3911 Chemistry and Physics of Engineering Materials I is an introduction to the structure and properties of engineering materials, in particular materials, semiconductors, ceramics, glasses and polymers. Topics include a review of atomic bonding, discussion of basic crystalline and amorphous structures, point and line defects, and the role these structural features play in elastic and plastic deformations, yield, fracture, glass transition, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, specific heat and electrical conductivity.

healthyapricotMechanics

Nov 5, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

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1


COURSE
3911

CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS OF MATERIALS I


TERM:
FALL

20
1
3


INSTRUCTOR
-

Anand M. Sharan,
EN
3068, Tel: 8930


E
-
mai
l
:

asharan@mun.ca


LECTURES 2 TO 3:15 P.M. ROOM 2040


TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS

TUTORIALS
: TUE

4
-
4:50 P.M.


OFFICE HOURS FOR CONSULTATIONS
:
11:30 A.M.

T
o

1
:
30

P.M.
TUESDAYS

( EN
-
3068 )


CREDIT VALUE:

3 credits


CALENDAR ENTRY:




3911 Chemistry and Physics of Engineering Materials I
is an introduction

to the structure and properties of engineering

materials, in particular

materials, semiconductors, ceramics, glasses and polymers. Topics include

a review of atomic bonding, discussion of basic crystalline and amorphous

structures, point and line defects, and the role these structural features play

in

elastic and plastic deformations, yield, fracture, glass transition, thermal

conductivity, thermal expansion, specific heat and electrical conductivity.


CR: the former ENGI 2205

LH: at least four 3
-
hour sessions per semester

OR: tutorial 1 hour per week

PR: Chemistry 1050
.


RESOURCES:




Text book



W.D. Callister, Jr., and D.G. Rethwisch, Materials Science and
Engineering: An Introduction (8
th

Edition), John Wiley & Sons, Inc.,
2010, ISBN: 978
-
0
-
470
-
41997
-
7.


REFERENCES



Students are encouraged to make us
e of QEII library, the world
-
wide
-
2


web (www), and internet resources in addition to the textbook to help
learn concepts and write reports.




COURSE CONTENTS


CHAPTERS 1 to 4

; 6, 7 ;
12.1 to 12.
5
; 14. 1 to 14.12
; 18.1 to 18.
12

; 19



( a )
REFER TO

THE

WEB



http://www.engr.mun.ca/~asharan/courses/3911_LECTURES/



FOR LECTURE NOTES (TRANSPARENCIES)


(b) ALWAYS CHECK THE FILE CALLED
NOTICE_BOARD_2012.doc

IN THIS
WEB
DIRECTORY FOR INSTRUCTOR’S MESSAGES TO THE STUDENTS.


MAJOR TOPICS:





Ch1
:
Introduction to Materials Science & Engineering




Ch2
:
Atomic Structure & Interatomic Bonding



Ch
3
:
Th
e Structure of Crystalline Solids



Ch
4
:
Imperfections in Solids



Ch
6
:
Mechanical Properties



Ch
7
:
Deformation & Strengthening Mechanisms



Ch1
2
:
Structures & Properties of Ceramics



Ch14
:
Polymer Structures



Ch1
8
:
Electrical Properties



Ch19
:
Thermal Properties





Laboratories



REFER TO:
http://www.engr.mun.ca/~asharan/courses/3911_LABS/


FOR MORE INFORMATION REGARDING LAB MANUALS




Laboratory 1:
( a ) VERNIERS AND UNCERTAINITIES, ( b )
3


APPLICATION
S OF SEMICONDUCTORS IN THE FIELD OF
ALTERNATE ENERGY



Laboratory 2:
ELASTIC PROPERTIES OF RUBBER



Laboratory 3:
ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE AND RESISTIVITY

Laboratory 4:
THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY


Learning Outcomes for ENGI 3911 Chemistry and Physics of Engineered
Mate
rials I


After completion of this course, the student should be able to perform the
following skills successfully:


1.

Crystallography and Crystal Structures

a.

Identify, draw, and describe the structures of crystalline solids (simple
cubic, BCC, FCC, HCP)

b.

Defin
e what crystal systems are and determine crystallographic
directions and planes

2.


Mechanical Properties of Materials

a.

Define imperfections in solids and their effect on mechanical
properties of materials (impurities, dislocations, grain boundaries)

b.

Define an
d describe stress
-
strain behavior of metals, polymers, and
ceramics

c.

Define the mechanical properties of strength, ductility, hardness,
elasticity, stiffness, plasticity and identify them on a stress
-
strain
curve

d.

Be familiar with experimental testing of ten
sile
-
compressive
-
loading
hardness testing methods (Rockwell, Brinell, Vickers)

3.

Phase Diagrams

a.

Define and describe the features of a binary phase diagram (phases,
compositions, mass fractions, microstructures)

4.

Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of C
eramic Structures

a.

Describe the different crystal structures of ceramics

b.

Describe the characteristic mechanical properties of ceramics

5.

Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of Polymer Structures

a.

Describe the different types of polymers (thermoplastics,
thermosets)

b.

Describe the characteristic mechanical properties of polymers



4


In relation to the Engineering profession, the learning outcomes for the course
are for the students to:




Understand and elaborate upon the role and relevance of materials science
in
Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Civil Engineering,
Ocean/Naval Engineering, and Process Engineering



Show that they are knowledgeable about the fundamental classes of
materials and their structure and properties



Engage in introductory di
scussions about the processing, applications and
performance of the fundamental classes of materials involved in materials
selection and design problems



Use experimental techniques and computational skills, along with critical
thinking, to address and anal
yze material property questions



See the role of materials science in a well
-
rounded Engineering education,
preparing them to contribute effectively as individual professional and as
team members in academia, industry and government



Engage in integrating m
aterials engineering concepts with societal issues of
economics, innovation, technology, ethics, quality of life and human values;



Communicate effectively


orally and in writing


the concepts and results of
materials science and engineering investigation
s to both technical and non
-
technical audiences



Recognize that the field of materials has a deep history and is continually
evolving as new knowledge and materials are developed, requiring
consistent consideration (“lifelong scholarship”)



Develop an awaren
ess of modern materials engineering practice and interest
in current issues in the application of materials



MARKS BREAKDOWN



BETTER OF THE TWO OPTIONS


OPTION 1

OPTION 2

ASSIGNMENT

5

5

LAB

15

15

TEST
(

OCT

2
4
, 20
13

)

TENTATIVE

2
5

30

FINAL

55

5
0

TOTAL

100

100


5


Assignments


5
%

(1
% each)




Assignment 1(Ch2)


Sept 26


Assignment 2(Ch3)


Oct 3


Assignment 3(Ch4)


Oct 10


Assignment 4(Ch6)


Oct
24


Assignment 5(Ch7
)


Oct
31


Labs (4 total)

15%

Due at the end of each Laboratory


Assignments are

submitted individually
( a )
in class

or ( b )
in the General
Office by 4 P.M.
on the due date
. Late assignments will not be marked unless the
student provides a
medical doctors note (sickness).

All labs are required to be
performed and the students are
required to read the lab manual before coming to
the lab. If a student does not participate in a lab then he or she will receive an
incomplete in the course. Lab reports have to be written in the lab itself and handed
in at the end before leaving the lab.
The students have to bring and submit labs in a
lab notebook (one per group). Calculators for midterm and final

exam should be a
simple non
-
programmable. If notes or formulas can be stored on the calculator
then they should be deleted prior to the midterm
or final exam, since this
constitutes an Academic Offence “using unauthorized aids” page 77 of the MUN
2012
-
2013 Calendar.


PLEASE NOTE:



( 1 ) TEST AND FINAL


CLOSED BOOK
;


NO
FORMULA SHEETS
ALLOWED. PROBLEMS TO BE SOLVED
USING FORMULAS GIVEN IN THE

TEST OR FINAL



SIMPLE
CALCULATOR

IS
ALLOWED.



( 2 ) TEST AND FINAL TOGETHER =
80

MARKS , WHICH

WILL HAVE
THEORY QUESTIONS = 65

MARKS
MORE OR LESS,
AND
NUMERICAL PROBLEMS = 15 MARKS
APPROXIMATELY.


(3) NUMERICAL PROBLEMS WILL BE SIMILAR TO ASSIGNMENTS
Q
UESTIONS OR WORKED OUT PROBLEMS IN THE BOOK

OR IN THE
CLASS
.

6



( 4 ) THE TEST OR FINAL

HAS TO BE WRITTEN IN INK WITH A
FONT SIZE APPROXIMATELY EQUAL TO 12 OR GREATER


( 5 ) ANY SKETCHES DRAWN HAVE TO BE CLEAR AND CLEAN.


LABS


( 6

) LAB INSTRUCTIONS CAN BE

DOWNLOADED FROM MY WEB



http://www.engr.mun.ca/~asharan/courses/3911_LABS/


FOR LAB 1, PLEASE DOWNLOAD THE FOLLOWING

FILES

FROM
THE ABOVE WEBSITE :


LabManual2009.doc

05
-
Sep
-
2009 15:35 40K


INSTRUCTIONS_LAB1.pdf

03
-
Sep
-
2009 14:08 691K


CALIP_MICRO_UNCERT_V1.pdf

09
-
Sep
-
2009 14:25 568K


USE_OF
_SEMICONDUCTING_MATERIALS.docx



( 7

) LAB TEACHING ASSISTANTS WILL SHOW
-

HOW TO DO
THE
LABS, AND WILL HELP YOU IN WRITING YOUR

REPORTS.



(
8

) NAME OF EACH STUDENT HAS TO BE WRITTEN IN THE
REPORT.

LAB INSTRUCTORS WILL RECORD THE NAME OF ANY
STUDENT
WHO WILL BE ABSENT


(
9

)

AGAIN,

ALL THE LABS ARE REQUIRED

TO BE PERFORMED
-


TO COMLETE THE COURSE.



(14) TO DOWNLOAD THE LECTURE TRANSPARENCIES


STUDENTS
HAVE TO PURCHASE 7
th
, or 8
th
, or 9
th

EDITION OF THE TEXTBOOK.


7


ACADEMIC INTEGRITY AND PROFESSIONAL

CONDUCT:


Students are expected to conduct themselves in all aspects of the course
at the highest level of academic integrity. Any student found to commit
academic misconduct will be dealt with according to the Faculty and
University practices. More info
rmation is available at
www.engr.mun.ca/undergrad/academicintegrity
.


Students are encouraged to consult the Faculty of Engineering and Applied
Science Student Code of Conduct at
http://www.engr.mun.ca/policies/codeofconduct.php

and Memorial
University’s Code of Student Conduct at
http://www.mun.ca/student/home/conduct.
php
.


LAB SAFETY:




Students are expected to demonstrate awareness of, and personal
accountability for, safe laboratory conduct.


Appropriate personal protective
equipment (PPE) must be worn (e.g. steel
-
toed shoes, safety glasses, etc.)
and safe work pra
ctices must be followed as indicated for individual
laboratories, materials and equipment. Students will immediately report
any concerns regarding safety to the teaching assistant, staff technologist,
and professor.




CSA approved safety shoes and safety

glasses are required in designated
laboratories as per the current safety policy (see Laboratory supervisor: Mr
Haibing Wang, Office EN
-
1020).


INCLUSION AND EQUITY:


Students who require physical or academic accommodations are
encouraged to speak priva
tely to the instructor so that appropriate
arrangements can be made to ensure your full participation in the course.
All conversations will remain confidential.


The university experience is enriched by the diversity of viewpoints, values,
and backgrounds

that each class participant possesses. In order for this
course to encourage as much insightful and comprehensive discussion
8


among class participants as possible, there is an expectation that dialogue
will be collegial and respectful across disciplinary,

cultural, and personal
boundaries.


STUDENT ASSISTANCE:

Student Affairs and Services offers help and
support in a variety of areas, both academic and personal. More
information can be found at
www.mun.ca/student
.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:



In general, students who behave professionally, attend class, perform all of
the components of the course, manage their time on task efficiently, and
study for the major components (midterm, final exams) ahead of schedule
ten
d to perform better than those who do not.