment and material, mastering Š
fundamental work methods
underpinning knowledge as a whole Š
for the part of key competences for lifelong learning, the consideration of Š
health, safety and the ability to function, and vocational ethics.
If the vocational skills required in the module cannot be shown in a vocational skills
demonstration in full, this is to be supplemented by some other type of assessment
of competence, such interviews, assignments and other reliable methods.
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VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
4.2 STUDY PROGRAMME IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND
AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY, ELECTRICIAN
4.2.1 Electrical engineering and energy technology, 20 cr
Electricity production and transmission
The student or candidate
knows how electricity production has been implemented in Finland and what Š
types of power plants are being used
is familiar with the principle of national electricity distribution and the various Š
transmission and distribution voltages
is familiar with the main components used in the transmission and distribu- Š
tion networks of electricity
is able to find out how electricity is transmitted from a power plant to consum- Š
ers
Mastering and use of electrical drawings, electrical specifications, installation manuals and user’s manu-
als
The student or candidate
is familiar with the most common graphic symbols used in the electrical instal- Š
lations of various buildings
is able to read electrical drawings well enough to conduct the work independ- Š
ently or under some instruction
is able to read and apply electrical specifications Š
is able to read system-specific instructions and act accordingly Š
is able to interpret layout drawings, system charts, device lists and electrical Š
specifications and to make modifications to them based on potential changes
taking place during work
is able to prepare a working plan for a small-scale target, based on which the Š
work can be completed.
is able to use the correct graphic symbols when modifying electrical drawings Š
is able to read installation instructions and use them to install and connect Š
electrical devices of various systems to the network
is able to provide use guidance to the client with the help of user’s manuals Š
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VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
Competence in lighting technology, and lighting installations
The student or candidate
of the basics of lighting technology, is familiar with light intensity Š
is familiar with the most common light sources, their colour temperatures, Š
colour shades and connection devices
is familiar with various lighting structures and is able to select appropriate light Š
sources for structures
is aware of the importance of energy saving in the planning and installation Š
of lighting
is able to correctly install various surface and recess mounted luminaires with Š
the help of manufacturer’s instructions and take into consideration the instal-
lation position and enclosure class of the luminaire in accordance with the
requirements of space classes
is able to consider the requirements set on the maintenance of luminaires Š
is able to install the components controlling lighting, such as switches and Š
push buttons
Electrical heating installations
The student or candidate
is familiar with the operating principles of various forms of electrical heating Š
and the items in the installation standard relating to electrical heating instal-
lations
is able to identify a fire hazard caused by electrical heating and, based on that, Š
assess the appropriateness of the heater for the location in question
is able to use manufacturer’s instructions to install, for example, radiator heat- Š
ing, underfloor heating, ceiling heating, trace heating, anti-freeze heating, elec-
tric boilers and electric resistance-heated hot-water tanks
is able to determine the power requirement of electrical heating for a small Š
space and select an appropriate heating solution
is able to install heat regulation systems for various types of heating Š
understands the effect of decrease in temperature on energy saving. Š
Device installations
The student or candidate
is able to read all essential information on the name plate or installation in- Š
structions of an electrical device and use it to conclude the appropriateness of
the device for the installation location in question
is able to determine final circuit wires and protective devices for low-power Š
devices based on device power.
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VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
is able to install required protective devices for various devices, such as a safety Š
switch, emergency stop etc.
is able to prepare typical wire conduits in device installations and install wires Š
in an aesthetically appropriate manner
is familiar with the various enclosure classes and is able to use appropriate seals Š
in cable lead-ins.
Switchboard assembly installations and measuring instruments
The student or candidate
is familiar with, and able to consider, the requirements of the valid standard on Š
switchboard assemblies in his/her installation work concerning the structure
and location of switchboard assemblies and coupling wires to them
is familiar with the various switchboard assembly structures, such as grid, box Š
and cell assemblies
is able to complete wire and cable lead-ins without affecting the enclosure class Š
negatively
is able to complete additional cut-outs on the assembly cover, installation pan- Š
els etc. for components to be added, using the correct tools
is able to add the required components inside the assembly according to man- Š
ufacturer’s installation instructions
is able to conduct neat wiring inside assemblies by using the correct wire Š
routes.
is able to couple wires and cables to the assembly using the correct tools and Š
methods
is able to install cables for controlling electrical heating in detached houses, Š
semi-detached houses and terrace houses and to couple these cables to the as-
sembly
is able to install direct and indirect measuring connections to the assembly Š
knows the conversion ratios and accuracy classes of current transformers Š
is able to make the markings of assembly components equivalent with the Š
installation and make any necessary corrections to the drawings.
Site operations, and general terms and conditions of contracts
The student or candidate
is familiar with the electrical contracting-related working and electrical instal- Š
lation safety organisation at the site
is familiar with the tasks of an electrician, a work group organiser and a project Š
manager in electrification projects
VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
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VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
is aware of the other contract workers at the site, including the main contractor Š
and various subcontractors, such as HPAC contractors
knows his/her own role at the site and, when needed, seeks advice as instruct- Š
ed
in his/her social behaviour, takes into account the requirements and needs of Š
other contractors
is able to act appropriately and in a conciliatory manner when dealing with Š
representatives of other contractors
is aware of the significance of site sanitation to working safety and is able to Š
follow the requirements of the main contractor
to an appropriate extent, knows the content of YSE 98 (General conditions for Š
building contracts) and is able to act in line with its requirements
Fault detection and maintenance
The student or candidate
recognises a faulty part in an electrical device or installation and is able to no- Š
tify of it following the valid procedure of notice
is able to inform the client about a faulty electrical device or installation and Š
propose a suggestion to repair it
is able to perceive the nature of the fault and use that information to select a Š
fault detection method
is able to apply what he/she learned during Fundamentals of electrical technol- Š
ogy and to think logically when troubleshooting
is able to use the correct measuring equipment in troubleshooting and use it to Š
measure safely according to the user’s manual of the measuring equipment
is able to interpret the measurement results and use them to conclude the con- Š
dition of the electrical device or installation
is able to disconnect a part of an electrical device or installation reliably from Š
the electrical network for reparation or maintenance and is able to notify the
relevant parties
is familiar with the safety requirements for maintenance work Š
is familiar with the maintenance instructions for electrical building technology Š
and is able to use them to interpret the maintenance intervals set on electrical
devices
is able to service an electrical device by using the correct working methods, Š
tools, utensils and substances
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VOCATIONAL MODULES, VOCATIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THE VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION
System tests and trials, work delivery and use guidance
The student or candidate
is familiar with the commissioning work relating to electrical equipment he/ Š
she has installed and is aware of the significance of commissioning to success-
ful work
is able to test the functionality of various systems Š
is able to explain how the electrical equipment he/she has installed is used and Š
to provide use guidance to the client
Property electrical installations
The student or candidate
is able to install typical wire conduits used in electrical installations, such as Š
cable trays, luminaire mounting rails, wire ducts, wire chutes and electrical
mouldings
is able to complete EMC protection-compliant wiring and cable installations Š
and is aware of the significance of EMC protection in wiring and cabling
is familiar with the typical solutions concerning EMC protection implementa- Š
tion for various wire conduits and is able to conduct the installations accord-
ingly
is familiar with the various pipe and wire types that are used widely