A taste of India: KWL chart - foodtech1

harpyshelfBiotechnology

Dec 12, 2012 (4 years and 10 months ago)

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Worksheet 3.5: Researching the technology of genetic
engineering



Genetic engineering is a recent technology that has brought
about much ethical and moral debate. Use a variety of
resources such as books, journals and the internet to
research the
following areas. Make brief notes of your
findings.

1

Define ‘genetic engineering’.

Genetic engineering is a scientific alteration of the structure
of genetic material in a living organism. It involves, the
production and use of recombinant DNA and
has been
employed to create bacteria.



2

Identify foods that are currently genetically
modified.

Maize (corn)

Wheat

Rice

Oilseed rape (canola)

Chicory

Squash

Potato

Soybean

Alfalfa

Cotton.



3

List the countries that accept the tec
hnology of genetic
engineering.

United states, japan, south Korea, united kingdom, France,
and Germany.



4

List the countries that reject the technology of genetic
engineering.







5

Explain how a technology such as genetic
engineering has

influenced our food availability and
selection.











The Australian cuisine was traditionally based on what
would grow in Australia and what was available. The
migration of many cultures to Australia over the past sixty
years has resulted in a
diverse mix of food. The size of
Australia means that when the season for a particular
fruit finishes in one state the same fruit is starting to
ripen in another part of the country. With quick and
efficient transportation methods food is easily delivered
to other parts of the country.









Plentiful

Innovative

Colourful

Relaxed

Flavour filled



Australian food is able to continually evolve is because of
resources and consumer needs













Worksheet 3.1: Australian bush tucker

1

Complete the brainstorm with as many different Australian bush foods
as you can think of.








2

Name a recipe or dish in which you could use each of the foods you
brainstormed. One example has been completed for you.





Tucker



Recipe or dish



Wattle seed



Wattle seed damper




macadamia nut




macadamia and wattle seed muffins


bush tomato


bush tomato soup with bush spices














Worksheet 3.3: Early European influences

Complete the following passage with the words listed in the word

bank.

Early inhabitants of Australia

The First Fleet landed at Sydney Cove on 26 January, 1788. On
arrival, the first settlers’ immediate needs were
food

and
shelter
, but
they were uncertain of how to obtain these.

Aboriginal peoples had survived on the land with their unique
lifestyle, habits, and hunting and
gathering
techniques, but these
seemed
alien

to the settlers.

The Australian
land

and climate were very different from what they
were used to, thus many
crops

failed. The free settlers and convicts
were not farmers or fishermen, and had very little previous
knowledge about
agriculture
. The food supply was
rationed

with
carefully measured quantities of flour, salted __________, sugar and
__________ until there could be enough food produced to sustain
everyone. Seeds and __________ withered quickly because of the
different climate.

After years of hard work on the lan
d, the first crops eventually
succeeded. Corn, __________ and __________ were grown because
they suited the dry, harsh climate better than the British staples such
as __________ and __________.

Word bank



rice

barley


meat

po
tatoes

rationed

rye


vines

wheat

A pound is approximately equal to 450 grams (the size of a
packet of pasta); an ounce is about 30 grams (the size of a
small bag of chips); and a pint is about 600 millilitres (the size
of a bott
le of coke).

Today, 23 per cent of Australians were born in another country and
just over 25 per cent of the population have at least one parent who
was born overseas. Over 20 per cent of the current Australian
population now come from a non
-
English
-
speaki
ng background. All
these people have brought their food habits to Australia, which has
resulted in the expansion of the diet of all Australians.







1 List the different ways that European settlement
influenced the food habits of many Aborigines. European
settlement influenced Australian aborigines a lot, they
started eating imported animals, fruits, vegetables and
other food products and equipment th
at the settlers
brought to Australia with them.

2 Outline how the early settlers' diet compared with that
of the Aborigines. The early settlers diet is quite different
to the aborigines because there way of life was much
different, the settlers had differ
ent meat and vegetables
and the way they prepared it was much different

3 Explain why the early settlers didn't include more bush
tucker in their diets. The early settlers didn’t include
more bush tucker in the diets because they didn’t agree
with the way

the aborigines lived or they way they
collected and prepared food.


4 Why was rationing of foods necessary during
Australia's early settlement? Because food was limited,
and we needed to save it.

5 Why do you think the meat was salted, instead of left
fre
sh? Because it lasted longer.





A taste of India: KWL chart

Australia is a multicultural country with a range of influences on the
cuisine that is cooked in homes and eaten in restaurants and caf
é
s.
Before, during and after watching the video
A

taste of India
, complete
the KWL chart below.



Extension: Research the history, recipe and method for one of the
foods mentioned in the video.



Curry:

'Curry' is technically a Western term that refers to a spice or type
of dish served in a variety of
cultures, but it is closely
-
related to
the culture of India. Indian cuisine dates back thousands of years
and is rich in history and spice! Keeping reading to learn how to
make your own Indian powders and cook with them on a regular
basis!



Curry Lobster
Method

Heat ghee and fry garlic until lightly browned. Add lobster and
fry for 5 minutes. Add lemon juice, chilli powder, turmeric, sugar
and salt. Cover and simmer gently until tender, adding a little
water if necessary an stirring occasionally. Garnish w
ith coriander
and serve hot with rice and vegetables.







Topic





What I know

What I would
like to know

What I learnt


India has a lot of spicy
foods



They have coconuts in
south India



South India is tropical
and they have lots of
tropical foods
and fruits



A lot of Indians are
vegetarians because
they have a lot of fresh
ingredients










Where they
get there food



How they
prepare food



Ingredients
they use for
food



Desserts in
India


They sell fresh meat



India has different
climates
so different
food is made all over
India





They have a lot of food
in meals at home



They have food stalls



They have food markets
all the time







1 List the foods or dishes that you would regard as
traditional Australian foods. Explain why.

Lamingtons, meat pies and vegemite, I classify
these as traditional Australia foods because they
were invented here and are eaten all over Australia.



2 Identify the popular foods that are available today
because of migration. Where have these foods
come
from?

Pizza, pasta, olives and gelato are very popular in
Australia we have these foods because of Italian
migration.



7 Using the website link,

visit Coles Online and
undertake a virtual shop of the shelves. Look at the
range of fresh meats, dairy products, fruits,
vegetables, frozen products and convenience meals
available. Select five products and explain how
immigration has influenced each.





Satiety
-
feelings of satisfaction

Hunger is the unpleasant feeling created wen the body
says that is t needs food straight away

Apatite is the desire for certain foods even when your not
hungry it is often created by your own personal
experiences, and you
r desire for food.














PHYSIOLOGICAL INFLUENCES




satiety: state of being fed or satisfied






Hunger is the unpleasant feeling created when the
body says that it needs food straight away.


Appetite is the desire for certain foods even when
you
are not hungry. It is generally the result of personal
experiences as well as your senses of sight, taste and
smell.





Molecular gastronomy is the investigation of the
physical and biological processes of cooking. Its goals
are social, technical and arti
stic.