Asset Management Plan

gurglejapaneseManagement

Nov 18, 2013 (3 years and 11 months ago)

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Salford City Council ©


2009
-
2010


Asset

Management

Plan


To create the best possible quality of life for the people of Salford

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INDEX



















ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN



Page





Executive Summary









2










1

Introduction










7


2

Ensuring pro
perty supports corporate and service plan objectives


8


3

Organisational arrangements for Corporate Asset Management


11



4

Partnership Working









13


5

Current property portfolio & data management





15



6

Property performance, management and monitoring




17



7

Option assessment, project appraisal and financial planning


22



8

Key Issues

and future property requirements





25








Annexes


Annex

1

Asset Management


Supporting Council Pledges

Annex

2

Aims and Objectives

Annex

3

Key
Issues

Annex

4

Asset Information

Annex

5

Performance Indicato
rs

-

performance


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ASSET

MANAGEMENT

PLAN



EXECUTIVE SUMMARY




BACKGROUND


The
council
owns
approximately 650 operational

properties (excl
uding
council
houses) It is essential that the
council’s
use, occupation and management of these
properties fully support
the
council’s
Corporate Objectives and Directorate Service
Plan requirements. To guide its asset management, a set of four property
aims and
a series o
f specific objectives have been
established with SMART targets to
measure performance and progress.


To

ensure that asset management planning involves the whole
council
a
One
Council Management Team

is in operation and a Corporate Proper
ty Unit acts as a
focus and catalyst to raise and promote consideration of corporate property issues.
The Lead Member for Property who is also Deputy Leader of the
council
takes an
active role in strategic
property
matters
.


The
council
is committed to it
s asset management activity supporting better services
and delivering improved outcomes for the people of Salford.



ACHIEVEMENTS


Some of our
recent
ach
ievements are illustrated below:


Provision of better office space in fewer buildings


The office accom
modation strategy has
improved space occupancy and provided
better working environments for staff. Appropriate working environments aid staff
productivity, motivation
, recruitment and

retention that
support

delivery of quality
services.


Office
rationalis
ation and disposal of surplus accommodation has generated capital
receipts of circa £2.7
7
M to date and running cost
of closed buildings
of
circa
£5
20
,000 per annum

(at year of closure) saved.


Access for disabled people


More buildings are now accessible
with the provision of ramps
automatic doors accessible toilets and other access
improvements. The number of accessible buildings has
increased from four in 2001 to
eighty one

in 200
8

and
71
% of
the Council’s public access buildings are now accessible.
Th
rough our actions

there is increasing
accessibility

to our
properties for a wider range of people.

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Customer Service and Information


The council working with the P
rimary
C
are
T
rust

have opened three Gateway Centres at
Walkden, Eccles and
Pendleton
. These

centres represent a step change in the
delivery of services and information to the
resident of Salford.


The innovative service model
blends in
varying degrees the interface between health
and social care. The scale of this integration extends from shared

facilities to the
development of ‘
front
-
of
-
house’ services, which receive and manage attendances
and enquiries
on

a wide range of issues spanning local authority and health care
services.


Regeneration


MediaCityUK


The
council

has been fully engaged in

securing the MediaCityUK development in
Salford
.
This
development

provides the
opportunity to make a

real difference for
our communities and to create tangible
opportunities for our residents. As part of
the MediaCityUK Public Sector Partner
(PSP) progra
mme, Salford City Council is
involved the development of the site and its
transport infrastructure to create an accessible investor, visitor and employee
destination. In addition, we are using this
major

development as a catalyst to raise
the profile of Sa
lford, to raise aspirations and to create job opportunities for local
residents.


The development will ultimately span a 200
-
acre site, creating seven million square
feet of business, residential and retail floorspace
,

employment for over 15,000
people, an
d provide opportunities for more than 1,000 businesses. Phase one is due
to open in 2011.


Carbon Management Plan


The

council
recognises its important role in responding to the challenges of climate
change. Reducing the city’s carbon footprint and adaptin
g to the impacts of climate
change is understood as an important part of the council’s role in community
leadership and forms part of the city’s Local Area Agreement (LAA).


The

council
was selected in 2008, amidst strong competition, to take part in
The
C
arbon Management Programme and our
Carbon Management Plan commits the
council to a target of reducing
CO
2

emissions

by 40% by 2013
that

underpins
potential financial savings of around £13.3

million.





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Libraries & Museums


S
ignificant
improvement
s

have

been

achieved with the
re
-
opening of

the
refurbished
and improved

Little Hulton Library and the
opening of the libraries in the Walkden
,
Eccles

and Pendleton

Gateway centres. Little
Hulton
now

provides
improved access

and
facilities

for disabled visitors,

enhanced
community facilities, and completely new
children’s and adult library space. The
Gateway centres likewise have provided to
opportunity to provide new library customer
experiences as part of the community
services offered in these developments.

Th
ese schemes will encourage and enable
more people of all ages to benefit from a range of literacy, learning, information
services and activities on offer in the libraries.


The restoration of Ordsall Hall has moved significantly forward
. Work

due for
comp
letion
in 2011 will cement Ordsall Hall as one of the
city
’s main visitor
attractions and support regeneration through the provision of a community
-
learning
centre and as a venue for a range of community events and activities
.


Project planning for the res
toration of Salford Museum and Art Gallery is continuing,
and subject to funding and other approvals, it is expected the project will commence
in 2011 and be completed in 2014.


Leisure

and Community

Centres


Fit City Ordsall
has

undergone

significant impr
ovement. This

development
along

with
others
are planned to improve the health and well
-
being of Salford’s citizens through
encouraging and improving access to healthy recreation and physical activity.


T
he
management
of
Community Centres
has been

transferr
ed to Salford Community
Leisure

which through active management and developments will increase utilisation
and community value delivered by these buildings
.


Adult Social Care


The major project to convert White Meadows into what will become the Humphrey
B
ooth Resource Centre for older people with mental health disabilities commenced
in November

2008.

The new Centre
,

scheduled to open in October 2009
,

will
provide an innovative, welcoming and stimulating environment for service users and
their carers.


The

creation of the Integrated Care Teams has taken place throughout 2008 with five
now set up in both
council
and Primary Care Trust buildings. Plans for the remaining
three teams are well advanced and will be completed during 2009.


The relocation of the Le
arning Difficulties Team to Crompton House was achieved in
May and this allowed the closure of the poor quality White Moss House where anti
-
social behaviour by sections of the community added to the buildings’ many
problems.


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The re
-
modelling of St George’
s Day Centre
has
commence
d

and this will provide
modern and accessible facilities for people with learning difficulties.


Substantial investment has been made in Holly Bank to provide refurbished
accommodation for its residents and this and other spending
in other residential and
day
-
care buildings has continued to be made to ensure the Directorate’s high
standards and service delivery objectives were met.


Schools




T
wo

more
high schools moved into new P
FI buildings during August 2008.

The
condition of ot
hers together with access for disabled people also improved.

A new

Roman C
atholic primary school

opened
in September 2008, to replace three
schools, suffering from falling pupil rolls
and with

buildings that were past economic
repair.


Improvements to su
itability, quality and condition of school buildings are supporting
improved education outcomes with significant improvement in pupil attainment being
achieved over the last 4 years, Salford now achieves above the national average for
5+ A
-
C at GCSE.




Ho
using


T
he council has
completed a
Large
-
scale Voluntary Transfer of 14,697 houses in
West Salford to a new Registered Social Landlord


City West Housing Trust.


This will release the necessary funding to deliver
City
West’s

decent homes
investment progr
amme.


In the Precinct area of Central Salford
,
success in PFI round 5

bids has secured
£121 million of PFI credits. Procurement is now underway for a PFI partner with work
scheduled to commence in 2011.


In
the rest of
Central Salford the A
rms
L
ength
M
an
agement
O
rganisation
,

(Salix

Homes)

anticipates a successful

inspection in 2009 which

will bring round 6
ALMO funding of

up to £68.9m.


A further bid for £100m has been made under PFI round 6 for the Islington Estate.




Children’s Centres


T
he
coun
cil
has an ambitious programme for the construction of children’s centres
across Salford.


The first two phases of works saw the completion of fifteen centres and a further
three are planned in the next phase. These centres are moving towards the delivery
of a one
-
stop
-
shop of integrated services for the families of children under 5, bringing
together, adult education and employment advice, health and family support
combined with high quality integrated education and child care for pre
-
school
children. The
centres will also provide information for families and’ joined
-
up’
services that are readily accessible and suited to the needs of the community.


The Salford Strategic Partnership



The Salford Strategic Partnership’s (SSP) vision for the
city

is clearly
defined in

Making the Vision Real


the Community Plan for Salford 2006
-
16
,

which sets out
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the strategic vision for Salford around
seven

themes. This is underpinned by three
strategic plans;
The Salford Agreement 200
8
-
201
1
, The Central Salford Vision and
Regeneration Framework and the Salford West Strategic Regeneration Framework
and Action Plan. These plans have been developed in partnership with key
stakehol
ders from the community, public and voluntary agencies and the private
sector to ensure a comprehensive and holistic approach to the regeneration of the
city.


The SSP has also developed the Salford Agre
ement, our Local Area Agreement

as
the key vehicle fo
r delivering their
vision
. It seeks to
address local priorities that
will
make
the most

difference to the quality of life in our

communities.



The
LAA

sets challenging targets to be

achieved

between now and March 2011. The
LAA

will

develop the city’s publ
ic services and in turn help

local people to achieve
their ambitions.


PROPERTY
PERFORMANCE


An essential element of asset management is maintaining accurate data. As well as
maintaining up to date information on ownership, size and user, the
council
als
o
collects and
uses
appropriate performance data
.


Backlog maintenance is a challenge
that

is being addressed through
significant
capital investment in
Schools, Highways, Housing and operational buildings
,

which is
reducing backlog maintenance.




S
ignific
ant Performance improvements have been achieved

in other areas.

Overall,
the
council
now holds less prop
erty assets than it did in 2000
.

Office
occupancy
levels have improved with space utilisation targets now being

broadly

met. Where
moves are taking pla
ce,
the quality

of office accommodation is being improved,
providing open plan flexible offices,

capable of accommodating future change.




FUTURE

PROPERTY

REQUIREMENTS


The asset management planning process clearly identifies the
council’s
future
property

requirements.

Key corporate issues are the provision of appropriate office
accommodation and responding to sustainability and climate change.


The Office Accommodation Strategy and programme of o
f
fice moves will continue in
2009/10 to support service chan
ge and the ‘Think Efficiency’ agenda.

This will
maintain the programme of
refurbishment to provide modern fle
xible open plan
accommodation,
space occupancy reduction and the disposal of surplus property.
Refurbishments will
also

support

th
e requirements o
f agile working
, which is now
being introduced.


The
C
ouncil has set a challenging
CO
2

reduction target. Our Carbon Management
Plan sets out a series of property measures to contribute to the reduction required.


The development of Service Property Strateg
ies (SPS’s) is assisting service
managers to identify the changes

in service property
required to support efficient and
effective service delivery. T
hese

property requirements

and projects

are set out in
Annex

3

of the A
sset Manag
ement Plan
.





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CONCLUSION


Asset Management Planning has moved on from developing the necessary
processes and procedures for good asset management to ensuring that effective
asset management is delivering better outcomes for the people of Salford.


The
council’s
priorities are clearly stated and asset management activity is
delivering
changes

across the property portfolio to assist these priorities.


Significant progress has been made and there is clarity about what needs to be
achieved. This view is s
upported by the
Audit Commission

C
omprehensive
P
erformance
A
ssessment

judgement on how Salford manages its property assets,
which is a

rating

3 out of 4, ‘consistently abov
e minimum requirements


performing
well’

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ASSET

MANAGEMENT

PLAN




1.

INTRODUCTION



Property is a key corporate resource and the occupation of property is fundamental
to the delivery of the
council’s
services. The
council

owns approximately 650
operation
al
properties and i
t is essential that the
council’s
use, occupation and
management of these properties fully support the
council’s
Corporate Objectives and
Directorate Service Plan requirements.




Asset Management in it’s wider sense, needs to be seen as

a contributor to core
business resource planning so as to ensure that the physical asset base is aligned
with organisational objectives
.
1



In Salford a
sset management planning

activity

involves all of the
council’s
directorates, supported by the operatio
n of the
One Council
Management
Team,
The
Corporate

Property Unit (CPU), and the role and function of the Lead Member for
Property.






Effective asset management is helping to deliver change and improving outcom
es


for the people of Salford
. Key

achieve
ments and

outcomes in 2008
-
09 are

as



illustrated
in
the
Executive Summary.




1

Report on improving the capability and capacity of managing property assets in central civil government, OGC
2006 (Andrew Howarth, National School of Government for OGC)

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2


ENSURING

PROPERTY

SUPPORTS

CORPORATE

AND SERVICE PLAN



OBJECTIVES


2.1

Corporate Objectives


Property owned or occupied by the
council
must be used and managed efficiently

an
d

effectively to support the
council
in achieving its Mission
, which is:


“To create the best possible quality of life for the people of Salford”



and realise its Vision which is that

:



in 2016 Salford will be a beautiful and welcoming city, driven by
en
ergetic and
engaged communities of highly skilled, healthy and motivated citizens who have built
a diverse and prosperous culture and economy which encourages and recognises
the contribution of everyone, for everyone

.


To assist the
council
in achieving

its Mission and realise its vision the
council
has
made seven pledges to all the people of Salford
. These Pledges, which were
adopted in 2004, are the
council’s
priorities for both statutory and local service
delivery. The Pledges and their ‘high level’ l
inks to asset management are set out

in
Annex

1
.


These pledges also underpin the
council’s

Corporate Plan
,

which explains how the
council will contribute to the Salford Strategic Partnerships priorities for improvement
across the

city.



2.2

Property Aims and Objectives


I
n order to guide its management, use and occupation of property to support the
delivery of its mission and pledges the
council
has established a set of four property
aims

and

a series of specific property objectives
supporting each aim.


Whilst t
he
council’s
mission and pledges do not provide a direct route to defining
property aims and objectives
,

achieving its mission and pledges require
s

the
provision of high quality services accessible to all people.


Being able t
o provide
such
high quality
services is the product of high quality staff, good support infrastructure,
sound management and the efficient use of resources.


This has implications for

the council’s operational

property in terms of its amount,
type, size, l
ocation condition and suitability to support efficient and effective service
delivery. The
council’s
property can also be used to stimulate and promote
regen
eration and attract investment and provide income

or capital

to support the
council’s
revenue
or c
apital budgets.


T
he

four

property aims as set out below:





To p
rovide property to meet corporate and service directorate requirements as
efficiently, and economically as possible to enhance service provision for the
people of Salford.



To ensure that prope
rty is fully recognised as a corporate asset and that it is
managed accordingly.



To ensure that the investment portfolio provides both income and capital to
help to support the c
ouncil’s budgetary requirements; and

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To ensure that where appropriate the coun
cil’s property is used to support
urban regeneration initiatives and community well being.


The

detailed
objectives

to support these aims
a
re

set
in
Annex

2
.


2.3

Financial Context


The
council’s
medium term financial strategy (MTFS)
aims to ensure that financial
resources are utilised efficiently, economically and effectively to enable the
council’s
vision for the city to be delivered and sustained. The key compone
nts of the MTFS
are as follows:




T
o ensure
council
priori
ties and the
budget are aligned
;



T
o meet continuing commitments from ava
ilable resources
;



T
o limit
council
tax increases to no more than 3 per cent per annum for
Salford services
; and



T
o achieve annual efficiency savings in line with Gershon principles, i.e.
a
minimum
of 3% cashable efficiencies per annum for each of the next thr
ee
years
.


Consequently service ambition and property requirements need to be carefully
considered and prioritised and, so far as its asset base is concerned, land and
buildings need to be occup
ied and managed as efficiently and effectively as possible.


The strategy towards the use of capital receipts has been superseded by a
dependence on the temporary use of unsupported borrowing to finance the capital
programme as a result of the economic dow
nturn during 2008, which has caused a
rapid deterioration in developer confidence and consequently a depression in

land
and building
values locally. The falling away of land values has led to sites available
for disposal not being brought to market because

offers have not represented good
value and a tactical decision has been taken to hold onto such sites until value
returns.

The first call upon any capital receipts that can be raised in the current
climate where good value can be demonstrated or where the

council
is committed to
sell, e.g. under right
-
to
-
buy legislation,

is now towards the repayment of unsupported
borrowing and this strategy will continue until value from disposals returns and the
debt can be fully repaid.


This depression

in values is ref
lected in the
target for capital receipts from the sal
e of
surplus assets for 2008/09

being reduced from £23m of useable capital receipts to a
usable receipt of approximately £2.744m.




In 2008/09, the c
ouncil’s property portfolio

generate
d
income of a
pproximately £3.
7
M
to support the revenue budget.
The target for 2009/10 is 3.45M.


2.4

Service Property Strategies


To ensure that property supports individual service plan objectives the C
orporate
P
olicy
U
nit

works closely

with service directorates to
produc
e

service property
strategies (SPS’s). In developing these Service Property Strategies consideration

is

given to:




Where each service is going and where it thinks it might be in 5 years time
;



Particular changes in service delivery, which will affect accom
modation
;



Possible changes in staff
numbers
;



The impact of partnership working on the service
;



The impact of any outsourcing of the service
; and

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12



Property performance
utilisation and value for money;




The way in which the service will be influenced by wider

corporate initiatives
;



Current problems with services existing property portfolio in meeting current

service

needs;



Changes required in the portfolio for the future
; and



S
upport
ing

business continuity plans.


The SPS’s set out the vision for a particular

service, its property and performance in
terms of running costs, condition, backlog maintenance and D
isability Discrimination
Act

compliance and identifies the changes to the portfolio that are planned. As
SPS’s are reviewed and updated

performance measu
re
s

to

assess

utilisation and
the ‘value for money’ given by each property

are being developed
.


The service property strategies form a


bridge


between service plans and the
corporate Asset Management Plan (AMP). The corporate AMP sets out the key
issues

affecting the
council
in
Section 8

and both Directorate and corporate property
issues are set out in the table at
Annex

3
.


This table has been developed from the key property issues table in the
200
8
/
0
9

AMP. Matters that have been dealt with since last year have been removed and new
issues added.


The table shows the current position together with future action and timescales. This
is a shorthand summary of the
key property issues and their current s
tatus
which
acts as a quick reference point

enabling
progress in delivery

to

be monitored and any
problems or areas where additional action is required
to

be identified.


Housing, Education and Transport requirements are
set out and
dealt with in detail in

their respective Plans and Programmes.


2.5

CPA
, CAA

and Best Value


CPA

and its development t
o Comprehensive Area Assessment

(CAA)

is placing
greater emphasis on how
council’s

manage their asset base. Within the CPA
/
CAA

process, Audit Commission Inspectors
make an assessment of how well the
management of property assets
is
linked into corporate and service strategic
planning
. An expected pre requisite is that
asset management is supported by
appropriate systems
,

processes and practices.
The new CAA

assessmen
ts place
i
ncreasing importance
on joining up the council’s asset management activities with
that of other public bodies,
the need to demonstrate improved service outcomes
for
residents and services users
and value for money in
the
management and use of
pro
perty. In the last CPA assessment
, ‘use

of resources’ was awarded a 3 star
rating out of 4.

See

Audit Commission website

external

site
.


The most significant Best Value review in terms of impact on property
was

the best
value review of Property and Asset Management. The completion of this review
made a positive contribution to asset management planning and
was

particularly
useful
in
establishing the Corporate Property Unit and
driving improvement in the
performance of the
council’s
office portfolio
see
section 6.3
.




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3


ORGANISATIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR CORPORATE ASSET




MANAGEMENT


Asset Management and

its planning
must

involve the whole

council

organisation not
just property managers. To ensure that this takes place Salford has put in place the
arrangement set out below
.


3.1


The

One
Council

Management Team (OCMT)


OCMT was
established in October 2007
. I
t
’s
terms of reference include the strategic
management of the
council's
property portfolio and development of the asset
management plan and
financial strategy. It

meets regularly on a 2
-
weekly cycle and
makes

recommendations regarding
strategic asset manag
ement
to the Corporate
Management Team, Lead Member for Property and Cabinet, as appropriat
e.




An annual work programme has been established to enable OCMT to fulfil its



property functions, which includes the following:


Consider corporate
Annual
AMP
update

Once in year

Consider property performance


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The programme is to be developed to include the scrutiny and challenge of SPS’s.



3.2


Corporate Property Unit (CPU)


The CPU

located within the Sustainable Regeneration Directorate

was es
tablished in
2000 as a result of the
council’s
Best Value Review of office accommodation and
strategic property management. The
unit
is headed by
the
council’s
Corporate
Property
Manager

(CPM).

The

unit is a corporate resource. It acts as a catalyst to
ra
ise and promote consideration of corporate property issues and holds and
maintains property data and performance information.

The
unit
is responsible for
raising the profile of property and property performance and for developing and
improving strategic

a
sset

ma
nagement activities.

The
council’s

Corporate Property
Officer (CPO) is the Director of Sustainable Regeneration.


3.3


Lead Member for Property


The
council
has a
Lead Member f
or P
roperty
. His cr
oss cutting role and
responsibilities have been defined and agreed by Cabinet.


The Lead Member has monthly meetings with the C
orporate
P
olicy
M
anager

and key
officers from the property division and C
orporate
P
olicy
U
nit

to receive reports

on
corporate or

strategic property issues

and is briefed on and considers other property
matters.






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14

3.4


The Delivery of Property Services t
hrough other Service Providers


In 2005 the
council
established

a joint venture partnership company,
Urban Vision
Partnership

Limited, with Capita Symonds plc and Morrison

Construction

plc.
To
provide

property, design, maintenance, highways and planning services
.



In 2007
the council established
Salix Homes an Arms Length M
anagement
O
rga
nisation which manages the majority of the
council’s

housing stock
. In addition a
small number of dwellings are

also

managed by the Barracks T
enant
M
anagement
O
rganisation and the Windsor Albion

Tenant Management Organisation
.



4


PARTNERSHIP WORKING


Par
tnership working and consultation
are

important element
s

in
the
asset
management planning
process.


4.1


Strategic

Partnership Working


At a strategic level the Salford Strategic Partnership (SSP) brings together key
agencies across the public, private, commun
ity and voluntary sectors to promote and
develop close collaborative working and has been responsible for the development
of the Community Plan and the Local Area Agreement, known as the Salford
Agreement
.


The Partnership’s second Community Plan, publishe
d in 2005, helps the
council
and
its partners to make the best possible use of public sector assets in order to tackle
the crosscutting priorities facing our city in a strategic, partnership based and
comprehensive manner. The Community Plan is currently b
eing revised in response
to Government guidance to produce a Sustainable Community Strategy, with a target
publication date of May 2009.


The Partnership has also developed its second Local Area Agreement (LAA)
-

the
Salford Agreement as the key vehicle fo
r delivering the Community Plan Vision. It
seeks to
address those local priorities that will make the most difference to the
quality of life in our communities. The Agreement was signed off by central
government in June 2008. It sets out the 23 priority is
sues which will be at the centre
of the
council’s
business


and that of our partners. These include concerns about
the level of
Worklessness

and anti
-
social behaviour, opportunities for residents at
MediaCityUK and issues over health. Success on issues su
ch as these will make a
major difference to people’s lives.


4.2


Shared Use

of Buildings


The inter
-
agency approach to service delivery has, in the interest of co
-
ordination
and efficiency led to numerous examples of the shared use of buildings. This is
part
icularly so in the Community, Health & Social Care Directorate where there are
many examples, notably with Salford PCT and the Greater Manchester West NHS
Mental Health Trust. This trend was further developed during 2008 with the setting
up of five Integra
ted Care Teams, comprising community nursing staff, social
workers and community assessment officers, across the city. Plans for the remaining
three Teams will come to fruition in 2009
. In addition proposals to form a partnership
with Disabled Living, a re
gistered charity, will see them relocating and sharing space
at Burrows House with the council. The Gateway centres have also been
successfully established.


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15

T
he targets

set in the LAA may
require
further
service integration with subsequent
impact on accom
modation. In particular, a strong focus on promoting ‘working
neighbourhoods’ in the most deprived parts of the city, through better integrated
public service delivery may stimulate
further
sharing accommodation by partner
agencies during 2009/10.


4.3


Transf
er of assets to the community


In addition to sharing buildings the government is encouraging the transfer of assets
to the ‘Third Sector’ as a way of
dev
eloping and delivering services and

in supporting
sustainable communities
.


The governments approach i
s set out in the
Quirk review
.



The council is currently working with partners to develop a policy on asset transfer.
This will take the council from its current position of an ad hoc approach, with
opportunities being considered when they present themsel
ves, to a clear policy and
framework for engagement with the community
.


4.4


Local

Consultation


At the local level partnership working was established within communities with the
establishment of Community Committees in 1992 enabling local people to particip
ate
in the decisions directly affecting them. This has been supported by the introduction
of locally based neighbourhood management Teams.


Community Action Plans outlining local priorities, developed by the community, feed
directly into the Community Plan
. Regeneration schemes such as the New Deal for
Communities programme in Charlestown/Kersal promote local partnership working
within communities, with local people directly involved in the management structures
established within them.


Both the Central S
alford Vision and Regeneration Framework and the Salford West
Strategic Regeneration Framework were widely consulted on during their
development.


This is being built on with on
-
going involvement in delivery of the
programmes.


Wide consultation informed

‘Building Schools for the Future’ proposals, the
‘Primary Capital Programme, Education Asset Management Plan and Schools
Organisational Plan. This also links to the statutory consultation process for
school re
-
organisations.


The results of consultation a
nd partnership working inform regeneration initiatives,
service developments and planning. Implications for the
council’s
operational
properties are reflected in individual service property strategies. Key issues are
reflected in
Section 8

and
Annex

3

of the AMP.









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1
6



5


CURRENT PROPERTY

PORTFOLIO
& DATA MANAGEMENT


5.1

Existing Portfolio


The
council
owns in excess of 700

operational and non operational

properties
(excluding
council
houses) with a net
book value of approximately £326m. Details of
the portfolio, the number of assets,
floor
areas and
value are set out in
Annex

4
.



The CPU maintains a property database that holds core and
transient

data on all the
council’s
prop
erty, which brings information together from a range of sources. The
portfolio is clearly defined and has been categorised into the CIPFA categories.


5.2

Changes in Portfolio


The
council’s
portfolio continues to change as property is better aligned with ser
vice
delivery needs
.

The
council
also

pursues

an

active acquisition and disposal
programme
that

supports its urban regeneration objectives.


A summary of the changes
i
n the portfolio from April 200
7

to
March

200
8

are set out
below.
Surplus Property is
identified and dealt with in accordance with the
council’s
surplus property policy





























.

CIPFA CAT

No of
Assets

Building Area
(GIA) Sq.M

Comments

Operational

Other Land &
Buildings

+43

-
462.19

The increase
in the number of

assets is principally due to a
trans
fer of

miscellaneous

park
buildings

from community to this
category. In addition a number of
park
buildings

have been
separately identified.


Community

+17

-
246.83

Notwithstanding a transfer of
the
miscellaneous park buildings
to the
‘Other Land and Bui
ldings category’
The number of assets
h
as
increased due to a number of
landscaping

assets
being

separately identified.

Non
-
Operational

General

+26

-
462.95

The increase in number of assets
reflects the grant of new income
producing leases / tenancies of
land for miscellaneous purposes.

Surplus

+16

-
1100.99

The increase in the number of
assets

h
as resulted from the
identification of small separate
parcels of land in West Salford
resulting from the CWHT stock
transfer.


TOTALS


Plus 102


M
inus 2,272.96


* Whilst the number of assets has increased this is essentially the result of the
separate identification of existing land assets. The number of buildings and
building area has reduced

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5.3

Data Management


The need for accur
ate and up to date property data underpins effective asset
management
.



Core Data

The
council’s
property terrier records all
core data, including a CIPFA property
categorisation and a description of the function of the property.



Transient Data

In additi
on to the core data t
he CPU
collects and holds the transient
performance
data
which

is required to support
property PI’s,

and benchmarking

which can

be
used to improve performance. This transient performance
data supports

the national
property PI’s and the

council’s
local property PI’s that have been derived from the
corporate aims and objectives for property.


This transient data, e.g. running costs, occupancy levels and condition is reviewed
and updated annually. From the core and transient data, a range

of reports can be
produced

on the performance of the
council’s
portfolio.


The validity of the core and transient data is tested. The data held on the database is
checked against and reconciled with primary source data. In updating records,
information is

received and checked. The data is checked and verified through its
use in supporting PI’s, providing data to benchmarking groups and also through
condition surveys and Target Setting. Whilst there is no formal audit of the data
these processes ensure that

the data is firmly based and accurate.




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6


PROPERTY

PERFORMANCE, MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING


The CPU continues to raise
the importance and awareness of
property


performance

through
its work

with directorates and reports to
OCMT

and

Members
.


6.1


Perfo
rmance Indicators


The council has adopted the new t
he suite of
n
ational property performance indictors

introduced by
g
overnment as part of their initiative to improve
council’s

asset
management planning
.

These PI’s exclude housing stock.


The

indicators

are further sub divided into suites of more detailed indicators. The
council is currently collecting the information required to support the seven high level
indicators

and these are commented on in
section 6.3
. The
council

is c
onsidering the
requirements and usefulness of the more detailed suites.



W
e
also
have a suite of local PI’s which measure performance
of

the
council’s
office
accommodation and performance within the
council’s

industrial portfolio
that is

reported and moni
tored on a quarterly basis.


6.2


Performance Reporting

and
Benchmarking


Performance
in relation to property PI’s is
reported annually to OCMT and the Lead
Member for Property. This performance is shown in

summary in

Annex

5
.
The
co
uncil
uses the results of this performance monitoring to improve future
performance
.


Property performance information which includes annual running costs, backlog
maintenance
,

condition category, and DDA issues is included within Service Property
Strategi
es (SPS’s) Property utilisation and value for money data is being developed.
This will relate running costs to business unit transactions (e.g. books lent/enquires
handled & usage or hours of opening, number of users
) which

is recognised as an
important el
ement of effective asset management planning.


Directors are made aware of their respective office occupancy levels set against the
council’s
corporate targets.
This p
erformance is also reported to the OCMT,
CMT

and the Lead Member for Property.


Salford

c
ompares is performance with

that of other local authorities through IPF’s
Asset Management Network.
This comparison and benchmarking is used to identify
areas of weak performance so that improvement measures can be put in place.


In addition
Salford
is le
ading work to compare property holdings and value related to
population across the Greater Manchester Authorities. Results of this work will be
available this year.




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6.3


Property Performance

-

Achievements
and
Issues


Sufficiency of operational office

property


The Best Value review of property in 2000 defined the
council’s

first

office
accommodation strategy and set out an improvement plan. Significant improvements
in p
erformance have been achieved:




Number of buildings

covered by the plan

reduced fr
om 50 to 31
;



Floor area reduced from 48,538
M
2

to 32,339

M
2
;



Occupancy improved from 19.6M
2

per person to
a current figure of
11.
09
M
2

per person
;



Disposal of surplus office buildings has generated capital receipts of £2.7
7

Million
; and



Running costs of clo
sed buildings
of

circa
£5
20
,000 per annum (at year of
closure) saved
.


The council is now
implementing a

new strategy and
rationalisation programme
coupled with the introduction of agile working, recognising the differences between
fixed flexible and mobil
e workers and the changes necessary to the physical office
environment. The council has set a new target of 9M
2

per person overall and a
target of 8M
2

person where staff moves and office refurbishments take place.



Building Condition
and
Required Mainten
ance (b
acklog
)


The condition of

all council assets is assessed, with a five year rolling programme of
reassessments

to enable the data to be updated annually.



The total backlog maintenance figures for the main service areas are set out in
the table belo
w.


Housing (Dwelling/other
buildings)


£
104
M

*
Represents Decent Homes
failure values as at April 2007

Education (Schools)

£30
M


All other Services

£12.16
M

Transport

£100M



Addressing this backlog is a substantial challenge. Information on backlog a
nd
how this is being addressed is set out
overleaf
.

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Housing


The housing options appraisal conducted between 2003 and 2005 identified that the
council
did not have sufficient resources to bring its properties up to the Decent
Homes standard. Given the l
evel of capital investment required and the negative
value of the
council’s
housing stock, no single option would have provided the
resources needed to achieve the Decent Homes target and a sustainable Housing
Revenue Account (HRA) in the medium to long te
rm. A mixed model investment
strategy was identified to secure the additional funding required. This consists of a
new Local Housing Company (City West Housing Trust (CWHT)) for homes in West
Salford, which transferred in October 2008
,

a
n

A
rms
L
ength
M
anag
ement
O
rganisation

(Salix Homes) for tenants in Central Salford, Rainsough Brow and the
Beech
farm estate (Swinton) which was
launched

in July 2007 and a Private Finance
Initiative for properties in Pendleton.


A stock condition survey for the city was c
onducted in 2006.The sample survey
(15% of properties within each area) provided an indication as to the total forecast
expenditure to improve and maintain the stock over the next 30
-
years, including a
breakdown of the investment required to achieve the De
cent Homes Standard over
the next five years. A further 100% survey of the Pendleton area was completed in
2007.


The survey reports. concluded that although the
council’s
properties had been
reasonably well maintained within available resources, the non
-
decency rates were
48% for the

A
rms
L
ength
M
anagement
O
rganisation

area, and 50% for the P
rivate
F
inance
I
nitiative

area. In addition a significant number of major components either
have reached or are near to reaching the end of their economic life and
will require
replacement in the short term.


Schools


The condition of all secondary schools was resurveyed during 2006 and primary
schools during 2007 and the Education A
sset
M
anagement
P
lan

updated
accordingly. These resurveys identified a maintenance ba
cklog of
£30
M


Salford
replaced

two high schools with new build via a
P
rivate
F
inance
I
nitiative
in
2008

and

we
now

have a total of five high schools that have been procured via
P
rivate
F
inance
I
nitiative
.


A further high school
,
Hope High
,
has closed
and
reopen
ed

in its current building as an Academy. However, the school will be rebuilt
on a site
at Salford Quays,

as part of the BSF programme.


The rest of the secondary school estate will be catered for via, the ‘Building Schools
for the Future’ programme.

(BSF) Salford is in the third wave of BSF, which means
contract signature for delivery will be signed
in 2009. These proposals will result in a
further
seven

new build high schools opening by September 2012.


In the primary sector, we have plans to replac
e four community schools with two
new builds, also, the RC Diocese
has

secured agreement to close five primary
schools and replace with one new school in Little Hulton and one new school in
Langworthy. The school in Little
Hulton

opened

in September 2008.
The funds for
the two new RC school s will be provided by a combination of DfES capital grant and
capital receipts provided by both the Diocese and the city
council
.


The next major DCSF capital investment programme will cater for the primary school
estate
. The
Primary Capital Programme (PCP),

will be a fourteen year programme
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21

and the funds will be available as from 2009/2010.
Salford has been notified that its
allocation for 2009/10 will be £4.1M
. However, unlike the BSF programme, funds will
only be provi
ded to replace or refurbish 50% of the primary schools. This additional
funding, plus the capital investment strategy we already have in place for our
primary schools will, along with BSF, accelerate the reduction to the condition
backlog and should remove

all current suitability issues in high school buildings and
address a significant proportion of those primary schools with the highest levels of
both condition and suitability issues.


Other Operational and Non
-
Operational Property


To assess the conditio
n of its operational and non
-
operational property the council
has a 5
-
year rolling programme of surveys,
with 20% of the portfolio being
inspected
every year.
This survey enables the cost of backlog maintenance to be assessed
and buildings to be categoris
ed in to four condition categories as follows


A=Good,
B=Satisfactory, C=Poor, D=Bad

performance is set out in
Annex

4
.


Comparison with other local authorities indic
ates that the condition of the c
ouncil’s
property is worse th
an average.
It is the
council’s

objective to maintain its
operational portfolio in at least satisfactory condition. Whilst condition is improving
this objective has not yet been met.



T
he estimated cost of backlog maintenance for
2007/08

is £
12.
16
M.
Th
is is small
reduction from
t
he previous

year (£
12.27
M)

but a significant reduction from 2001/02
baseline figure of £16.59M.


This reduction in backlog
and improvement in building condition
is
primarily
the

result of
the
disposal of assets with large backlo
g

figures and capital investment
from both internal and external funding streams
invested in building improvement
and refurbishment schemes.


Recent schemes include replacing with double glazed units the windows at the
Crompton Hse and T
urnpike Hse core of
fice sites, h
eating plant and boiler
replacement at Minerva Hse, Unity Hse and Swinton Town Hall core office sites and
dealing with backlog within the refurbishment and improvement of Fit City Ordsall
and Eccles.



The c
ouncil’s
ongoing
strategy to deal wi
th the backlog maintenance

and building
condition

is
the continued
combination of further rationalisation of the buil
dings and
disposal of surplus assets
,

and investing both c
ouncil and external capital resources
into building improvement and refurbishment

schemes.


Highways

infrastructure


Significant progress has been made over the last year in developing the transport
Asset Management Plan and transport health and safety file information including an
inventory of all highway assets and a more detailed as
sessment of highways
backlog maintenance. The total highways backlog maintenance is estimated at
£100m, comprising £65m for classified roads and £35m for side roads with a
requirement for £17m to fund an initial five
-
year plan.


We are currently in the fo
urth year of a five year £22M investment programme
to
improve the condition of

highways and
footpaths
delivered through Urban

Vision
Partnership Ltd
and
financed through prudential borrowing.


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22

Environmental property issues


Energy, Water Consumption and
C
O
2



emissions


Government is placing an increasing emphasis on the need for local authorities to

manage their assets sustainably
. The energy, water consumption and
CO
2

emissions from
council
buildings is measured and analysed. The
council’s
water
consump
tion is reasonable and
CO
2

emissions appear slightly higher than average
from benchmarking with other authorities. The council does invest in energy
efficiency measures target
ed

at poorly performing assets. The
council’s
5 year
Carbon Management
Plan has d
emonstrated the significant potential for reducing
carbon emissions from the
council’s

operational estate

and the very significant
savings that will result.



see section 8
. A target to reduce
CO
2

emissions by 40% by
2013 has been agreed.




Accessibility
to buildings for disabled people


The
council
has a programme to improve access to services in public access
buildings for disabled people. This programme has
improved access in
81

of the
114

public access

buildings.

The
council
is performing reasonably in

compa
rison to our
family authorities but continued investment through the capital programme will be
required.


Time and Cost Predictability in delivery capital schemes


The
council
has adopted a policy of procuring it’s construction work through
partneri
ng with contractors (as apposed to
competitive tendering
)

Whilst direct
comparison between tendering and partnering cannot be made with the data
available, i
t appears that substantial improvements in time predictability performance
have been made
, a
nd perf
ormance now compares well against other authorities.
However cost predictability

at both the design and post construction phases does
not
yet
show the same improvement
.




Property running costs as a percentage of gross revenue budget and cost

per M²

Pr
operty running costs as a percentage of the gross revenue budget is a new
performance indicator. Running costs per M² have been collected for sometime and
provide valuable information in assessing VFM and retention or disposal of assets.


Building
Suitabi
lity


proportion of buildings assessed


This is an entirely new performance indicator. Currently suitability assessments are
only well developed for schools.

Undertaking suitability surveys of other operational
property will be a significant task

but wi
ll make a valuable contribution to ensuring
buildings support effective delivery of high quality services.
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7


OPTION ASSESSMENT, PROJECT APPRAISAL AND FINANCIAL PLANNING


In order to
develop

the optimum property solution
the
council
undertak
es option
assessment

and

project

appraisals
. Requirements are then fed into the development
of
the
council’s
capital strategy and
following a process of prioritisation included in
the development of the annual capital programme.



7.1

Option Assessment


Option

assessment is undertaken at both the strategic and project specific levels.


At the strategic level various options for dealing with the
council’s
property
requirements have been considered as follows:




Continue current ownership;



Leasehold occupation
;



PP
P/PFI
;



Transfer to Trust
s
; and



Arms Length Management Organisations taking some responsibilities for
property
.


No single option provides the solution to meet all the
council’s
property requirements
and different options are selected dependant on circumsta
nces.
Generally
the
approach is to own buildings for which there is a long term need and to lease to
meet sh
ort to medium term requirements which cannot be met from within the
existing

property portfolio.


Examples of the adoption of new solutions are the
use of PFI for the replacement of
schools, a Local education Partnership (LEP) for the replacement and refurbishment
of high schools under the BSF programme, a PPP to deliver
Gateway

centres and

the

transfer to trusts for elderly person’s homes
. The manage
ment of
leisure centres

and community centres has also been transferred to a trust
. The
council
has also
over recent years
increased its use of leasehold occupation of office space, as an
appropriate solution to meet sho
rt and medium term office needs, th
ough this is
likely to decrease in the future.


At the project specific level different options are considered in order that the most
effective option can be brought forward, for project appraisal and prioritisation.


7.2

Project Appraisal and Prioritisation


High
-
level option appraisal is undertaken for major regeneration, service and
infrastructure proposals to establish the strategic direction for medium to long
-
term
capital investment, with options being presented to Cabinet members for decision
.


Having es
tablished preferred investment options the
council
then prioritises its
capital inves
tment according to whether it:




Meets the Government's annual capital guideline for each major service;



Maximises available external funding;



Meets national, regional and

local priorities;



Targets its key priority regeneration areas, i.e. Seedley/Langworthy, Higher and
Lower Broughton, Ordsall and Kersal/Charlestown, Chapel Street and renewal
areas; and

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24



p
rovides continuing support to the revenue budget.


Within the criter
ia for local priorities, the
council
objectively assesses its priorities for
capital investment by embracing a wide range of criteria, including the extent to
which they satisfy health and safety requirements, contribute towards enhancing the
life of an as
set, improve the environment, stimulate the local economy, reduce risk,
engage partners and consult with the public.


Weightings are applied to the assessment criteria in terms of high, medium and low
priorities, these consist of the following:




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7.3

Financial Planning


A 5
-
year Capital Strategy sets out the
council’s
spending plans and priorities, and
forecasts how they

will be funded, taking into account expected borrowing approvals
and grant availability from the Government, forecasts of capital receipts and any
other internally
-
generated funds. Capital investment planning is linked to service
planning by ensuring thro
ugh the priority assessment process that it supports the
delivery of the outcomes required from the Community Plan, Cabinet priorities,
directorate service plans, the Best Value Performance Plan and the Asset
Management Plan, whilst also ensuring that thes
e plans are explicit in outlining
major capital and revenue resource implications.


The annual capital programme is refined in the light of actual funding
announcements from the Government, the updating of capital receipt forecasts and
any emerging spendin
g priorities, e.g. as a result of new Government initiatives,
which may not have been identified during the capital investment planning process.


A spending profile is identified for each approved capital scheme and officers
monitor actual cash flow again
st the profile at monthly intervals during the year.
Likewise, key milestones are identified for each major capital receipt above
£100,000 and monitored by the
City Treasurer
. Monthly reports are made to
members of Budget Scrutiny Committee and Cabinet on
the financial and physical
progress with the capital programme and its funding. More detail of this process is
outlined in the Capital Strategy document



The introduction of the Prudential Code for Capital Finance in Local Authorities has
removed previous

controls over financing capital expenditure and replaced them
with a self
-
governing framework whereby

authorities are free to pursue capital
investment plans, so long as they are affordable, prudent and sustainable. The
freedom to use “Prudential” borrow
ing,
i.e.

borrowing unsupported by government
grants, has assisted the
council
with its asset management proposals. It is allowing
better capital planning by smoothing of timing imbalances caused in the past with
borrowing and grant approvals and completi
on of disposals for capital receipts. It
has facilitated the consideration of invest to save type proposals, which might have
failed in the past due to the lack of available funding.

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Developments in tax law and accounting for leases increasingly reduce
the
likelihood that leasing companies can offer attractive contracts. When equipment
leases, for example for vehicles and wheeled bins, come up for renewal, a thorough
options appraisal is now conducted to determine the best means to finance the
investmen
t. Similarly, bids for new investment that might previously have been
financed by lease, especially in IT equipment, undergo the same appraisal. In many
cases, prudential borrowing has proven to be the most attractive and efficient means
of obtaining fin
ance
.


It had been recognised that the state

of the highway network in
Salford was poor
and there was a chronic shortage of funds to address the situation. This, along with
the current claims culture, resulted in steadily increasing numbers of tripping cl
aims
being aimed at the
council
and monies being used to pay out insurance claims
rather than improving the footpaths and highways.


Urban Vision Partnership Ltd, the
council’s
joint venture with the private sector, is in
the
fourth

year of a massive inves
tment of £22m over 5 years to improve the
condition of highways and footpaths. This investment is to be funded from
prudential borrowing and the capital financing costs
funded
by the reduction in the
num
ber and cost of insurance claim

payouts. Significant

improvements in claim
payouts
have been achieved with a reduction of 25% over the four year period.




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8



KEY
ISSUES

AND FUTURE PROPERTY REQUIREMENTS




Key

issues for the
council
, which impact upon the property portfolio, are set out



below.




8.1.

Corpor
ate Key Issues




Think Efficiency


The council is undertaking a three

year “Think Efficiency” programme which
commenced in autumn 2008.

The programme is one of the most significant undertaken by Salford, with the aim of;
service improvements for citizens,

balancing the books and changing the
organisation for the future.

The programme is changing the way the council undertakes and delivers its
Administration,
Common
functions and Customer services. It is also de
-
layering its
management structures and changi
ng its workforce management arrangements

This activity will lead to significant changes in the office portfolio, customer service
access points and training accommodation.

To support the changes required a new 3
-
5 year office accommodation strategy is
bein
g established.




Agile Working


An integral part of delivering the changes and benefits of the ‘Think Efficiency’
programme,

the council is embarking on a programme of activity to enable staff to
work in different ways, in a variety of locations and in a
more collaborative way
across directorates through the introduction of new working practices referred to as
“Agile Working”.

This will be supported by changes in technology, organisation,
office environments and property to facilitate changed behaviour an
d create
performance improvement.




Office accommodation Strategy


To support “Think Efficiency” and coupled with Agile Working the council is setting
out and implementing a new 3
-
5 year Office Accommodation Strategy to deliver the
property changes requir
ed.


This strategy sets new space occupancy targets
,

which will drive a reduction in the
portfolio, identifies buildings for potential closure through portfolio rationalisation and
confirms the design principles set out below:




Open plan office space


Fle
xible in use and supporting modern working
practices and a project delivery team approach
;



Fully IT enabled


VOIP
;



Providing improved staff facilities


Welfare areas, accessible toilets, showers,
prayer rooms
;



With improved reception and interview/meetin
g rooms
;



Using modern furniture


to support efficient space utilisation
; and



With office layouts
providing
shared desks, ‘drop down’ and ‘breakout areas’
.


This strategy to provide modern flexible work space will support the delivery of
“Think Efficiency”

and “Flexible Working” and the underlying organisation
al

and
cultural changes which these programmes will require.

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Sustainability
and
Climate Change


Government is placing an increasing emphasis on the need for local authorities to
demonstrate their so
und management of environmental sustainability issues.
In this
respect it will be important to ensure that our approach to procurement of goods,
services and contracts is in accordance with high environmental standards. The
Sustainable Construction SPD pro
vides a good framework for the assessment of
new development proposals.


The new Performance Fram
ework
require us to report on the greenhouse gas
emissions arising from the
council
as a business unit. Figures suggest that the
energy use from buildings a
ccounts for around 70% of those emissions.
Significant
reductions in energy consumption can lead t
o significant financial savings
.


A key element of
the
council’s
commitment to environmental improvement is

the
development of a Climate Change Strategy
,

whi
ch will identify our priorities for
reducing greenhouse gas emissions and ensuring that the city is resilient to the
impacts of climate change.

The Climate Change Strategy will provide the framework
for Salford’s LAA Climate Change Target and for

progressi
ng towards the longer
-
term nati
onal carbon reduction targets (26% by 2020; 80% by 2050
).


There will be an increasing need to improve our year on year environment
al
performance
,
P
ublic buildings
now

need to display energy performance certificates.
By 201
1, the Government is intending to introduce a carbon trading scheme for all
public bodies which will set limits on emissions alongside tradable credits for good
performance
. W
e will also need to identify climate related risks to business continuity
includi
ng property related risks, e.g. flood risk, and demonstrate the resilience of our
buildings and the services delivered from them.


Carbon Reduction


As part of Salford’s Local Area Agreement, t
here is a requirement to secure

a 12.5%
reduction
in per capi
ta carbon emissions
by 2011. It is imperative that the
council
demonstrates community leadership and its own commitment through its own
energy management.


The
council’s
5 year Car
bon Management Plan (CMP)
has demonstrated the very
significant potential f
or reducing carbon emissions from the
council’s
operational
estate and th
e very significant savings that

will result. The CMP requires significant
investment to improve Heating Controls and Zoning, to install Loft
and Cavity Wall
Insulation and
achieve sig
nificant lighting upgrades. The proposed investment of
£955K would result in an annual saving of £431K, yielding a payback in 2.2 years.


Whilst bearing in mind the need to maintain a good return on investments, there is
now a need to consider more radic
al improvements to the operational estate that
reflect the opportunity to secure renewable sources of heat and power. Ground
sourced heat, Combined Heat and Power, Photovoltaic
s and
replacement of oil and
gas fired boilers with biofuel boilers are all opti
ons to be seriously considered as part
of the developing Carbon
Management
Plan.


Climate Change Adaptation


Another aspect of Climate Change is to ensure that the council’s operational estate
is resilient to the impacts of predicted future weather patter
ns, occurring as a result
of climate change. National Indicator 188 requires the
council
to “achieve an
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appropriate level of preparedness” to manage the risks to council services from
changing climate and weather patterns.



During 2009, it will be import
ant to assess the risks to council buildings and the
services provided from those buildings from the

increasing risks of flooding,
serious
heat events and stormy weather. This will require a