Title: AG-PSB Unit 1: Introduction to Plant Science and Biotechnology

hastinesshandyBiotechnology

Oct 23, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

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Title:

AG
-
PSB Unit 1: Introduction to Plant Science and Biotechnology


Grade:

9,
10, 11, 12


Designers:

Ag Ed
GaDOE



Introduction


Unit Title



AG
-
PSB Unit 1: Introduction to Plant
Science and Biotechnology




Unit Annotations



1.1

In this unit students will define science and
agriscience and demonstrate the scientific
method. Students will list the br
anches of
science.

1.2

In this unit students will explain why
agriculture is an applied science and describe
at least three advances in agriculture resulting
from agricultural research. Students will
describe the historical events related to
agricultural r
esearch and development.
Students will distinguish between basic and
applied research.

1.3

In this unit students will describe the role
plants play in the environment and explain
how plants are used. Students will show
where common cop species originated
and
describe the role of plants in the food chain.
Students will discuss the economic importance
of plant production in Georgia.

1.4

In this unit students will demonstrate proper
use of the compound and dissecting
microscopes and explain the parts and
fun
ctions of the computer. Students will
demonstrate basic computer skills and make
and prepare a wet and dry mount slide.





Grade(s)





9



10



11



12




Subject(s)









(Optional) Approximate Duration of
Unit



7 hours




(optional) Additional Author(s) and
their Email Address(es)







Unit Focus Standards



Unit Focus Standards



AG
-
PSB
-
1: The student define
s,
explains, and demonstrates the
importance of plant science,
agriscience and biotechnology in
agriculture and society.


a. Describes the role of plants in the food
chain.

b. Describes the role plants play in the
environment.

c. Explains how plants are
used in the
food and fiber system and ornamental
purposes.

d. Traces the origin of common crop and
ornamental plants.

f. Discusses the economic importance of
plant production.

g. Demonstrates the scientific method.

h. Explains why agriculture is an app
lied
science.

i. Describes at least three advances in
agriculture resulting from agricultural
research.

j. Describes the historical events related
to agricultural research and development.

k. Distinguishes between basic and
applied research.

l. Demonst
rates proper use of the
compound and dissecting microscopes.





Unit Complementary Standards



Unit Complementary Standards



SCSh2 Students will use standard
safety practices for all classroom
laboratory and field investigations.


a. Follow corre
ct procedures for use of
scientific apparatus.

b. Demonstrate appropriate techniques in
all laboratory situations.

c. Follow correct protocol for identifying
and reporting safety problems and
violations.





Unit Complementary Standards



SCSh6 Students

will communicate
scientific investigations and
information clearly.


a. Write clear, coherent laboratory
reports related to scientific investigations.

b. Write clear, coherent accounts of
current scientific issues, including
possible alternative interpre
tations of the
data.

c. Use data as evidence to support
scientific arguments and claims in written
or oral presentations.

d. Participate in group discussions of
scientific investigation and current
scientific issues.





Unit Complementary Standards



S
CSh9 Students will enhance reading
in all curriculum areas by:


a. Reading in All Curriculum Areas



Read a minimum of 25 grade
-
level appropriate books per year
from a variety of subject
disciplines and participate in
discussions related to curricular
learn
ing in all areas.



Read both informational and
fictional texts in a variety of
genres and modes of discourse.



Read technical texts related to
various subject areas.


b. Discussing books



Discuss messages and themes
from books in all subject areas.



Respond
to a variety of texts in
multiple modes of discourse.



Relate messages and themes
from one subject area to
messages and themes in another
area.



Evaluate the merit of texts in
every subject discipline.



Examine author’s purpose in
writing.



Recognize the featu
res of
disciplinary texts.


c. Building vocabulary knowledge



Demonstrate an understanding of
contextual vocabulary in various
subjects.



Use content vocabulary in writing
and speaking.



Explore understanding of new
words found in subject area texts.


d. Est
ablishing context



Explore life experiences related to
subject area content.



Discuss in both writing and
speaking how certain words are
subject area related.



Determine strategies for finding
content and contextual meaning
for unknown words.






Unit Co
mplementary Standards



SCSh3 Students will identify and
investigate problems scientifically.


a. Suggest reasonable hypotheses for
identified problems.

b. Develop procedures for solving
scientific problems.

c. Collect, organize and record
appropriate data
.

d. Graphically compare and analyze data
points and/or summary statistics.

e. Develop reasonable conclusions
based on data collected.

f. Evaluate whether conclusions are
reasonable by reviewing the process and
checking against other available
information.





Unit Complementary Standards



SSEF1 The student will explain why
limited productive resources and
unlimited wants result in scarcity,
opportunity costs and trade offs for
individuals, businesses and
governments.


b. Define and give examples of
pro
ductive resources as land (natural),
labor (human), capital (capital goods),
entrepreneurship.





Unit Complementary Standards



SSEF6 The student will explain how
productivity, economic growth and
future standards of living are
influenced by investmen
t in factories,
machinery, new technology and the
health, education and training of
people.


a. Define productivity as the relationship
of inputs to outputs.





Unit Complementary Standards



SSEMI2 The student will explain how
the Law of Demand, the L
aw of
Supply, prices and profits work to
determine production and distribution
in a market economy.


a. Define the Law of Supply and the Law
of Demand.





Unit Complementary Standards



SB4 Students will assess the
dependence of all organisms on one
an
other and the flow of energy and
matter within their ecosystems.


a. Investigate the relationships among
organisms, populations, communities,
ecosystems, and biomes.

b. Explain the flow of matter and energy
through ecosystems by



Arranging components of a f
ood
chain according to energy flow.



Comparing the quantity of energy
in the steps of an energy pyramid



Explaining the need for cycling of
major nutrients (C, O, H, N, P).


c. Relate environmental conditions to
successional changes in ecosystems.

d. Asses
s and explain human activities
that influence and modify the
environment such as global warming,
population growth, pesticide use, and
water and power consumption.

e. Relate plant adaptations, including
tropisms, to the ability to survive stressful
environ
mental conditions.

f. Relate animal adaptations, including
behaviors, to the ability to survive
stressful environmental conditions.





Unit Complementary Standards



SES6 Students will explain how life on
Earth responds to and shapes Earth
systems.


a.

Relate the nature and distribution of
life on Earth, including humans, to the
chemistry and availability of water.

b. Relate the distribution of biomes
(terrestrial, freshwater, and marine) to
climate regions through time.

c. Explain how geological and ec
ological
processes interact through time to cycle
matter and energy, and how human
activity alters the rates of these
processes (e.g., fossil fuel formation and
combustion).

d. Describe how fossils provide a record
of shared ancestry, evolution, and
extinc
tion that is best explained by the
mechanism of natural selection.

e. Identify the evolutionary innovations
that most profoundly shaped Earth
systems: photosynthetic prokaryotes and
the atmosphere; multicellular animals
and marine environments; land plants

and terrestrial environments.





Unit Complementary Standards



SB2 Students will analyze how
biological traits are passed on to
successive generations.


e. Compare the advantages of sexual
reproduction and asexual reproduction in
different situations
.






National / Local Standards / Industry / ISTE


(Recommended) National / Local
Standards / Industry / ISTE








Understanding and Goals


Unit Enduring Understandings



1.1

Students will understand the
connection
between Science and Agrisci
ence and how it
applies to modern agriculture.





1.2

1.3

Students will know the origins and uses of
plants, as well as understand the roles that
plants play in the environment and society.

1.4

Students will understand how to use
laboratory technology in

a safe manner.







Students will understand the importance and
types of agricultural research and their
significance in agriculture.





Unit Essential Questions



1.1

How do the different branches of science
relate to agriculture?

What is Agriscience
?

How is the Scientific method helpful in
understanding agriscience?

1.2

Why is it important to understand the history of
agricultural research?

How do the two divisions of scientific research
relate to agriculture?

Why is agricultural research important t
o the
public?

Why is agriculture an applied science?

1.3

How are plants the basis of all life?

What are the ways in which plants are
beneficial?



Why is it important to understand the roles
plants play in the environment and in the food
chain?

How are pla
nts used in research and non
-
food
products?

1.4

How do you prepare a lab to be a safe
environment?

What is the difference between computer
hardware and software?



Why is it important to understand the
hardware parts of a computer system and their
function
s?



How is software used?







(Recommended) Pre
-
Requisite
Knowledge & Skills / Current Unit
Knowledge & Skills








Assessment & Instruction


Formative Assessments for Learning





Objective assessment
-

Objective
assessments ⡵sually multiple
-
choice,
true
-

false, short answer) have correct
answers.



Self
-
assessment
-

May include practice
quizzes, games, simulations, checklists,
rubrics and other interactive exercises,
and practice written assignments



Individual project
-

An extended
inve
stigation carried out by an individual
student into a topic agreed on by student
and assessor using a rubric for
assessment.





Describe the Assessments


Describe the Assessment(s)





1.1

2. Self
-
assessment
-

Have t he st udent s design
t heir own experi
ment al st udy.


St udent s can
use t he examples list ed below or t he can
develop an experiment of t heir own.


EXPERIMENT 1: Some people say t hat
pennies put in a vase of wat er will help cut
flowers last longer.


Design an experiment t o
prove or disprove t his t
heory.

EXPERIMENT 2: A researcher want s t o
det ermine t he best dept h t o st ick cut t ings t o
get t he highest root ing percent age.


Design an
experiment t o find t he proper dept h.



EXPERIMENT 3: The researcher for Paulk’s
Plant food want s t o det ermine what level

of
nit rogen t o recommend t o Begonia growers.


It
is generally recommended t hat 100 ppm (part s
per million) is best, but t here is no research t o
prove t his.


Design an experiment t o see at
what level of nit rogen should be
recommended.





1.2


1.
Individual project
-

Have students think
about an area of agriculture in which they
believe more research is needed.


Students
should formulate a hypothesis and outline how
they would conduct a scientific research study
to gain more knowledge in the area.

2. Objective assessment
-

Give a test over the
material presented in the lesson.

1.3

1. Objective assessment
-

Give a test over the
material presented in the lesson.

2. Individual project: Research paper



1.4

1. Objective assessment
-

Give a test over lab

safety.

2. Objective assessment
-

Give a quiz over
microscope use.

3. Give a quiz over computer operation.







Assessment(s) Attachment




Instructional Planning


Instructional
Planning



1.1

Introduction and Mental Set

Apple demonstration (han
dout 1.1.1, Progressive Farmer Feb:March 1996)



Discussion



1. Define Science and Agriculture.



A. Science is the possession of knowledge through study or
experimentation.



B. Agriculture is the broad industry engaged in the produc
tion of
food and fiber, the division of


agriculture supplies and services, and
the processing, marketing, and distribution of


agriculture products.



2. What are the different branches of science?



A. Biology
-

the study of life (B
io
-
meaning life; ology
-
meaning the
study of)



B. Botany
-

the study of plants.



C. Zoology
-

the study of animals.



D. Chemistry
-

the study of the composition and chemical
properties of a substance.



E. Physics
-

the study of interactions between matter and energy in
the fields of mechanics,


sound, sight, magnetism, heat, and nuclear
properties.







3. How do the branches of science relate to agriculture?




A. Biology
-
genetic alterations in both plants and animals are used
to better them.



B. Botany
-

agriculture relies on the development of new and better
plants.



C. Zoology
-

livestock is a major industry in world agricultu
re.



D. Chemistry
-

fertilizers are made up of different elements.



E. Physics
-

concepts such as horsepower, torque, force, and
speed are used in agriculture


equipment.



4. What is the definition of Agriscience?




Agriscience is the study of all aspects of science related to
agriculture.





Agriscience also has many branches such as Plant Science,
Animal Science, Environmental


Science, Food Science, and Natural
Resources.



5. What is the Scie
ntific method?



A. Ask students what is their definition of the scientific method and
write the group answer on


the board.



The scientific method is a systematic approach to a problem in
which scientist use to solve



the unknown answers.



B. Explain to them that there are seven steps to the scientific
method.


Display and discuss


transparency 1.1.2.



Recognize the problem



Develop a Hypothesis




Design an experiment



Collect data



Analyze data



Draw conclusions



Make recommendations



6. Activity



In random order display seven flash card
s on the board that contains the
seven steps of the scientific method.


Then have all the students to rank
the cards in sequential order.


Ask for a volunteer to come to the board
and arrange the cards in order.


Keep asking for volunteers to come to the
b
oard until the Scientific method is in the correct order.



7. Discuss these terms:



A. Hypothesis
-

a theory by a scientist as to the cause or effect of a
phenomenon.



B. Variable
-

something that is likely to change.



C.
Independent Variable
-

a manipulated variable in an experiment
whose presence or


degree determines the change in the dependent
variable.





D. Dependent Variable
-

the observed variable in an experiment
whose changes are


dete
rmined by the presence or degree of one
or more independent variables.



Summary

Review important points of

The connection between Science and Agriscience.

The branches of science and how they pertain to Agriculture

The purpose of the scientific method.

Ho
w scientists and researchers apply the scientific method to their
research.

Vocabulary associated with the scientific method.

1.2

Introduction and Mental Set

Display a jar of peanut butter.


Using disposable plastic spoons, have the
students sample some.


Ask if anyone knows how long peanut butter has
been around.


Explain that peanut butter was unheard of until George
Washington Carver did research on peanuts around the turn of the century
(late 1800's
-
early 1900's).


Because of his research, peanuts repla
ced
cotton as Georgia’s number one crop. (Note: cotton became number one
again in 1995)



Additional Activity: Have the students read the information sheet 1.2.3 on
George Washington Carver’s research.



Additional activity: Ask students what special disti
nction Savannah Georgia
has as an experiment station and who Tomochci was.

Savannah was a well
-
planned city. General Oglethorpe had a plan for
success of the city long before the ship sailed in the early 1730's, including
establishment of an experiment sta
tion.


Tomochic was not the Braves
mascot
-

he was the Indian chief who held daily classes to teach the first
settlers of Georgia how to grow crops.


Oglethorpe experimented with silk
production (via Mulberry trees) and oranges among other crops. Georgia
h
ad the first experiment station in the US in the Founders Garden.



Discussion



1. When did scientific research begin in agriculture?



A. In the mid 1800's the curriculum at the Universities consisted of
Latin, Greek, history,


philosophy, a
nd mathematics.


People began to
see that there was a need for colleges to


teach material that was practical
and could be applied to real life.



B. In 1862 the Morrill Act was passed.


This provided public land
and funds for universities to



teach practical methods of agriculture.



C. Also in 1862, President Lincoln signed into law a bill that
established the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).



D. Hatch Act (1887).


This act established experiment sta
tions in all
states with land grant colleges.


These experiment stations used the
scientific method.



E. Smith
-
Lever Act (1914).


This act founded the Cooperative
Extension Service.


The


extension service is responsible for getting
the
information learned at the experiment stations


to the farmers and
agribusiness people.



F. Smith
-
Hughes Act (1917).


This act established Vocational
Agriculture in the public schools


to teach high school students about
the new methods
in agriculture.


This is known today as


Agricultural
Education.



2. What are the two divisions of scientific research?



A. Basic research: investigates why or how processes occur in
plants and animals.


Example:


basic research discov
ered the specific
hormones that control growth in animals.



B. Applied research: uses the discoveries made in basic research
to help in practical ways.




For example: applied research would use
the growth hormones discovered in basic re
search


to increase the
growth efficiency of livestock.



Note:


Agriculture is an applied science because almost all of the research
done on plants and animals is used in a practical way.



3. Who conducts agricultural research?



A. Experi
ment Stations/Universities



B. USDA



C. Large Corporations



4. What are some of the major milestones in agricultural research?


Display and discuss transparency 1.2.2.



A. Animal immunization: Resulting from Louis Pasteur=
s work,
many vaccines were


developed to control most of the diseases that
are contracted by livestock.



B. Canning and Refrigeration: Nicholas Appert invented the
canning method in the late


1700's.


This allowed people to store
food
for long periods of time.


In the 1880's, mechanical


refrigeration was
invented.


This allows fresh meat and produce to be shipped to everyone
in


the country.



C. Agricultural Mechanization: John Deere invented a plow that
could
turn heavy soils.


In


1831 Cyrus McCormick invented the reaper for
harvesting wheat.


Many other machines and


tools were invented to
make agriculture efficient and more productive.



D. Pesticides: Modern chemical pesticides have gre
atly increased
agricultural production.


They are used to control insect, weed, and fungal
pests.


Modern environmental laws help


keep damage to a minimum.



E. Genetics: The study of genetics started with Gregor Mendel.


Genetic research has



allowed us to develop crop hybrids that are
many times more productive.


It has also allowed the development of
superior strains of livestock.


For example, the weight of weaned calves


had more than doubled since 1925.



F. Embryo Tr
ansfer: With embryo transfer, livestock breeders can
use one superior dam to produce many offspring.



G. Computers: These instruments have greatly enhanced every
aspect of agriculture.


They


are used in areas such as record
keeping t
o precision farming.



H. bST Hormone in the dairy industry.



5.


Laboratory:

Have an agricultural researcher speak to the class or
have the local County Agent discuss the work of the Cooperative
Extension Service.



Summ
ary



Review the important points of:

Historical events

Basic and applied research

Who conducts agricultural research?

Major milestones in research

1.3





Introduction and Mental Set



Show the students a dried ear of corn.


Remove some of the grain from the
ear and ask the class how people benefit from the grain.


Have them
explore every benefit we derive from corn.


Examples include livestock
feed
--
which

in turn provides meat for humans, food for humans in various
forms (canned, raw, ground, popped, corn on the cob, etc.), stalks left in
the field to protect against erosion and return nutrients to the soil. Starch
from corn can be used to make biodegradab
le plastic products, and corn
can be made into ethanol for fuel.



Discussion



1. Why are plants important?



A. Green plants are the only link between the energy
-
giving sun
and the continuation of the life of man and other animals.






B. Green plants are able to absorb the energy from the sun and
store it in plant parts, such as


grains of wheat or corn, for later use.





C. Without this link to the sun, there would be no means for us to
gain its energy.



D. Demonstration: Put a peanut (or any other dry plant part) on the
end of a straightened


paper clip and burn it before the class.


Move your
hand over it to feel the heat.


Ask where


the heat came from.


Answer:
the sun





2. What are three

ways in which plants are beneficial?



Have students name examples for each.



A. Production of food crops (human and livestock)



people cannot survive without plants



B. Production of fiber crops



provides raw

materials to produce products such as clothing,
bedding, rope and cords, etc.



C. Beneficial to the environment



all forms of life need energy for growth and maintenance, take
energy from the sun and


convert into food



3. Wha
t role do plants play in the environment?

A common misconception is that plants provide only food and fiber.


Fortunately, plants do much more.


Display and discuss transparency
1.3.1.



Production of oxygen



Reservoir for carbon compo
unds



Prevention of soil erosion



Increase soil organic matter and soil quality



Beautification(trees and flowers)



Sound barriers



Recreational surfaces (turf)



Visual barriers



Lumber



Oils



Fuel



4. Plants also form the base of the food chain.



Have students name several kinds of animals.


Every animal imaginable
depends on plants either directly or indirectly.


For example: cattle depend
directly on plan
ts.


Bobcats, however, eat animals that eat plants.



5. Plants are also used in research and non
-
food products.



Research
--
crossbreeding, biotechnology, etc.



Non
-
food products
--
medicines, clothing, rubber, perfumes, and
spices.



6.

Where did common plant species originate?

Many crops are produced in the U.S.


and exported to many parts of the
world.


However, many plants originated from other countries.


Display a
world map and have students locate the countries to reinforce the
de
pendence of the world on each other not only in the past but today.



Corn
--
Mexico



Soybeans
--
China



Wheat
--
Southwestern Asia



Oats
--
Eastern Europe or Western Asia



Potatoes
--
South America



R
ice
--
Southeast Asia



Peanuts

Brazil



Cotton
--
India, Mexico



Sorghum
--
Africa and India



Flax
--
Mesopotamia, Assyria, Egypt



7. Activity

Have students choose one crop plant species from an instructor
-
generated
lis
t and prepare a written and/or oral report.


Include the following
information in the report.


If possible, have students research the topics on
the Internet.



A. History



B. Origin



C. Production areas in the world




D. Botanical characteristics (dicot or monocot, flower type, fruit
type, leaf arrangement, etc.)



E. Varieties



F. Products from species



G. Economical importance



H. Uses

(Optional): Bring in common crop sp
ecies grown locally to discuss.





8. Activity

Using a peace lily, a glass container or vase, and a fish, show that plants
need nutrients from water and light to live and that other organisms can
benefit from what the plant gives off.




A. Obtain a peace lily with a developed root system.



B. Wash all the soil off of the plant=s roots and place it in the glass
container or vase.



C. Place the fish (a Beta) in the glass container or vase.


The plant
will eventually
begin to


give off oxygen into the water which the fish
needs to survive.



D. Optional: put students into groups to make a few of these.



Summary



Review the important points of:

Uses of plants

Role plants play in the environment

Origins of c
ommon species


1.4

Introduction and Mental Set



Show video “Lab Safety: The Accident at Jefferson High.”


Take students
on a tour of the Agriscience facilities.


Show where various safety
apparatus is located.


If possible, demonstrate use of safety tools
.


Also,
posters should be placed in the lab to reinforce safety and guide students
to the various safety tools.


Important: Before students are allowed to work
in the lab a safety test should be administered.


Students should pass the
test with 100% accur
acy before being allowed to work in the lab.



Discussion



1. Distribute handout 1.4.1 and demonstrate the procedures when using a
microscope.



2. Laboratory:



Demonstrate how to prepare a wet and dry mount slide.



Have students examine a

small insect, such as an ant, and a small flower
under the dissecting scope.



3. What is the difference between computer hardware and software?





Hardware is the term used for the main equipment that makes up
the computer, such as


keyboar
d, monitor, and mouse.


Software is the
programs and instructions that make the hardware work.



4. What are the main hardware parts of a computer system?



Refer to computer and transparency 1.4.2.



System unit



Monitor



K
eyboard



Printer



Mouse



5. What are the functions of each of these parts?

System Unit
-

the main part of the computer.


(Four parts make up the
system)



-

Power Supply
-

main power



-

Motherboard
-

main chips




-

Disk Drives
-

floppies and hard disk



-

Ports
-

connects for printers, mouse, modem



-

Monitor
-

screen which shows the results.



-

Keyboard
-

Device used to put data into the computer.


Similar to
a typewriter

keypad.



-

Printer
-

Device used to receive a hard copy of the information.



-

Mouse
-

Small hand device that is used to move the pointer on
the screen.



6. What is a floppy disk?





A floppy disk is a place where data is

stored.


Data is written and
read on the disk by the disk


drive head.


If a CD
-
ROM is available,
provide a description also.



7. What are the two common sizes of diskettes?





There are two popular sizes, 5.25 inch and 3.5 inch disks.


They
can be purchased either as


double, high or super high
-
density.


The
5.25 inch disk can hold up to 360K (kilobytes) or


1.22 MB
(megabytes) of information.


The 3.5 inch disk has much more storage
capacity and


can store ei
ther 720K, 1.44 MB or 2.88 XB of
information, depending on the disk capabilities


and the disk drive
capabilities.



8. Are there any special precautions to take when handling a floppy disk?





Yes, special care must be taken not to d
amage the disk.


The
following rules should be


followed:

Keep disks away from magnets such as ringing telephones or magnetized
screwdrivers.

Never touch the disk surface.


Body oils can damage the surface. (plastic
cover is not the same)

Keep food and

drink away from the disks.


Food particles can damage the
read/write head.



Use a soft
-
pointed pen to label disks.

Protect disks from extreme hot or cold temperatures.



9. How do you insert a disk into a disk drive?

5.25 inch disk
-

Hold the floppy labe
l side up with your fingers located at
the end near the label.


Open the disk drive lever, insert disk all the way in
and then close the disk lever.


To remove, reverse steps.



3.5 inch disk
-

Slide disk, label side up, into correct drive until you hear a

click.


To remove, push button on front of drive and disk will pop out.


Provide and opportunity for students to practice this activity.



10. How is software used?





To operate the computer



To write letters, papers, reports, etc.



To keep records



To develop charts and graphs



To communicate with other people






Summary



Review the important points of:

Safety skills and importance

Microscope parts and functions

Computer skills and use







Stude
nts with disabilities:
For students with disabilities, each instructor
should refer to the student's IEP to be sure that the accommodations
specified in the IEP are being provided within the classroom setting.
Instructors should also familiarize themselves

with the provisions of
Behavior Intervention Plans that may be part of a student's IEP. Frequent
consultation with a student's special education instructor will be beneficial
in providing appropriate differentiation within any given instructional activity

or requirement.





Instructional Planning Attachment



(Optional) Instructional Planning
Attachment



Uploaded file:
1.1 Transparencies.doc







(Optional)
Instructional
Planning
Attachment



Uploaded file:
Agriscience_Applied_Science_&_Technology_Course_02471
-
2.ppt







(Op
tional) Instructional Planning


Uploaded file:
1.2 Transparencies and
Attachment

Handout.doc







(Optional) Instructional Planning
Attachment



Uploaded file:
History_of_Biotechnology.ppt







(Optional) Instructional Planning
Attachment



Uploaded file:
1.3 Transparency.doc







(Optional) Instructional Planning
Attachment



U
ploaded file:
Asexual_Plant_Pro
pagation.ppt







(Optional) Instructional Planning
Attachment



Uploaded file:
Sexual_Plant_Prop.ppt







(Optional) Instructional Planning
Attachment



Uploaded file:
1.4 Transparency and
Handout.doc








Materials and Equipment / Homework Extensions


Materials and Equipment





1.1

Transparenci
es 1.1.1
-

1.1.2





1.2

One jar of peanut butter, spoons, and a soft
drink

Transparencies 1.2.1
-
1.2.2

Handout 1.2.3



1.3

The teacher will need a dried ear of corn and
various other plants that are used in the area
--
ex. Soybean, peanut, pine, cotton

Worl
d Map

Transparency 1.3.1







(Optional) Homework Extensions







Attachment


Homework Extensions



Culminating Unit Performance Task




Student Work Sample Title / Description


(Optional) Student Work Sample Title /
Description







Attachment
-

Student Work Sample




Teacher Commentary Title / Description


(Optional) Teacher Commentary Title /
Description







Attachment
-

Teacher Commentary




Language of the Standards


(Optional) Language of the Standards








U
nit Resources


(Optional) Web Resources







(Optional) Ancillary Materials







(Optional) What 21st Century
Technology was used in this Unit
Development Template?







(Optional) Notes and Reflections