Migration Unit Plan Grade: 8 Sherri Mohan ... - SectionL - home

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Grade 8 Migration:
Should I

Stay Or
Should I
Go Now?





















Students: Barbara Ann Hession, Sherri Mohan

and

Michael Walsh


Professor: Barbara Brockman


Course: PED 2141 Section L


Date: Tuesday March 22, 2011


Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


2

Overview of the Unit



Canada is a multicultural society where
we
appreciate the diversity of one
another. Over the last 25 years, Canada’s population has both grown and increased
in its diversity. In fact, during this period, three million people have left their native
homes and relocated to Canada. Moreover, Canada
continues to be a country that
many people from around the world wish to come to for a variety of reasons;
therefore we can expect the population of Canada to increase in terms of growth and
diversity. To that end, the ‘big idea’ for students to understan
d is the many factors
that influence migration along with the “challenges and opportunities that migration
presents to individuals and communities in Canada” (MOE, 2004, p. 76).


The unit will address the following three overall curriculum expectatio
ns:



Identify

factors that affect migration and mobility, describe patterns and
trends of migration in Canada, and identify the effects of migration on
Canadian society;



Use

a variety of geographic representations, resources, tools, and
technologies to gat
her, process, and communicate geographic information
about migration and its effects on people and communities;



Connect

the real experiences of Canadians to information about the causes
and effects of migration



This unit will
teach

migration by helpi
ng students understand migration through
the investigation of key periods of immigration and emigration in Canada’s history.
Taking a timeline approach allows students to connect the causes and effects for
migration with the realities of the period. More
over, the unit will draw on a variety
of teaching strategies to accommodate the multiple intelligences and learning needs
Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


3

of the students. Strategies include: direct instruction, whole group discussion, small
group work, viewing film/video,
and activity

s
tations, working in pairs and
independently.


The unit is integrated with the Language curriculum, as it will require students to
read, write and communicate orally. In addition, the topic of migration can be
integrated with the Mathematics strand on
data management. There is also an
opportunity to integrate this unit with the Science and Technology curriculum
in
regard to the impact of migration on water systems and vice versa.


Students will be given the essential question


why do people move?

While their
answers will be varied and diverse, students will understand that moving comes
with both opportunities and challenges and ultimately has an effect on Canadian
society.


Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


4

Migration Unit
Plan

Grade
:
8







Sherri Mohan, Michael Walsh, and
Barbara Ann Hession


CONCEPTS AND SKILLS

Through this unit students will learn the following concepts and will develop and use the following academic skills and learn
ing skills



Concepts




Push
factors that influence people
to move away (drought, war,
persecution)



Pull factors that draw people to
want to move to a certain country
(opportunity)



Barriers to migration (including the
legal processes involved, physical
barriers)



Challenges and opportu
nities
presented to individual immigrants,
communities and Canada



Migration trends within Canada


Academic Skills




Research skills to gather
information



Organize/categorize ideas and
information



Use of graphic organizers



Providing supporting evidence for
s
tatements



Use of clear, relevant, and concise
written language



Use of vocabulary specific to the
unit



Interpretation of maps and graphs

Learning Skills




Time Management skills



Effective participation in group and
team learning



Independent work



Organizatio
n of self and materials



Co
-
regulation



Goal attainment



Collaboration



Interpretation



Self
-
Regulation




TEACHING STRATEGIES



TEACHING STRATEGY

TYPE OF STRATEGY

DESCRIPTION

Lecture

Direct Instruction

Students will be taught the appropriate definitions and
terminology of the migration unit


Research Process


Inquiry/Analysis

Students will engage in research to write a short narrative
response about the benefits of immigration to Canadian
society

Oral Presentation

Activity Based

Class discussion and present
ations on migration

Activity/Learning
Centres

Activity Based

Creating migrations maps and immigration
posters/videos


Reading and Comprehending Text


Thinking Skills

Students will document their interpretations of
migrations using information from print
and visual media

Homework & Independent Reading

Independent Learning

Homework assignments/independent
research
/interviewing

Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


5



Overall Expectation &
Specific Expectations


Tools & Materials, Safety

& Teacher Resources


Step
-
by
-
step instructions

(
A
General overview of the Unit plan
)


Assessment Tool(s) &
Accommodations


Twelve

Opening activity for
Migration Unit Plan




Overall
Expectation

Specific
Expectation


-
Identify barriers to migration


-
Locate relevant information
from a variety

of primary
and
secondary sources


-
Use appropriate vocabulary to
describe their inquiries and
observations.


The following website:


http://onfnfb.gc.ca/e
ng/collection/film/?i
d=55221


Take home
workshe
et for
assessment purposes

Learning Objectives/Outcomes:

Students will:



Watch a firsthand account of migration and observe a filmmaker’s
perspective (second
-
hand) of migration through a specific lens.



Create a response to a film about migration



Facilitate
a discussion about their response to the film


INSTRUCTIONS:

Opening:

Begin the film Twelve. This film could take an entire period of class
-
time, as it runs
for 43 minutes. Stay tuned into the students to ensure that they are engaged and
that the material
is appropriate for their group.


If there is time at the end of the film, facilitate a discussion based on observations or
questions students have from the film. Explain the worksheet assignment to the
students to


Create a worksheet that asks the followi
ng questions
:

After seeing the film Twelve,
and participating in our student response, do you know what it
means to relocate? Move? Migrate? Immigrate?

Do these words all mean the same thing? People
move for many reasons, some of which Lester Alfonso desc
ribed in his film. Using the following
questions, conduct an interview with someone you know who has moved at some point in their
life. Ask the following:



How long ago did you move?



What was the primary reason for your relocation?



Was it to a new country? Province? City?
Neighbourhood
?



Was there “red
-
tape” involved in your move, was it difficult for reasons
that go beyond logistics of moving? Government forms or racism?

Closing:

The above (suggested) worksheet is a take home
assignment to be returned the
next day for assessment purposes. On return, students will break into groups of 4
-
5
to discuss and share (or pass if they do not want to share) their findings.
Assessment will take place regarding their oral skills in this are
a, as well as written
expression on the worksheet (cross
-
curricular to Language Arts).


A
S
SESSMENT

Assess for learning by using the
oral discussion and written
worksheet.


Scaffold
unit

vocabulary and
pertinent information based
on this assessment for
lea
rning.


ACCOMODATIONS

Visually impaired
:

students would be seated
near the front of the class
with a clear view of the
teacher’s
resources
and use
their preferred tools.


Exceptional

Students are given preferred
tools, and the assignment
may be reduced in time and
length depending on the
student’s educational plan.


Any other exceptionalities
can be accommodated in this
entire unit by following
suggestions from the Ontario
Ministry of

Education
Document
Education For All


Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


6

EARLY
MIGRATION
HISTORY
TIMELINE


OVERALL
:


Identify factors that affect
migration and mobility, describe
patterns and trends of migration

in Canada, and identify the
effects of migration on Canadian
society;

• Use
a variety of geographic
representations, resources,
tools, and technologies to
gather,

process, and
communicate geographic
information about migration and
its effects on

people and
communities;

• Connect the real experiences
of Canadians to information
abo
ut the causes and effects of

migration.

SPECIFIC
:

-
Describe the effects that
migration has had on the
development of Canada

-
Formulate questions to
guide and analyze research
on migration and mobility

-
Use thematic maps to
identify patterns in

migration

-
Communicate

the results of
inquiries for
specific
purposes and audiences,
using

compute
r slide shows,
videos, websites,
oral
presentations, written notes
and

reports, illustrations,
tables, charts, maps,



History Texts



Web access



Class Blog



Printer



Paper



P
encils/Pens



Art Markers



Glue sticks



Tape



Art Magazines



Art Postcards



Digital Camera


Instructional Strategies:


Interactive instruction:
Students discuss their
opinions in smaller
groups.


Experiential
instruction: Students
express their
immediate reactions to
influences and
happenings (within
their period) in their
notebooks
.



This lesson follows a transition activity from the previous lesson TWELVE.


HOOK: Teacher will have students line

up against an open wall in class,
(the wall for the class activity) and ask the students to organize
themselves by hair color, then height, then age. Explain that we are all
from the same time, but guided

to be here in Canada by many different
influences
.


Beginning this lesson after the small group discussion and hand
-
in of
Twelve Student Response Interview.


-
Draw a large line on
the board

(or

on paper) and choose periods of time
from Pre
-
history to Colonial times
for the students to discover. Assign
periods to students as
small
groups, encouraging them to
research their
time period and how/what cultures were entering into Canada during
that time. Use any available resources: library, internet, books, articles in
m
agazines, paintings, music, interviews, etc.

-
Students are given a 50
-
m
inute class period to research,
create and
present their work/u
nderstanding. Research is to be
completed from
above mentioned resources
.
--
Students may choose to take digital
pictures
of examples from learning anchors, cut and paste reproductions
onto paper, print off examples of the
period or culture
’s influences, or
draw a portrait of
a migrant person from that time
. All combined
information will be represented on the timeline, so en
courage students
to stay within a 3
-
5” square to allow for everyone to attach their
examples on the timeline.


-
Closing

of this lesson includes lesson closure questions: “
Was there a
common
“reason to move”

found by your group? Can you describe that
influe
nce?”

and

What was happening
in Canada or

the World at that
point in history
? Does
anything else explain their movement
?

Use these
questions as a basis for the assessment task assigned in student
noteboo
ks

(reflection)
.




A
S
SESSMENT and
EVALUATION




Students will get 3 marks
(compl
ete or incomplete) in
their note
book for their
reflection of their
selected
time period/culture



The time line squares will be
marked based on completion
of required elements on
rubric

created by teacher
.




Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


7


Mapping
Movement of
Prehistory
Civilizations


Overall Expectation

Specific Expectation


-
Identify barriers to
migration


-
L
ocate relevant
information from a variety

of primary and secondary
sources


-
Describe how technology
has improved human
mobility;


-
Use appropriate
vocabulary to describe
their inquiries and
observations.

-

Resource Books about
Prehistoric Cultures

from library


The following websites


http://www.ucalgary.ca/appli
ed_history/tutor/firstnations/t
heories.html


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Indigenous_peoples_of_the_A
mericas


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Settlement_of_the_Americas


http://maps.
nationalgeographi
c.com/map
-
machine#s=h&c=28.7291304
83430144,%20107.303466796
875&z=4


Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wi
ki/History_of_immigration
_to_Canada


Learning Objectives/Outcomes:

Students will:



Use a world map to think about their own potential m
igration and the reasons
behind that decision;



Answer and discuss questions about human mobility using figures and graphs;



Explain migration in terms of push and pull factors;



Relate migration patterns to economic, political, social, and environmental
f
actors; and



Create a map of a past human migration in Canada (North America or World).

INSTRUCTIONS:

Opening:

Ask students to look at a world map and think about two places they would like to
move to after graduation from high school or college. Have them create a list of
reasons why they think they would like to move there. Then discuss why they chose
these locat
ions. What would be the downside of moving?


Ask students how they define migration, and keep track of their answers on a large
piece of paper or poster board.

Development:

Have students look at a
map of world population density
.

What are their impressions of how the world's population is spread out?


Why do people move? Ask students to think about the force
s that drive human migration.
Have students look at this overview of the

human migration

and explore the "push" and
"pull" factors
involved. What are some examples of things that push or pull people away
from their homeland? Ask students to think about real world examples of some of these
situations. The examples should cover
pre
-
history, as later histories will be covered in
latter p
arts of this unit.

Use Stats Canada or other related websites to research the topic of migration and find
articles about
PREHISTORIC MIGRATIONS

for the students to use to answer the
questions below.

Ask students to form small groups and discuss the followi
ng questions:



What are the different types of
prehistoric
human movements described in
the articles?



What is the most common type of human movement?



Which
ancient man

groups move the
farthest
? Why do students think this is
the case?



What types of peopl
e

by race,
area of habitation, or era

show the
highest rate of migration? Why do students think this is the case?




Why do students think the
North America

has a distinct pattern of




ACTIVATING PRIOR
KNOWLEDGE
:


Use a
Vocabulary
Development Chart

with
all relevant terms at the
beginning of this lesson.


Additionally
, use the
following guided questions to
inspire discussion:


“Why would anyone leave their
family, friends, job, home,
everything and move to another
country”.


Discuss with the class and write
down their responses on flip
chart.


These two activities
create
scaffolding opportunities as
well as powerful extension
activities for the lessons.


Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


8

movements

during Prehistory
?

Closing:

Have students return to their discussion about where they think they would like to
move someday. Have they changed their minds since the beginning of this lesson?
How would they feel if they were
forced

to move somewhere, even if it were
somewhere they tho
ught they might want to live? How have their ideas of migration
changed since they first defined it in the opening?


PIER 21:

AN EAST
COAST STORY


SPECIFIC
:


-

Identify

the push and
pull factors that influence
people to move

-

Identify

barriers to
migration

-

Locate

relevant
information from a variety
of primary and secondary
sources

-

Use

appropriate
vocabulary to describe
their inquiries and
observations

-

Use

thematic maps to
identify patterns in
migration


-


-

Books


Pier 21

-

Newspaper articles

-

Magazine articles

-

On
-
line sources

-

Primary/secondary
sources

-

Maps

-



Students will:

-

Understand

the reasons for immigration to Canada between 1928
and 1956

-

Investigate

migration patterns to and from Canada

-

Learn

about various
migrant groups during this period


Open:

Direct Instruction

Ask students what they know about Pier 21

and provide additional
information


Lesson: Jig Saw Activity


1.

Divide class into
expert
groups


Topics:

-

Home Children

-

Depression

-

WW2 Service Personnel

-

WW2 Guest Children

-

WW2 War Bri
des

-

Post
-
war Refugees/Displaced Persons


2. Bring an expert from each group together into new groups to share their
knowledge of each topic with others in their group.


Closing:

whole class discussion



Pin

countries on map and mark waves in different colour markers
adding timeline




Teacher will listen
-
in
on
group sharing




Provide students with
exit card or quick
-
write to assess
learning


East Coast v.
West Coast

Immigration

-


-

Books

-

On
-
line sources

-

Primary/secondary
sources


Open: whole class

Ask students what they know about west coast immigration


Lesson:
Activity
Centres



Divide class into co
-
operative learning groups




Student writing will
be assessed for
learning

Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


9


-

Identify

the push and
pull factors that influence
people to move

-

Identify

barriers to
migration

-

Locate

relevant
information from a variety
of primary and secondary
sources

-

Use

appropriate
vocabulary to describe
their inquiries and
observations

-

Use

thematic

maps to
identify patterns in
migration

-

Maps

-


-



G
roup
s

will visit activity centre
s

where they will learn about west coast
immigration and push/pull factors

for migration


Return as whole class

-
>
Pin

countries on map and mark waves in different colour markers
adding timeline (ensure colour matches timeli
ne of east coast
immigration)


Compare/contrast to East Coast

-

Model

using

key visual

Closing: Students write paragraph to compare
and

contrast one group that
immigrated via east coast
and another

via west coast



RESETTLEMENT

IN
THE NORTH


-

Identify

the push and
pull factors that influence
people to move

-

Identify

barriers to
migration

-

Locate

relevant
information from a variety
of primary and secondary
sources

-

Use

appropriate
vocabulary to describe
their inquiries and
observations

-

Use

themat
ic maps to
identify patterns
im
migration


Computers

Student worksheets

CBC radio clip

Maps


Open
: ask students who has ever moved? Did they want to move? How did
they feel?


Lesson
:

Resettlement of First Nations people in Canada’s North


Think
-
Pair
-
Share

-

Students

will be given the website for The
Qikiqtani Truth
Commission and a specific community to investigate

-

Students

complete a worksheet (includes locating the community
on a map)

-

Students

discuss their findings with a partner

-

Whole

class discussion on what they have learned

Closing: make a global connection


-

Display

map of Indian Ocean islands and play CBC radio cl
ip about
Chagossians on Diego Garcia (1970) being evicted by UK so US build a naval
base





Provide students with
exit card or quick
-
write to assess
learning

Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


10


POPULATION
STATISTICS


-

Locate

relevant
information from a variety
of primary and secondary
sources

-

Describe

the effects that
migration has had on the
development of Canada

-

Formulate

questions to
guide and analyze
research on migration
and mobility


-


-

Computer Lab

-

E
-
Stat

access

-

Student Worksheets


Cross
-
curricular lesson

-

This

lesson will be conducted during the math period


Open:
whole class discussion


-

How

data management skills
help geographers

in their research


Lesson
:

* adapt lesson plan from Statistics Canada

-

Pair
students to work together

-

Students follow E
-
Stat instructions and Worksheet 1A and 1B
(determining population growth for Canada and one province over
a 25 year period)

-

Once they have completed gathering data, students answer
questions on Worksheet 2


Closing: whole class

-

Prompt

students on what questions they found interesting or did
not like/understand to engage critical thinking





Student worksheets
will be collected and
assessed for learning

Changing Times:
1950’s
-
1970’s &
1970’s to 1980’s


Curriculum
Expectations:


-
Identify

the push and pull
factors that influence
people to move;

-
Locate

relevant
information from a
variety of primary and
secondary sources;

-
Use

appropriate
vocabulary to describe
their inquiries and
observations


-

Print out
of flags
and maps of each
country to put at
each station

-

Handout of chart
that students will
fill in

-

Signs indicating
the year to put at
each station

-

4
-
5 identical
handouts to place
at each station
(from “The Kids
Book of Canadian
Immigration)


Students wi
ll:

-

Briefly review the migration patterns we’ve seen thus far in class by
pointing to the timeline on the board

-

Explain to the class that it is now 1950’s and for the next twenty
years, Canada’s immigration policy has changed.

-

The policy on immigration has

changed in Canada and it is up to
them to discover why it has changed.

-

Also the situations of many other countries have changed and it is
up to them to discover what those changes are.


Around the World in an Hour

Open:

-

Explain to class that our classr
oom represents the world, and we will all
have the opportunity to visit certain parts of the world and discover what
was happening in those countries in the 1950’s
-
80’s.

-

Divide the class is divided into equal groups.

-

The teacher sets up stations in the

classroom, with flags, maps and
information handouts for the following countries:



Canada


Caribbean


Hungary

Assessment:

Student
worksheets will be
collected and assessed
for learning



Accommodations:


-
Provide visual
clues at each station
to appeal to the
visual learner


-
Group students
based on reading
capabilities to have
balanced guided
Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


11



Czech


United States


Uganda


Chile

-

Each student will have a chart to fill in the name of the country, the
year, the significant event or reasons which altered their lives,
population that left and population that located to Canada.


-

Students will travel in groups to fill out chart. This wi
ll allow
students to read the handouts together and ensure that each person
in the group thoroughly comprehends the handout provided.

Close:

-

As a class, the teacher will ask the students to first comment on the
process of “Around the World in an Hour”. Wh
at did they like? What
didn’t they like? Why do they think I chose this process? What are
some of the benefits of this process?

-

The class will then review their findings on their chart and look for
similarities and differences between the countries.


reading groups.


-
Assist certain
groups as needed.



1970’s
-
1980’s
Canada opens its
doors


Specific
Expectations:



Describe

the
effects that
migration has had
on the development
of Canada



Tools:

-

Guest speaker:
an adult (from
a location like
Gerard street,
little Italy,

China town)

-

Construction
paper

-

Journals

-



Open:

-

Discuss the concept of “heritage” and what it means in Canada
today.

-

Students will think of how different heritages are represented in
their city.

-

Discuss how the new immigration act in 1976 helped open the
doors for immigrants in Canada, especially refugees from Africa,
South America, and the Middle East.

Lesson: Guest speaker (from one of the locations listed above)

Heritage in Canada

discussion will incorporate festivals, locations of
settlement in cities

-

Guest speaker will discuss personal trials and tribulations of
personal voyage to Canada, where and how they settled and how
they continue heritage in Canada.

-

In journals, students will reflect on the experiences of guest speaker
and make a personal conne
ction to the discussion.


Close:

-

Students will write an appreciative and empathetic thank you card
to the guest speaker.





Assessment:



Students will get 3
marks (complete
or incomplete) in
their notebook for
their reflection


Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


12


Modern Times &
Coming
to
Canada Today

-
Explain how the
components of culture can
be affected by migration;

-
Describe the effects that
migration has had on the
development of Canada

-
Locate

relevant
information
from a variety of primary
and secondary sources (e.g.,
primary
sources: surveys,
statistics, interviews, field
studies; secondary sources:
maps, illus
-

trations, print
materials, v
ideos, CD
-
ROMs, Internet sites)



Tools:

-

Movie:
From
Far Away

-

Book:
Immigrant
children speak
(Each pair of
students will
receive one
story

from the
“leaving” ,
“differences” ,
“Adjusting” ,
“Problems”
and “Feelings”
sections)

-

Chart handout

-

Letter
template

-



Open:

-

Discuss with students how so far we’ve talked about the different groups
that have relocated to Canada in hopes for a better life. People are
continuously coming to Canada as the days go by. However, just because it is
easier to come to Canada as there a
re
fewer

barriers than before (arguably),
when immigrants come to Canada their troubles don’t end.

*
Discuss

the process of becoming a Canadian Citizen today


-

Show the six
-
minute movie:
From Far Away


-

Discussion questions:

1)
Why does Saoussan have no
mouth drawn on her face for the majority of
the film?

2) What category of migration did her family and her fall under? (What are
refugees?)

3) Why was she afraid of the Halloween?


4) Can you think of any connections related to their own life or others?

Lesson:
Immigrant Children’s Voice

Like Saoussan, many children face discomfort and hurt when they move
from one country to the next. Today we are going to read some of the voices
of these children. You may recognize some of them as you may be in the
same
situation or know someone who is. You may be someone who teases
and makes fun of those who are different. In pairs, we are going to read
certain stories of some kids who had to move from one country to the next.
You will have to fill out the chart indicati
ng the name of the child, the
country where he or she originated from, why their family moved, and how
is the move affecting their life now.

-

Have some volunteers share some stories they’ve come across.

-

Using the letter template provided, students are requi
red to write a
1
-
page letter to the federal government: inviting the prime minister
to a day in action where students will explore inclusion and discuss
how to raise awareness of immigrant prejudice. In the letter of









Assessment and
Evaluation:


Formative
Asse
ssment:
Student writing will
be assessed for
learning


Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


13

invitation, be sure to include one of t
he personal stories you’ve
read.


Culminating
Activity


R.S.V.P.

Are You
Coming to
Canada?



-

Books

(variety)

-

Newspaper and
Magazine articles

-

Government
documents

-

Computers

-

Maps

-

Video camera

-

Digital camera

-

Tape recorder

-

Art supplies


* Students may bring
additional materials

-



Rationale:


Students have learned about the many reasons why people move and the
challenges they can face after
relocating. This task will be an assessment of
learning and evaluate student understanding, the connections students have
made and skills they have developed.


Performance Task:


1.

Pairs will pick a period in time when a specific migrant group
immigrated t
o Canada (students will be given a choice from a
number of time periods);

2.

One

person in the pair will advocate reasons why their migrant
group should relocate to Canada;

3.

One

person in the pair will advise on the challenges their migrant
group will face in immigrating

Pairs will present the pros and cons and may use one of the following
forums to create their 10
-
minute presentation:



Commercial

(video)



Debate



Poster



Role

play



B
rochure



Letters



Power

point

Note: students may also meet with the teacher to discuss alternatives to the
items listed above.


Time:


The culminating task will take four to five class periods (depending on class
size) and may require some work by students o
utside of school.


Evaluation of
learning

conducted
during this
culminating task as
a final
mark for the
unit.


The final evaluation
will be based on a
rubric given to the
students at onset of
the assignment.
Time will be spent
in class covering the
content of the
rubric and attention
will be given to
details contained
within.


Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


14

The first class period will be an opportunity for students to plan and do
research on their migrant group and the time period. Students will need
access to the variety of resources used in the unit and to a computer.


In the
second
-
cl
ass

period, students will complete their research and work
on their presentations.


Within the third class period, students will complete their presentations and
practice their presentation with another pair. Pairs will be given an
opportunity to revise t
heir presentations based on feedback from their
peers.


The final class period(s) will be for students to make their presentations in
front of the entire class.


Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


15


Detailed Lesson
Plan


Title:


Twelve

Subject/Course:


Social Studies

Time:
50 minutes

Strand:

Geography


Grade
:

8



Lesson Description

This is
an

opening activity for
a unit plan on
Migration
.
The film
Twelve

provides an excellent
introduction to the topic of migration, as the director’s intent is to demonstrate the impact of migration
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楣栠瑨敳i⁷潲d猠慲攠畳sd.


Stage 1: Desired Results

Fundamental Concepts/Skills

Systems and Structures
:

t
he ways humans and nature are

organized.

Understanding h
umans have
created systems and structures to

allow societies to function
.


Interactions
and Interdependence
: t
he nuances shaping

relationships with
in and among human and
natural
systems and structures. Human and natural processes and components conn
ect with, adapt to,
and have an

impact on one another.


Change and Continuity
: t
he fundamental
criteria for

assessing the development of human and natural
systems

and structures. Change is manifested by differences over

time, and is recognized by comparing
phenomena and

contexts, as they exist at different times. Continuity represents consistency an
d
connectedness over time, and is recognized by exploring the forces within nature and

human societies
that create stability and link the past with the present.


Culture
: e
xpression
s of humanity learned and shared
within a specified population, influenced by

瑨攠
p桹獩捡s

敮v楲i湭敮琮 C畬瑵r攠er潶id敳⁡⁣潮捥 瑵慬⁦t慭敷ark 景r⁩ 瑥rpr整楮g⁴桥⁷ r汤,⁡ d
influences the perception

of time, place, identity, significance, and change.


Power and Governance
: the means and supporting
structures whereby laws and rules

are enforced in a

society and in the global community.


Big Ideas/Essential Question

Big Idea:
understand the many factors that influence migration along with the challenges and
opportunities that migration presents to individuals and communities in
Canada
.


Essential Question: Why do people move?


Ontario Curricular Overall Expectation

Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


16

-

Identify

factors that affect migration and mobility, describe patterns and trends of migration

in
Canada, and identify the effects of migration on Canadian society;


-

Connect the real experiences of Canadians to information about the causes and effects of

migration


Ontario Curricular Specific Expectation

-

identify barriers to migration (e.g., physical, financial, legal, political, emotional);


-

locate relevant
information from a variety of primary and secondary sources (e.g., primary
sources: surveys, statistics, interviews, field studies; secondary sources: maps, illustrations, print
materials, videos, CD
-
ROMs, Internet sites);


-

use appropriate vocabulary (e.g.
, accessible, barriers, migration, mobility, immigration,
emigration, refugees, modes of transportation, push factors, pull factors ) to describe their
inquiries and observations.


Lesson Goals

Students will:



Identify factors that lead to migration



Begin using appropriate vocabulary



Make connections to real experiences of Canadians about the causes and effects of migration


Stage 2: Planning learning experience and instruction

Student Groupings

Instructional Strategies



Whole class



Independent
work



Small group



Indirect instruction (i.e. watch film)



Impendent Study (i.e. worksheet)



Interactive instruction (i.e.
discussion)

Materials

Considerations



Projector (computer/film)



Worksheet Handouts



Ensure all students are seated to watch
the film



Sufficient number of handouts for the class



Accommodations



Visually impaired
:

students would be seated near the front of the class with a clear view of the
teacher’s resources and use their preferred tools



Exceptional

s
tudents are given preferred
tools, and the assignment may be reduced in time and
length depending on the student’s educational pla
n (e.g. answer fewer questions)


Stage 3: Learning experience and instruction

Motivational Hook (_
2
_ MINS.)
:


Chime
-
In Activity (see appendix)


Open

(_
1
_MINS)
:

Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


17

Preface the film for students


using the synopsis provided on the National Film Board website




Body (_
44
_ MINS)
:

Show the film
Twelve (approximately 43 minutes)


Close (_
4
_ MINS):

-

Handout students worksheets

-

Read instructions aloud

-

Tell students they will share their worksheets with one another during the next lesson


Link to Future Lessons

-

Next lesson discussion on what students learned from their interviews

-

Transition to understanding the concept of migration, causes and effects

-

Sets the stage for the culminating task where students think about the pros and cons of migration
from the perspective of a migrant group at a point in time


Assessment

-

Assess for learning by using the oral di
scussion and written worksheet

-

Scaffold unit

vocabulary and pertinent information based
on this assessment for learning











Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


18

Activity
:
Chime
-
in


I’d like to begin with the results of a poll that gives a sense of the
enormity of the task facing my Ministry, which operates the
largest
immigration program in the world, in relative terms. The
poll, which was commissioned by the Historica Dominion
Institute and the Munk Centre for Global Affairs at that small
university called the University of Toronto, surveyed people
around the world wit
h the following question: “If I had a choice
to live in Canada or stay in my current country, I would move to
Canada.” The poll found that more than half of the adults of the
world’s 24 leading economies agreed with that statement,
expressing their desire
to immigrate to Canada. Breaking down
the results by country, more than 77 percent of people in China,
71 percent in Mexico, 68 percent of India, 58 percent of Saudi
Arabia, and 53 percent of Russia would come to Canada if given
the choice. All told, that’
s well over two billion people. That’s a
huge number. It’s a good problem to have.


--

Excerpt from
Minister Kenney’s Speech “Dialogue with the Courts: Judicial Actions
and Integrity of Canada’s Immigration and Refugee System”

Given at University of
Western Ontario Law School February 11, 2011; London, ON







Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


19

TWELVE

Student Response Interview


After seeing the film Twelve, and participating in our student response, do you know
what it means to relocate? Move? Migrate? Immigrate?
Emigrate?
Do these
words all
mean the same thing?


People move for many reasons, some of which Lester Alfonso described in his film. Using the following questions,
conduct an interview with someone you know who has moved at some point in their life. Ask the following:

1.

How
long ago did you move?

2.

What was the primary reason for your relocation?

3.

Was it to a new country? Province? City?
Neighbourhood
?

4.

Was there “red
-
tape” involved in your move, was it difficult for reasons that go
beyond logistics of moving? Government forms or

racism?


















Please use the back of this sheet to continue your interview response


After

conducting your interview, please record a few sentences describing your own

experiences moving
. If you have never moved, please describe how the
interview
responses affected your understanding of m
oving in the space below:

Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


20

Students can use this Venn diagram when researching for their culminating task (see
attached). Students can outline their main ideas in this graphic organizer to facilitate the
planning of their production.


PROS


NEUTRAL

CONS

Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


21

Assessment Tool


Evaluation Chart for
Worksheet on Film Review

*








NAME: ________________________________________


YES

Did you complete this
aspect of the
assignment?

NO

. . .

Oops, I

forgot!



CONTENT:

Vocabulary

quiz





CONTEXT
:

Interview with
someone that has
moved





CONNECTION:

Your

experiences
and/or thoughts








*adapted from Barbara Brockman’s
Evaluation Chart for Reflection on Prior Knowledge













Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


22

Graphic
Organizer


Important Statistic or Fact

(What?)

What story does it tell?

(So what?)

Text
-
to
-
world/self
connections

(Now What?)























Rationale:

We plan to use this graphic organizer during the cross
-
curricular math
-
geography lesson based on population statistics. It can also be used for the “around
the world in an hour activity” where students are presented facts about different
countries during
a specific time period. This graphic organizer can be used where
students are presented specific facts or asked to review content, and then to pull out
their own facts. Through reading and discussion, this graph asks students to think
about the importance
of a fact mentioned and how it applies to the overall unit.
Finally, students will make connections to self or the world based on these facts.

Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


23

Annotated List of Suggested Resources


The following suggested resources were selected to create a unit plan on
the theme
of migration, Grade 8 Geography, for use in Ontario school boards.


BOOKS

A Day’s Work
.

Author:


Eve Bunting
Illustrator: Ronald Himl
er

Published by Clarion Books this book is
essential for any cross
-
curricular
lesson on
voice

in student
writing. In this unit on Migration, students will be
asked to write letters from someone else’s perspective.
By reading and
discussing the characters in
A Day’s Work
, students will gain a clear
understanding of how to use voice in their own writing.



Our New Home: Immigrant Children Speak
.

Editors: Emily Hearn, Marywinn Milne

This book published by Second Story Press tells readers what it is like to leave
home and arrive in a place where everything is new.
In
Our New Home
,
children use their writing

and artwork to share these stories with us.



The Kids Book of Black Canadian History
.

Author: Rosemary Sadlier Illustrator: Wang Qijin

The book, published in 2003 by Kids Can Press, presents an overview of nearly
400 years of Black Canadian history. While the book has an historical bent, it
provides readers with a clear view of multiple periods of
migration for Black
people in Canada. T
his resource

provides an
opportunity to expose students
to the incredible depth and breadth of Black history through the lens of
migration.



Ruby's Wish
.




Author:
Shirin Yim Bridges

Illustrator:
Taeeun Yoo

Shirin Yim Bridges presents a complex
social justice issue, gender equity, in a
well illustrated, simply written story that can be used as a springboard for
discussion in both elementary and secondary classrooms. The author has very
subtly embedded in the story a variety of other important iss
ues as well, such
as cultural norms and traditions, family values, fairness, respect and the role of
women in past and present societies. These issues may be addressed and
discussed with varying complexity depending on age level.

This could then
extend int
o a discussion about how gender inequity can be a push factor for
migration.

Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


24





The Kids Book of Canadian Immigration.


Author:
Deborah Hodge Illustrator: John Mantha

This book provides an excellent overview to the topic of immigration in
Canada. Mo
reover, the book reflects the diversity of today’s modern classroom
and places the opportunities and challenges immigrants face into context


whether early
Asian

immigrants, post
-
World War II refugees or modern day
immigrants.



Pier 21: Stories From Ne
ar and Far.


Author:
Anne Renaud

A rich picture book with photos and artist drawings about one of Canada’s
busiest
ports
’s of entry


Pier 21 in Halifax. It is a chronicle of the history of
Pier
21, which

saw one million people enter Canada while it was

in operation
from 1928


1971.



Community Resources

International Organization for Migration

-

www.iom.int


Established in 1951, IOM is the leading inter
-
governmental organization in the
field of migration.
This is a solid source for community information on
migration. Students will be able to see and identify hundreds of Migration
projects
internationally and the reasons for migration across the globe.


Statistics Canada

-

www.statcan.gc.ca

According to their website, Statistics Canada “produces statistics that help
Canadians better understand their country


its population, resources,
economy, society and culture
.” Statistics Canada has a link for Students and
Teach
ers. The
link for teachers provides a veritable bevy of easily digestible
information to use in a classroom. There are ready
-
made teacher kits and
lesson plans available; animated as well as thematic maps; access to E
-
STAT
(an online learning tool design
ed for use by the education community) and a
section called
Statistics: Power from Data!

that assists users in getting the most
from statistics.


Film:
From Far Away

-

http://www.nfb.ca/film/from_far_awa
y

Directed by

Shira Avni

Serene El
-
haj Daoud

Produced by
Michael Fukushima


Production
Agency

National Film Board of Canada


Series: National Film Board
Talespinners

Grade 8 Migration Unit Plan


25

This resource is an excellent way for teachers to begin the grade eight unit on
migration. The site provides a teacher guide, with questions for students to
consider after viewin
g th
is

short
6
-
minute
film. Moreover, it outlines the cross
-
curricular expectations addressed and even provides student activity sheets to
complete.

Film:
Twelve



http://www.nfb.ca/film/twelve

Directed b
y
Lester Alfonzo


Produced by
Lea Marin


Production Agency

National Film Board of Canada

The film is approximately 43
-
minutes in length and investigates what it was
like to immigrate to Canada at the age of twelve. The director conducts
interviews with a number of people who recount their stories about
immigrating to a new country.



The Qik
iqtani Truth Commission

http://www.qtcommission.com/actions/GetPage.php?pageId=93

The Qikiqtani Truth Commission has been set up to investigate the truth and
consequences of forced r
esettlement on First Nations communities in Canada’s
north. This site contains a list of communities and the historical record of
when they were created and why. This will allow students to explore a unique
set of pull and push migration factors.



Natio
nal Geographic Society
-

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/

A great source for CURRENT maps, as political boundaries shift frequently in
our developing world, it is important that Social Studies teachers b
e up to
date in presenting maps to students for their learning. There are many other
uses for this resource, lesson plans, current issues, etc.


Guest Speaker

Invite a guest speaker(s) from the local community to share their personal
stories and experience
s with the students. This is a meaningful way for
students to connect real experiences of Canadians to information they have
learned about the causes and effects of migration.