Bryce Hennefer, Assignment 3x - Bryce R. Hennefer

hollandmarigoldOil and Offshore

Nov 8, 2013 (3 years and 11 months ago)

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Hennefer,
1


Bryce Hennefer

Mr. Sorenson

English 1010

4/12/2012

Offshore Oil Drilling

Drilling for oil does not always take place on land. Drilling for oil can also take place on
the ocean floor. Offshore oil drilling

is a very controversial issue.

Drilling in the ocean can have
some harsh consequences, but it is something that needs to be done.

With the millions of cars
in the United States that need fuel, drilling offshore is a necessity.
It creates a lot of jobs that
are very important to America
ns in tough economic times.
Offshore oil drilling is a necessity
because it creates revenue f
or state and federal government, which

helps national debt,

creates jobs,

and is an important source of our nation’s oil.

There are many people that are against dr
illing offshore. There are some valid points
that support their argument. Accidents happen when offshore drilling and some have greater
consequences then others. On April 20, 2010 there was a massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.
The massive oil compan
y BP

was drilling in the Gulf of Mexico when their oil rig exploded
causing

11 workers (Magner,
2
)
.
There are some

other

big consequences as a result of this oil
spill.

The accident

dumped around 200 million gallons

of oil

into the ocean and an unknown
amo
unt of natural gas into the atmosphere

(3)
. This is the biggest oil spill in the history of the
United States. We are still feeling the effects of the spill with cleanup efforts
that
are still
happening on 650 miles of beaches.
BP is facing
over 350 differ
ent law suits (4)
. This spill has
Hennefer,
2


been a very expensive accident. The spill
has
also harmed

marine life. Obviously the oil is toxic
for the marine life causing them to die. Birds become so soaked with oil that they cannot fly.

Despite the risks that offsho
re drilling poses, it is important be able to do it.
Offshore oil
drilling is a

big
source of revenue.
The money made is very important for state

and federal
government
s
. Oil companies are required to pay lease fees in order to drill for oil in federal
wat
ers.
The revenue made from oil drilling fees he
lps slow down the national debt;

which has
exceeded
15.6 trillion dollars and is growing rapidly. The lease fees paid by oil companies in
order to drill in federal waters go directly to the United States
Treasury. Over the past decade
these fees add
ed

up to around 76.7 billion dollars

(Davenport,
“Coastal.
”, 3
).
Some states
desperately need the money that is made from offshore drilling. Many people want 30 to 40
percent of the revenue to be distributed to
the coastal states, but only to the states that
support

offshore drilling

(4)
. In 2006, a petition requesting 37.5 percent of revenue to be
distributed to Gulf Coastal states was passed easily. Because of all of the money that can be
made legislature canno
t resist
.

The main recipient of this money would be Louisiana to help
restore the state after

the disaster of Hurricane

Katrina

(6)
.
Louisiana is still dependent on the
revenue from oil. If offshore drilling was to stop it would affect them greatly.

Offsh
ore drilling is important for our economy. Governments make a lot of money just
off fees that allow oil companies to drill. There is also money being made off the selling of oil.
With gas prices being over three dollars you can bet that these companies are

bringing in a lot
of money.

Offshore drillin
g also creates a lot of jobs. In

tough economic times job creation is
very important. Davenport says, “
T
hey

(experts)

estimate that at least 20 percent of the jobs in
Louisiana are related to or supported by the

offshore drilling industry


(Davenport,
Hennefer,
3


“Louisiana
.

, 12
)
. If we were to put a stop to offshore drilling a lot of people would be out of
jobs.

The oil gained from offshore drilling is an important source of our nation’s oil. Putting an
end to offshore
drilling just isn’t realistic. The reality is that we need oil. It is one of the main
sources of energy. Until an alternative to fueling

for

our cars is discovered, offshore drilling is a
necessity.

There also many other areas where companies can begin to
drill for oil. There are still
chances of accidents, but companies

are learning from their mistakes. They are learning to drill
more safely and not in deep waters like the Gulf of Mexico incident. Despite risks, companies
like Shell are being allowed to dr
ill the Arctic Ocean near northern Alaska. “
The U.S. Geological
Survey estimates that the area holds more than 20 billion barrels of oil
” (“Proceed With Caution
in Alaska”
,
6
).

This can help reliance on foreign oil.

The risks of offshore oil drilling
should not be ignored. There are valid reasons not to do
offshore drilling, but the needs for gasoline outweigh those reasons. Companies will learn ways
to drill more safely and minimize risk. There may be small accidents, but severe accidents a
re
avoidabl
e. Offshore drilling
creates jobs in a struggling economy and is great source of revenue
for
our state and federal governments who desperately need it
. It is not realistic to even
consider putting a stop to offshore drilling as long as our cars run on gaso
line.

In a perfect world
we would be able to stop offshore oil drilling in order to avoid accidents that affect the
environment and animals.

The reality is that we need oil and it is too vital to the economy of
the United States to stop it.



Hennefer,
4


Works

Cited

D
avenport, Coral. "Coastal States Fishing for Share

of Fees From Offshore Drilling

.


National Journal

(2011).

Gale Opposing Viewpoints In Context
. Web. 10 Apr. 2012.


Retrieved from Opposing Viewpoints.

Davenport, C
oral
.


Louisiana Still Dependent on Oil
.”

National

Journal

(2011)
.

Gale

Opposing


Viewpoints

In

Context
. Web. 10 Apr. 2012.

Retrieved from Opposing Viewpoints.

Magner, Mi
ke. "BP Faces Spillover Effects.
"

National Journal

(2011).

Gale Opposing Viewpoints

In Context
. Web. 10 Apr. 2012.

Retrieved
from Opposing Viewpoints.

"Proceed With Caution in Alaska.
"

USA TODA
Y
.

04 Jan 2012:

A.6.

SIRS Issues

Researcher.

Web.

10 Apr 2012.


Retrieved from SIRS Researcher.