IGA-410 OVERVIEW Energy Policy: Technologies, Systems, and Markets

hamburgerfensuckedSecurity

Nov 20, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

94 views


1

IGA
-
410 OVERVIEW


Energy Policy: Technologies, Systems, and Markets


Henry Lee


Fall 2013


T/TH

2:40



4:00,
L230



IGA
-
410 introduces students to the design, implementation and assessment of energy policy from the United States and
global perspective.
Energy influences every facet of our economic and social fabric, affecting international security,
economic development, and human health. This course covers a wide range of topics, including oil and natural gas, coal,
electricity policy, renewable energy,

nuclear power, energy efficiency, and climate change. It also introduces students to
the basic tools used to analyze and assess energy options. The course’s purpose is to expose students to the
fundamental factors that drive energy markets, the causes of
market failures, and how government interaction can
mitigate those failures. It also addresses the political context, both domestic and international, where government
energy policies are designed and implemented.


The syllabus briefly describes each class
, assigns the required readings, and lists additional readings that are optional.
While most of the early classes will be lectures, to ensure that students understand the fundamentals of energy
markets, many of the classes during the second half of the cou
rse will be case or issue discussions. Students will be
expected to participate in these discussions.
There will be
three

short take home assignments that will provide
students
an opportunity

to 1) use the analytical skills covered in class, and 2) assess
specific

energy
policy
issues
.

Students will
also be required to write two short memos on topics related to class discussions.


Requirements are: 1)
Three

short

take home assignments (
30

points
)
,

2) Two policy memos (30 points),

3
)

Class
participation (10
points),

and
4
) Final exam (
3
0 points).

The class will

be divided into
three

sections and each section will
be assigned

two

policy memos
-

assignment details will be handed out in class.

A
ll a
ssignments will be submitted

as
hardcopies

in the drop box outsi
de Pro
fessor Lee’s office, Belfer 302
.
All course readings are available on the course
website.


This course will require students to apply basic microeconomic concepts and will cover methodologies that will allow
students to quantitatively assess and compose energy options. While no prerequisites are required, familiarity with
microeconomic concepts
will be helpful.


The class size is limited by the number of seats in the classroom.


Henry Lee will hold office hours on Wednesdays
, 1:00pm


2:00pm

and Thursdays, 10:30am


11:50am
. C
ourse
assistants’ office hours will be posted in early September.


Rev
iew room:
Friday at 11:40am in L130







2

IGA
-
410 OVERVIEW


Energy Policy: Technologies, Systems, and Markets


Henry Lee


Fall 2013


T/TH 2:40


4:00, L280



Henry Lee
, Belfer
302
, 617
-
495
-
1350,
henry_lee@harvard.edu

Faculty Assistant,
Natalie Rios
, Belfer 302
, 617
-
495
-
8850,
natalie_rios@hks.harvard.edu


Teaching Fellow,

Rohit Chandra,

rchandra@fas.harvard.edu

Course Assistant,
Selahattin
Sirin
,
Selahattin_Sirin@hks14.harvard.edu



Class #

Date

Day


Topic



1

9/5

THU

Motivation, Organization, Introduction to the Issues


A
ims and structure of the course; l
inks between energy and important dimensions of human well
-
being: energy &
economy (development, growth, jobs, trade); energy & environment;
energy & international security; s
urvey of tools
and approaches for the study of energy issues.


Reading:


(
R

= REQUIRED,
O

= OPTIONAL; assignments to be read
before

the indicated class):




R: GEA, 2012: Global Energy Assessment


Toward a Sustainable Future, Cambridge University Press, 2012,
Chapter 1, p. 103
-
140
http://www.iiasa.ac.at/web/home/research/Flagship
-
Projects/Global
-
Energy
-
Assessment/Chapters_Home.en.html




2

9/10

TUES

The

Economics of Energy Supply and Demand

Will review d
emands on capital and labor, patterns of energy use, elasticity, tariff setting
, and trade impacts;
i
ntroduction to market failures (excessive concentration of market power, lack of information, externali
ties, public
goods,

and

inequality).

This class aims to familiarize students with the basic economic concepts that we will use to assess
the effectiveness of energy policies in subsequent classes.


Reading:




R: Tom Tietenberg, Environment and Natural Reso
urce Economics, Addison Wesley, sixth edition, 2003, pp. 151
-
165
.




R:
Global Energy Assessment


Towards a Sustainable Future


Cambridge University Press, 2012,
ch. 6.1
-
6.5, p.
389
-
407,
http://www.iiasa.ac.at/web/home/research/Flagship
-
Projects/Global
-
Energy
-
Assessment/GEA_Chapter6_economy_lowres.pdf






3

3

9/12

THU

World Oil & Gas Markets I

Where oil and gas resources and reserves are found, the economics of oil exploration, production and refining, how oil
and gas markets work, and the politics of oil and gas, both domestic and international. Political and secu
rity implications
of world patterns of oil and gas supply and demand.


Reading:




R:
Leonardo Maugeri,
Beyond the Age of Oil: The Myths, Realities, and Future of Fossil Fuels and Their
Alternatives
,
(2012)
pp.
3
-
36.




R
: Ian W.H. Parry and Joel Darmstadler,
“The Cost of U.S. Oil Dependency”,

Resources for the Future, Nov. 2004,
prepared for the National Commission on Energy Policy
,

http://www.b
ipartisanpolicy.org/sites/default/files/I.1.a_
-
_Cost_of_Oil_Dependency_44ce6838a8cd5.pdf





R: William Leffler,
Petroleum Refining for the Non
-
Technical Person

(PennWell, 1979) Chapters 2 & 3 pp. 3
-
25.




O: Suzanne Maloney “Energy Security in the Persian Gulf: Opportunities and Challenges” in Carlos Pascual and
Jonathan Elkind, ed. Energy Security (Brookings
Press,

2010) p.37
-
58
.



4

9/17

TUES

Natural Gas Markets

This class will
introduce students to how
natural gas markets work. Students will be introduced to both domestic and
international markets including pipeline gas, LNG, as well as shale gas.


Reading:




R: National Petroleum Council,
Hard Truths: Facing the Hard Truths about Energy
,
July 2007,
Chapter 2: Energy
Supply, pp. 131
-
170,
http://www.npchardtruthsreport.org/download.php





R:
David Rotman, “Natural Gas Changes the Energy Map” MIT Tech
nology Review, November 1, 2009,

http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/415725/natural
-
gas
-
changes
-
the
-
energy
-
map/





R: Pietro Nivola, “Maki
ng Sense of Energy Independence”

in
Carlos
Pascual

and Jonathan Elkind, ed. E
nergy
Security (Brookings Press
, 2010)

p
p
. 105
-
118.




Take Home Assignment

1

due

9
/24

by 2

PM



5

9/19

THU

The
Shale Revolution


W
ill it
C
hange the
E
nergy
S
ecurity paradigm?

This class will

discuss the implications of shale oil and gas resources in the U.S. Will the U.S. become a net exporter of
both oil and gas? Is this revolution exportable to other parts of the world?



Reading:




R: Leonardo Maugeri
, “The Shale Oil Boom: A U.S.
Phenomenon” (Belfer Center for Science and International
Affairs, June 2013)
,
http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/files/The%20US%20Shale%20Oil%20Boom%20Web.pd
f




R
: Bailey, Jonathan and Lee, Henry. “North American Oil and Gas Reserves: Prospects and Policy”
(
Belfer Center
for Sci
ence and International Affairs,
July 2012
),
http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/files/Shale%20Workshop%20Rapporteur%20Report%20May%202012.pdf





4

6

9/24

TUES

Oil and Gas in the Developing World

(Guest Speaker
:

Francisco Monaldi)


Reading:




R: Naazneen Barma et al,
Rents to
riches? : the political economy of natural resource led development

(World
Bank, 2012) pp. 1
-
30,
http://www
-
wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2011/12/08/000333037_20111208233949/R
endered/PDF/659570PUB0EPI10737B0Rents0to0Riches.pdf





R: Noel Maurer and Aldo Musacchio, “Pemex (A): In a Free Fall?” and “Pemex (B
): The Re
bound”, December
2012. HBS Case 9
-
713
-
051.



7

9/26

THU


Coal: Supply, Demand, and Pollution Abatement Options

Coal is the most plentiful energy resource in the US, China and India, but it is also among the most carbon
-
intensive.
Class will cover
supply and consumption patterns, environmental effects, liquefaction, and carbon capture sequestration
technologies.


Reading:




R: MIT Interdisciplinary Study, “Future of Coal”, MIT, 2007, Executive Summary, Chapter 2 and 3,
http://web.mit.edu/coal/The_Future_of_Coal.pdf





R: J. Fellows, “Dirty Coal, Clean Future,” (Atlantic, Dec. 2010),
http://www.
theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2010/12/dirty
-
coal
-
clean
-
future/8307/





R: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, "Air Pollution and Health Risk." June 6, 2007 Web.
http://www.epa.gov/ttn/atw/3_90_022.html





R: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, "Pollutants in the Ambient Air." January 29, 2010Web.
http://www.epa.gov/apti/course422/ap2.html




8

10/1

TUES


Climate Change: Science and Impacts

(Guest Speaker: Daniel Schrag)

The science of energy
-
related global climate
-
change and climate
-
change impacts; strategies for reducing the risks of
energy
-
related climate change; the IPCC Report and the implications of

recent scientific studies.


Reading:




R: Daniel P. Schrag, “Confronting the Climate
-
Energy Challenge,”
Elements
, June 2007, pp 171
-
178,
http://elements.geoscienceworld.org/content/3/3/171.full.pdf+html





R:
Noah S. Diffenbaugh

and
Christopher B. Field
,

Changes in Ecologically Critical Terrestrial Climate Conditions,

Science

2 August 2013:
Vol. 341
no. 6145
pp. 486
-
492
DOI:
10.1126/science
.1237123,
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/341/6145/486.full.pdf






5

9

10/3

THU

Policies to Address Climate Change

This class will discuss domestic policy options to address climate
change including carbon tax, cap and trade and
compulsory regulation of power plants.


Reading:




R: Ian Parry, Fiscal instruments for Climate Finance (in Handbook on Energy and Climate Change) Roger Fouquet
(2013), p. 377
-
402.




R: Ted Nordhaus & Michael Sh
ellenberg, “Apocalypse Fatigue: Losing the Public Climate on Climate Change”
Environment 360, Nov. 16, 2009,
http://e360.yale.edu/feature/apocalypse_f
atigue_losing_the_public_on_climate_change/2210/




10

10/8

TUES


China I

China is the fastest growing economy in the world. This class will focus on China’s energy use and the driving force that
shapes its energy policies.


Reading:




R:
Fredrich Kahrl
, et al., Challenges to China's transition to a low carbon electricity system,
Energy Policy
,
Volume
39, Issue 7
, July 2011, Pages 4032

4041,
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421511000413





R: Damien Ma, China Answers the Call for Rebalancing in the Next Decade, The Atlantic, March 17, 2011,
http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2011/03/how
-
should
-
china
-
solve
-
its
-
energy
-
problems/72716/





R: Scott Moore, The politics of Trust: managing water
resources under scarcity in the Yellow River Basin in the
People’s Republic of China (SSP discussion paper, 2013).




O: Yuyu Chen, et al., Evidence on the impact of sustained exposure to air pollution on life expectancy from China’s Huai
River policy, doi:
10.1073/pnas.1300018110
,
PNAS

July 8, 2013
,
http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/07/03/1300018110.full.pdf+html



11

10/10

THU

CHINA II

This class will continue the dis
cussion on China’s energy policy


focusing on options for reducing the growth in coal
consumption, mitigating urban air pollution, and improving long term energy security.


Reading:




R: China Energy Research Institute, China Energy Outlook 2013,
Executive Summary,

p. 19
-
46,
http://www.eri.org.cn/uploadfile/Executive_Summary.pdf





R: Richard Lester and Edward Steinfeld, China’s Real Energy Crisis, Harvard Asia Pacific Review, Vo
l. 9, November
2007,
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~hapr/winter07_gov/lester.pdf







6

12

10/15

TUES

Policy Discussion



Climate Change

This class
will address two issues: Should Harvard divest its shares
in energy companies producing fossil fuels? Should

President Obama approve
the Keystone

XL Pipeline? The class will be a discussion of the two issues that have become
policy battlegrounds in the cli
mate debate.


Reading
:




R: Bill McKibben,
Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math
, Rolling Stone, July 19, 2012,
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/global
-
warmings
-
terrifying
-
new
-
math
-
20120719?print=true





R:
Congressional Research Service: Keystone XL Pipeline Project: Key Issues, p. 5
-
34, May 7 2013,
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R41668.pdf





R: Michael Shear and
Jackie

Calmes, Obama Says He’ll Evaluate Pipeline P
roject Depending on Pollution, NY
Times, July 27, 2013,
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/28/us/politics/obama
-
says
-
hell
-
e
valuate
-
pipeline
-
project
-
depending
-
on
-
pollution.html?_r=0





R:
Elana Schor,
Are Environm
entalists Getting It Wrong on the Keystone XL Pipeline?
, Atlantic, Feb.

15, 2013,
http://www.nationaljournal.com/energy/are
-
en
vironmentalists
-
getting
-
it
-
wrong
-
on
-
the
-
keystone
-
xl
-
pipeline
-
20130215





O: William Nordhaus, “A question of Balance: Weighing the Options of Global Warming Policy” (Yale University
Press 2008) pp. 1
-
29
.



13

10/
17

THU

Energy Subsidies

(Guest Speaker: Joe
Aldy
)


Reading:




R:
"Joint Report by IEA, OPEC, OECD, and World Bank on Fossil
-
Fuel and Other Energy Subsidies: An Update of
the G20 Pittsburgh and Toronto Commitments," 2011,
http:/
/www.oecd.org/site/tadffss/49006998.pdf






R:
International Monetary Fund. 2013. "Energy Subsidy Reform: Lessons and Implications."
http://www.imf.org/external/np/pp/eng/2013/012813.pdf





14

10/22

TUES

Cost Comparison Methodologies & Energy Finance

Methodologies for evaluating and comparing the costs of energy projects.

This class will provide the analytical methods
for comparing different electricity generation options and sets the stage for the classes on electricity options that follow.

If time permits, students will be introduced to some of the fundamentals of energy

finance.


Reading:




R: Robert S. Pindyck,
Microeconomics [7th edition]
, Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2009. "Investment, Time,
and
Capital Markets," pp. 573
-
577.





R: Congressional Budget Office, “The Economics of Climate Change: A Primer,” US Congress, Washington, DC.
April 2003, pp. 23
-
34.




R: Edith Stokey and Richard Zeckhauser,
A Primer for Policy Analysis
, Norton, Chapter 10,
pp. 159
-
176.



7


Take Home Assignmen
t 2 due

10/29 by 2

PM


15

10/24

THU

Electricity Policy I

The economics of electricity markets and their component parts, models for competitive pricing at the wholesale and
retail level, transmission pricing and sitting, and the new role for regulation.


Reading:




R: Timothy Brennan, et. al.
Alternating Currents: Electricity Markets and Public Policy
, Washington DC: Resources
for the Future,

2002, pp. 1
-
12, 33
-
45, 81
-
91.




R: Paul Joskow, “Markets for Power in the United States”,
The Energy Journal,

2006, vol. 27, no 1, pp. 1
-
36,
http://econ
-
www.mit.edu/files/1184





R: United States Department of Energy, “Electricity 101”,
http://energy.gov/oe/information
-
center/educational
-
resources/electricity
-
101



Videos:




How Electricity Works (20 minutes)





Working of a Coal Fuel Power Plant (4 minutes)



16

10/29

TUES

Electricity Policy II

This class will introduce students to electricity market reforms, including transmission and generatio
n.




R: Case on NY Transmission


The New York Independent System Operation (A): Wholesale Energy and Capacity
Markets
.




R: William Hogan, A Competitive Electricity Market Model, Harvard Electricity Policy Group, October 9, 1993,

http://www.hks.harvard.edu/fs/whogan/transvis.pdf




17

10/31

THU

Electricity Policy II
I

This class will focus on the California electricity crisis. What went wrong and what could California officials have done
differently? What lessons can one take away from the restructuring reforms that swept the globe in the late 90s and
early part of the last decade?


Reading:




R: “Disaster by Design: California’s Experience with Electricity Restructuring“, HKS Case Study
A & B, CR 14
-
01
1632, CR 14
-
01 1633.




O: Paul Joskow, “Lessons Learned from Electricity Market Liberalization,”
Energy Journal: Special Issue on the
Future of Electricity 2008
, pp. 9
-
42,
http://ezp
-
prod1.hul.harvard.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=45388868&
site=ehost
-
live&scope=site






8

18

11/5

TUES

Renewable E
nergy


An Overview

This class starts a three class segment on renewable energy with an overview of key renewable technologies, including
wind, solar, biomass and geothermal energy. The subsequent two classes will explore the policy challenges confronting
wind and solar energy options.


Reading:




R: Judith Lipp, “Lessons for Effective Renewable Electricity Policy from Denmark, Germany and the United
Kingdom” Energy Policy, Vol. 35, No. 11, pp. 5481
-
5495, 2007,
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421507002091





R: David J.C. Mackey,
Sustainable Energy


Without the Hot Air
, UIT Cambridge, 2009:

pp. 22
-
28:
http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/withouthotair/c2/page_22.shtml





pp. 38
-
49:
http://www.inferenc
e.phy.cam.ac.uk/withouthotair/c6/page_38.shtml



pp. 50:
http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/withouthotair/c7/page_50.shtml


pp. 81
-
87:
http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/withouthotair/c14/page_81.shtm l

pp. 88:
http://www.in
ference.phy.cam.ac.uk/withouthotair/c15/page_88.shtml


pp. 186
-
201:
http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/withouthotair/c26/page_186.shtml





R: John Decicco,
Why Pushing Alter
nate Fu
els
Makes for Bad Public Policy
, Environment 360, 22 Aug 2013,
http://e360.yale.edu/feature/why_pushing_alternate_fuels__makes_for_bad_public
_policy/2682/




19

11/7

THU

Renewable Energy


Policy Options

This class will look at the strengths and weaknesses of various policies to promote solar energy options

including feed
-
in tariffs and renewable portfolio standards.


Reading:




R: Leah Stokes

and Henry Lee
,

Feed
-
In Tariffs: The Experience of the Gainesville Regional Utility.




R: National Journal, April 25, 2009 “What Exactly is a Feed
-

In Tariff?” pp. 36
-
37,
http:/
/www.nationaljournal.com/njmagazine/nj_20090425_3763.php





O: Summary of Bingaman Discussion Draft


Renewable Portfolio Standard, January 2009,
http://www.eei.org/whatwedo/PublicPolicyAdvocacy/washreps/Documents/Bingaman%201
-
09%20amendment%20summary%20final.pdf







9

20

11/12

TUES

Renewable Energy


Wind

Class will discuss the economic and institutional factors affecting
greater penetration of wind power in the US.
Specifically it will focus on the nine year debate over the development of a wind farm off the coast of Cape Cod.


Reading
:




R: Richard Vietor: Cape Wind: Offshore Wind Energy in the USA: HBS case 9
-
708
-
022.




R: How a Wind Turbine Works
-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LNXTm7aHvWc





R: David J.C. Mackey,
Sustainable Energy


Without the Hot Air
, UIT Cambridge, 2009:

http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/withouthotair/c4/page_32.shtml

pp. 32
-
34
http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/withouthotair/c10/page_60.shtml
, pp. 60
-
67
http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/withouthotair/cB/page_263.shtml
, pp. 263
-
268

http://www.inference.phy.cam.ac.uk/withouthotair/cC/page_269.shtml
, pp. 269




R:
Leonardo Maugeri
,
Beyond the age of oil
: the myths, realities, and future of fossil fuels and their alternatives

(Prae
ger, 2010) Ch. 8, pp. 141
-
154.




R. Boaz Moselle, “Renewable Generation and Security of Supply”,
Harnessing Renewable Ener
gy in Electric
Power Systems
, pp. 51
-
68.



Take Home Assignment 3 due 11/19 by
2

PM



21

11/14

THURS

Nuclear Technologies

(Guest Speaker: Matthew Bunn)

This class will focus on nuclear power
-

its potential and the risks inherent in expanding its
development.


Reading:




R: How a Nuclear Power Plant Works
-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJfIbBDR3e8





R: WEA, 2000, Chapter 8, section on “Advanced nuclear energy technologies,” pp. 306
-
318
http://www.ss.undp.org/content/dam/undp/library/Environment%20and%20Energy/Sustainable%20Energy/we
a%202000/chapter8.pdf





R: Keystone Center,
Nuclear Power Joint Fact
-
Finding,
2007, Executive Summary, pp. 9
-
18,
http://www.nuclear.gov/pdfFiles/rpt_KeystoneReportNuclearPowerJ
ointFactFinding_2007.pdf





R: Matthew Bunn, “Managing Risks From a Nuclear Energy Revival,” presentation, January 2009,
http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/files/bunn
-
goresum
mit
-
08.pdf





O: President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology, “Nuclear Energy: Fission and Fusion,” chapter
5 in
Federal Energy Research and Development for the Challenges of the 21st Century
, Executive Office of the
President of the United
States, November 1997, pp. 5
-
1 to 5
-
24,
http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/files/pcast97_ch5.pdf






10

22

11/19

TUES

Energy Technology and Innovation

(Guest Speaker: Laura Diaz
Anadon)

This class will examine the innovation process that takes energy technologies from invention to commercialization. It will
focus specifically on the institutions and policies that are critical to the development of a new menu of energy
technologies
.


Reading:




R: Venkatesh Narayanamurti, Laura Anadon and Ambuj Sagar, “Institutions for Energy Innovation: A
transformational Challenge” (Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University 2009),

http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/files/Institutions
-
for
-
Energy
-
Innovation
-
A
-
Transformational
-
Challenge.pdf





R: K.S. Gallagher, J
.P. Holdren and Ambuj Sagar

“Energy
-
Technology Innovation“ in the Annual Review of
Environmental Resources, 31 (2006) pp. 193
-
237,

http://www.annualreviews.org/do
i/pdf/10.1146/annurev.energy.30.050504.144321




23

11/21

THU

Energy Technology Innovation II

This class will look at the factors contributing to technological innovation in context of the problems facing 1366
Technologies, a local solar startup company.


Reading:




R: Joseph Lassiter, et.al “1366 Technologies” Harvard Business School 9
-
810
-
005 (Cambridge, Mass, 2010).





R: Venkatesh Narayanamurti, et al.
Transforming the Energy Economy: Options for Accelerating the
Commercialization of Advanced Energy Techn
ologies.

Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group,
Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School, February 2011,
http://be
lfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/files/ETIP_Workshop_Report_Feb_2011_2.pdf




24

11/26

TUES

Increased Energy Efficiency


This class will look at increasing energy efficiency


both in buildings and
m
otor

v
ehicles
.


Reading:




R
: Global Energy Assessment
, 2013,
IIASA,

p. 657
-
670 and p 722
-
744 (chapter 10.1 and 10.8)
,
http://www.iiasa.ac.at/web/home/research/Flagship
-
Projects/Globa
l
-
Energy
-
Assessment/GEA_CHapter10_buildings_lowres.pdf





R:
Transportation Research
,

Policy Options for Reducing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S.
Transportation (Washington, DC, 2011) chapter 5 p.
149
-
194
,
http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=13194&page=149




Thursday,

November 28 is Thanksgiving, no class.






11

25

12/3

TUES

Country Study 1
:
Japan
: Post Fukushima

In 2010, Japan experienced a meltdown at 4 nuclear power plants at Fukushima. The disaster and the subsequent public
outcry resulted in the shutdown of all 52 of Japan’s nuclear reactors, forcing the country to diametrically increase its
imports of coal an
d oil. Both energy prices and carbon emissions have risen significantly.


Reading:




R: Nagatomi, Yu et al, “Short
-
term Energy Supply and Demand Outlook,” Institute for Energy Economics, Ja
pan,
July 3, 2012,

http://eneken.ieej.or.jp/data/4584.pdf






R: “Innovative Strategy for Energy and the Environment,” the Energy and Environment Council, Government of
Japan, September 14, 2012,
http://www.npu.go.jp/en/policy/policy06/pdf/20121004/121004_en2.pdf




26

12/5

THU Country Study 2:

Energy in Developing Countries

This class will focus on the energy problems confronting poor developing countries. It will use the case of Liberia to
discuss the challenges of attracting investments in an electricity system.


Reading:




R: Akash Deep and Henry Lee: Buchanan Renewables:

Bringing Power to Liberia, Case

171813.




R: John E. Besant
-
Jones, “Reforming Power Markets in Developing Countries: What Have We Learned?” Energy
and Mining Sector Board Discussion Paper, no. 19, The World Bank, September 2006, pp.1
-
8, 21
-
36,
http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTENERGY/Resources/Energy19.pdf





Final Exam Due 5pm on December
12