Gi h Gi h GreeningtheEconomy GreeningtheEconomy with Agriculture (GEA) Initiative with Agriculture (GEA) Initiative withAgriculture(GEA)Initiative withAgriculture(GEA)Initiative

halffacedacidicManagement

Nov 6, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

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FAOtowardsRio+20FAOtowardsRio+20
FAO
 
towards
?
Rio+20FAO
?
towards
?
Rio+20
GihGih
G
reen
i
ng t
h
e Economy
G
reen
i
ng t
h
e Economy
withAgriculture(GEA)InitiativewithAgriculture(GEA)Initiative
with
 
Agriculture
?
(GEA)
?
Initiativewith
?
Agriculture
?
(GEA)
?
Initiative
Thierry Facon, FAO Bangkok
Thierry Facon, FAO Bangkok
From Rio… to RioFrom Rio… to Rio
United Nations Conference on
SustainableDevelopment
Sustainable

Development

(UNCSD) -Rio+20 Summit 
Rio, June or late 2012
World Summit on
Chapter13
Sustainable Development
(WSSD) -Rio+10
hbb
Chapter

13

(Mountains)
Chapter 14
(SARD)
UitdNtiCf
Jo
h
annes
b
urg,  Septem
b
er 2002
(SARD)
U
n
it
e
d

N
a
ti
ons
C
on
f
erence on
Environment and Development
(UNCED)
-
EarthSummit
(UNCED)

-
Earth
 
Summit
Rio, June 1992
Objective of the Rio+20 ConferenceObjective of the Rio+20 Conference
as decided by UNGAas decided by UNGA
•Secure renewed political commitment for 
sustainable development 
•Assess the progress to date and the remaining 
gaps
intheimplementationoftheoutcomesof
gaps
in
?
the
?
implementation
?
of
?
the
?
outcomes
?
of
?
the major summits on sustainable development
•Address new and emerging challenges
Themes of the Rio+20 ConferenceThemes of the Rio+20 Conference
as decided by UNGAas decided by UNGA
•A green economy in the context of sustainable 
developmentandpovertyeradication
development
?
and
?
poverty
?
eradication
•The institutional framework for sustainable 
development
development
FAO towards Rio+20FAO towards Rio+20
Rio+20 Summit (UNCSD)
Rio
,
 Ma
y
 2012
ParticipationinCBDandUNFCCC
,y
Participation
 
in
?
CBD
?
and
?
UNFCCC
Conferences of the Parties,
Nagoya, Nov. 2010; Cancun, Dec. 2010
World Summit on
d
Foo
d
 Security,
Rome, November 2009
FAO High level Conference on 
ClimateChangeandBioenergy
Climate
?
Change
?
and
?
Bioenergy
,
Rome, June 2008
FAO Preparations for Rio+20FAO Preparations for Rio+20
•New Interdepartmental Working Group (IDWG 
Rio+20) launched in July 2010, chaired by DDG‐
Knowledge;monthlymeetingssinceNovember
Knowledge;
?
monthly
?
meetings
?
since
?
November
•Contributions to UN reports for UNCSD 
(EMG/IMGSGRPC)
(EMG/IMG
?report, 
SG
?
R
eports to 
P
rep
C
oms
)
•FAO initiative on “Greenin
g
 the Econom
y
 with 
gy
Agriculture” (GEA = Earth)

NewWebsite
wwwfaoorg/rio20/fao
rio
20

New
 
Website
?: 
www
.
fao
.
org/rio20/fao

rio
?r
20
•Swiss project to support studies, meetings, etc.
Greening the EconomyGreening the Economy
with Agriculture (GEA) Initiativewith Agriculture (GEA) Initiative
Overall objective : 
Tibhdfiiid
T
o contr
ib
ute to t
h

d
e
fi
n
i
t
i
on an
d
 
implementation of the green economy in the 
context of sustainable development, food 
securit
y
 and 
p
overt
y
 alleviation throu
g
h the 
ypyg
mobilization of the food and agriculture sector
Greening the EconomyGreening the Economy
with Agriculture (GEA) Initiativewith Agriculture (GEA) Initiative
Analysis of the interactions between the green
economyandthefoodandagriculturesector
economy

and

the

food

and

agriculture

sector
,
including opportunities and constraints
Promotion of a dialogue with FAO member
countries on GEA strategies
Facilitation of the agricultural constituency
(governmentsandmajorgroups)participationin
(governments

and

major

groups)

participation

in

the global policy process of Rio+20
Adefinitionoffoodsecurity
A
 
definition
?
of
?
food
?
security
Food security is achieved “when all people, at 
alltimeshavephysicalsocialandeconomic
all
?
times

have
?
physical

social
?
and
?
economic
?
access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food 
hihhididdfd
w
hi
c
h
 meets t
h
e
i

di
etary nee
d
s an
d
 
f
oo
d
 
preferences for an active and healthy life” 
(WldFdSit1996)
(W
or
ld
 
F
oo
d
 
S
umm
it

1996)
?
The multi‐dimensional nature 
offoodsecurity
of
?
food
?
security
?
•Availability: The availability of sufficient quantities of food of appropriate 
litlidthhdtidtiit
qua
lit
y, supp
li
e
d
 
th
roug
h
 
d
omes
ti
c pro
d
uc
ti
on or 
i
mpor
t
s. 
•Access: Access by individuals to adequate resources (entitlements) for 
acquiringappropriatefoodsforanutritiousdietEntitlementsarethesetof
acquiring
?
appropriate
?
foods
?
for
?
a
?
nutritious
?
diet

Entitlements
?
are
?
the
?
set
?
of
?
all commodity bundles over which a person can establish command given 
the legal, political, economics and social arrangements of the community in 
which they live (including traditional rights such as access to common 
resources). 
bili
•Sta
bili
ty: A
population, household or individual must have access to 
adequate food at all times. They should not risk loosing access to food as a 
consequenceofsuddenshocks(eganeconomicorclimaticcrisis)or
consequence
?
of
?
sudden
?
shocks
?
(e
.
g

an
?
economic
?
or
?
climatic
?
crisis)
?
or
?
cyclical events (e.g. seasonal food insecurity). 

Utilization
:
Utilizationoffoodthroughadequatediet,cleanwater,
Utilization
:
 
Utilization
?
of
?
food
?
through
?
adequate
?
diet,
?
clean
?
water,
?
sanitation and health care to reach a state of nutritional well‐being where 
all physiological needs are met. 
GEA StudiesGEA Studies
S1. Principlesof Greening the Economy with Agriculture
S2
Availability
:LowFootprintandProductiveFoodand
S2

Availability
:
?
Low
?
Footprint
?
and
?
Productive
?
Food
?
and
?
Agriculture Systems
S3
Access
:DecentRuralLivelihoodsGreenJobsandLand
S3

Access
:
?
Decent
?
Rural
?
Livelihoods

Green
?
Jobs
?
and
?
Land
?
Tenure
S4
Stability
ResiliencetoShocksofGreenerFoodSystems
S4

Stability
:
Resilience
 
to
?
Shocks
?
of
?
Greener
?
Food
?
Systems
S5. Utilization: Quality and Health of Low Carbon Food 
Systems
S6. Policy coherence for Greening the Economy with 
Ail
A
gr
i
cu
l
ture
S7. Guidelinesfor Sustainability Assessment of Food and 
Agriculture Systems
GEA INITIATIVE
S1.
Principles
Principles
S2
S2
.
Availability
S3.
Access
S4.
Stability
S5.
Utilization
S6.
S7.
Policy
coherence
Guidelines
for SAFA
GEA Roadmap 2050GEA Roadmap 2050
FAO towards Rio+20: internal 
p
rocessFAO towards Rio+20: internal 
p
rocess
p
p
FAO’s contribution to Rio+20
Governing bodies (CFS, Council?)
d
Rome, en
d
 2011
GEA Synthesis Report 
September‐October 2011
Joint FAO/OECD Expert Meeting
Paris5

7September2011
GEAStudies
Paris

5
7
?
September
?
2011
GEA
 
Studies
?
March to July 2011
FAO towards Rio+20: external 
p
rocessFAO towards Rio+20: external 
p
rocess
p
p
IMPLEMENTATION
UNCSD (Rio+20)
RiJ2012(li2012?)
d
Ri
o, 
J
une 
2012
?
(
or 
l
ater 
i

2012?)
3r
d
UNCSD PrepCom
9‐11 May 2012
2nd
and 3rd
Intersessional Meetings
14

16November20115
?r
7March2012
14
16
?
November
?
2011

5
7
?
March
?
2012
FAO’s contribution to Rio+20
A MAJOR USER OF NATURAL RESOURCES
Agriculture and forestry manage some 60% of terrestrial resourc
e
Arable land expansion by 21% in developing countries by
2030?
2030?
Fisheries are widespread across all seas and oceans:

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オ

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

カ

ゥ



ﱬ

ゥ
Agriculture now uses some 70% of global water withdrawals:
Irri
g
ation will increase 40-47% b
y
2030 in develo
p
in
g

g
ypg
countries?
Agriculture and forestry now emit about 30% of global GHG:
By 2080, climate impact on agriculture will result in 600
million more people at risk of hunger
The impact of agriculture, forestry and fisheries is huge on
naturalresourcesandecosystemservices!
natural

resources

and

ecosystem

services!
A MAJOR PROVIDER OF LIVELIHOODS
Agriculture, forestry and fisheries currently provides 1 billion
jobs
or 3.5% of global GDP
20-50% of national GDP in developing countries



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





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ﱴ
350 million poor depend entirely on forests for daily
subsistence
subsistence
Directly and indirectly, the food and agriculture sector provides
livelihoodsfor26billionpeople(~40%ofglobalpopulation)
livelihoods

for

2
.
6

billion

people

(~

40%

of

global

population)

As the single largest sector using natural As the single largest sector using natural 
resources and providing livelihoods for 2.4 resources and providing livelihoods for 2.4 
billionpeople,thefoodandabillionpeople,thefoodanda
griculturesectorisgriculturesectoris
billion
?
people,
?
the
?
food
?
and
?
abillion
?
people,
?
the
?
food
?
and
?
a
griculture
 
sector
?
is
?
griculture
?
sector
?
is
?
critical to achieving a green economy critical to achieving a green economy 
Sustainable food and a
g
riculture 
g
systems
Good for 
N
Good for 
l
N
ature
peop
l
e
Greening the Economy
(DRAFT) GEA MESSAGES
•GEA activities on which 2.4 billion people depend for 
livelihoods,includingsustainablemanagementand
livelihoods,
?
including
?
sustainable
?
management
?
and
?
conservation of marine and forest resources, is a key driver 
in the transition towards the 
g
reen econom
y
,
 due to its 
gy
,
dual positive impact on ecosystem services and poverty 
alleviation. 
•The only response to the imperativesof climate change 
adaptation, peak oil and food price surges, alarming 
increase of nutrition‐related diseases and consumers’ 
demands for high quality and ethically produced foods.
•Can ensure sufficient quality and quantity of foodfor a 
growing global food demand within ecological boundaries, 
provided that good governance is ensured at international, 
regional, national and local levels.
(DRAFT) GEA MESSAGES
•Generates innumerable global goods and services, 
includingdecentlivelihoodsandgreenjobsand
including
?
decent
?
livelihoods
?
and
?
green
?
jobs
?
and
?
ecosystem services, especially when adequate policies 
andinvestmentsaremadetosupplypublicgoodssuch
and
?
investments
?
are
?
made
?
to
?
supply
?
public
?
goods
?
such
?
as research, extension and infrastructure.
•Establishes resilientfood and agriculture systems, based 
ondiversificationofproductionandconsumption
on
?
diversification
?
of
?
production
?
and
?
consumption
?
patterns, adaptation to climate change, terrestrial and 
marinetenuresecurityandtheempowermentof
marine
?
tenure
?
security
?
and
?
the
?
empowerment
?
of
?
farmers, herders, fishers, forest dwellers, indigenous 
communitiesandotherprimaryproducersforfacing
communities
?
and
?
other
?
primary
?
producers
?
for
?
facing
?
environmental and economic variability.
(DRAFT) GEA MESSAGES
•GEA can take many formsand expressions, depending on 
prevailing physio‐biological and socio‐political endowments, 
and is achieved by applying an ecosystem approach to 
agriculture, forestry, fisheries management  to address 
multiplesocietalneedsanddesireswithoutjeopardizing
multiple
?
societal
?
needs
?
and
?
desires

without
?
jeopardizing
?
options for future generations to benefit from a full range of 
ecosystemsgoodsandservices.
ecosystems
?
goods
?
and
?
services.
•GEA considers the multiple usesof land, water and 
bidiidh
liliifd
bi
o
di
vers
i
ty resources an
d
 t
h
e mu
l
t
i
p
li
c
i
ty o
f
 actors an
d
 
power asymmetries, including traditional and modern 
technologicalusesofnaturalresourcesandthelikely
technological
?
uses
?
of
?
natural
?
resources

and
?
the
?
likely
?
economic and social stress when uses are constrained or 
restricted.
Greening the Economy with AgricultureGreening the Economy with Agriculture
Rio+2
0
Four dimensions
of food security:
Prep‐Com III

A
vailability
•Access
Stability
FAO governing 
body
GEA

Stability
•Utilization
FAO/OECD Expert 
meeting
meeting
Four sustainability pillars:
•Environmental inte
g
rit
y
GEA Studies
gy
•Economic resilience
•Social wellbeing
IDWG Rio+20
•Good governance
wwwfaoorg/rio20
www
.
fao
.
org/rio20