How the Summit was Designed - NV Stem

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Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

1










2012 Nevada Statewide


Inaugural STEM

Coalition

Summit

Final Report




May 2012

Presented by Gathering Genius, Inc.







Our Lead Sponsors













Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

2


Table of Contents


Welcome Letter from United States Senator Harry Reid……………………………………………
…….
…3

Statement from Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval……………………………………………………………..4

Mission and Vision for Gathering
Genius, Inc………………………………………………………….….….….4

Inaugural STEM Summit Final Report Ex
ecutive Summary……………..………………………..
…….….5

Inaugural STEM Summit Final Report……………………………………………………………………………
.


7

Individual Roundtable Recommendations……………………………………………………………………..…10

Appendix


Attachment A:
Summit Participants
………………………………………………………………………………….….…18


Attachment B:
Gathering Genius, Inc. Board of
Directors

&

Advisory Committee
……………………23


Attachment C: Nevada STEM Coalition Advisory Committee
……………………………………….………....24


Att
achment D
: Nevada STEM Coalition Partners
……………………………………………………………….…….25


Attachment E
: Roundtable 1: Technology in Education Roundtable Summary
…………………..…...26


Attachment F
: Ensuring Diversity in Nevada’s STEM Student Pipeline Roundtable Summary
…27

Attachment G
: STEM Standards and Curriculum Roundtable Summary
………………………………….29

Attachment H
: Workforce Readiness Roundtable Summary
………………………………………………
..
…31

Attachment I
: STEM Student Pipeline to Higher Education Roundtable Summary
………….……...35

Attachment
J
: Informal Science Education Roundtable Summary
…………………………………………..39

Attachment K
: Teacher Education and Professional Development Roundtable Summary
….…...41







Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

3




Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

4



2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

















GATHERING GENIUS, INC.

MISSION AND VISION

Mission
:
Our mission is to promote leadership and collaboration among business, community, education, and
government stakeholders to develop nationally recognized science, technology, engineering, and mathematics
(STEM) education for ALL Nevada students EC
-
16.


Vision:

ALL Nevada students are provided the inspiration and opportunity to attain the necessary skills in
science, technology, engineering and math to be productive in their personal, work and civic lives. We look
forward to the day when Nevada pro
duces the skilled and innovative STEM workforce required to develop an
internationally competitive and diversified economy that attracts key industries to our state.









“STEM Education in Nevada supports the alignment of education and
workforce development to strategic economic
opportunities by
ensuring that our students and workforce possess the skills and
innovation to succeed in a diversified economy
.”

Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval

Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval


Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

5



2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit




Executive Summary

In March 2012 Gathering Genius, Inc. hosted the first statewide STEM summit in Las Vegas for 240 participants.
1

The participants represented Nevada stakeholders from education, community, business, and government, as
well as out
-
of
-
state business and educ
ation institutions
.
Many participants were members of the Nevada STEM
Coalition, a loosely knit group of individuals and organizations who support the mission of improving STEM
education in Nevada. Each had their own perspectives about the importance of science, technology,
engineering, and math (STEM) proficiency among Nevada’s students and teachers. Individual participants
attending the summit had some relationships with each other, but
the attendees had

never had an opportunity
like this to
assemble

and

discuss

common conc
erns and goals.



The summit goal was to build a sense of community among key interest groups and begin to mobilize resources
and volunteers to create a statewide STEM network and STEM strategic plan

in the coming year
. A common
goal among participants wa
s to
articulate

the importance of the role that STEM proficiency plays in developing
students ready for the workforce, certification programs, and higher education.


The summit was built around seven roundtable topics identified by interest groups from no
rthern and southern
Nevada

prior to the summit. Each participant

attended two roundtables over the course of the summit for in
-
depth discussions about the barriers and possible solutions to strengthening Nevada’s performance in these
areas.



1.

Technology
Infrastructure and Innovation,

2.

Ensuring Diversity in Nevada’s STEM Student Pipeline,

3.

EC
-
12 STEM Standards and Curriculum,

4.

Workforce Readiness,

5.

STEM Student Pipeline to Higher Education,

6.

Informal/Nonformal Education: Opportunities Beyond Conventional I
nstruction, and

7.

Teacher Preparation and Continuing Education.


Some common themes resonated throughout the summit. One of the most important is that STEM
must

be a
central and enduring thread throughout education K
-
12, not an option. Nevada cannot pro
duce the workforce
and student pipeline to college in the careers that
are

needed now and
will be most needed

in

the future
without ensuring that there is more focus on mathematics and science starting in kindergarten.
Children,
especially girls, are far l
ess likely to pursue STEM courses in high school and beyond unless they develop the
interest by about 4
th

grade.

There must be equity in access to STEM across all demographics if we are to
produce an adequate number of skilled workers and students pursui
ng STEM fields and careers.


Another critical theme was that s
chools cannot do this alone. A

strong
statewide
STEM agenda will require the
support
and

collaboration of community, educators, business and government. In order to
marshal

the vast and
tale
nted resources of our state

to support STEM education
, we propose t
o create a Nevada STEM network
--
a
communications and leadership system that ensures that teachers have ea
sier access to
research
-
based
STEM
curriculum
, resources,
and volunteers, and that v
olunteers and outside organizations such as nonprofits and
government agencies have more opportunities to become engaged.


Teachers and students need more access to STEM career role models, more field trips to understand
how

our
businesses
operate

and
what skills they need, and internship opportunities

to build interest and skills
; in sum, a
more consistent effort to link the classroom K
-
12 to careers.
Current efforts to provide opportunities for
students
to access

ACT skill testing and pursue credent
ials post high school need strong support to expand
statewide.





1

Generous lead sponsors included Southern Nevada Water Authority, NV Energy, Newmont Mines, Barrick Gold, the Redfield
Foundation,
Nevada Department of Education, and
Dorothy Lemelson.



Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

6



2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit




We need to provide teachers

significantly more
professional development

in subject matter content as well as in
STEM teaching practices. The Common Core Standards in mathematics and literacy have some standards in
common with the upcoming science standards
-
-
those that develop problem solving, higher order thinking,
identifyi
ng problems and solutions, and defending conclusions.
STEM teaching practices, with their emphasis on
hands
-
on, project
-
based instruction that develops problem solving and higher order skills, can address these
standards across the curriculum.


Finally,

there was much agreement that educators need help in
raising awareness among

community,
government, and business

stakeholders

about their successes as well as their need for support. Many ideas
emerged

for marketing, better news coverage, highlighting su
ccessful schools and career opportunities, and
highlighting

great role models in our community.


The board of Gathering Genius, Inc. urges
all interested
stakeholders to support us as we prepare for our next
round of workshops early this fall to develop
a Nevada STEM Network and marketing plan, support the NDE’s
ongoing science standards strategic planning, and
finalize ongoing stakeholder work in creating a matrix for
exemplary STEM teaching practices and exemplary STEM teacher professional development.

We are also
excited about a school STEM self assessment tool that will be a product of this upcoming workshop.







Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

7



2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit






I
n

March 2012 Gathering Genius, Inc. hosted the
first statewide STEM summit in Las Vegas for 240
participants.
2

The participants represented Nevada
stakeholders from education, community, business,
and government, as well as out
-
of
-
state business
and educat
ion institutions.

Many participants were
members of the Nevada STEM Coalition, a loosely
knit group of individuals and organizations who
support the mission of improving STEM education in
Nevada.
Each had their own perspectives about the
importance of sci
ence, technology, engineering, and
math (STEM) proficiency among N
evada’s students
and teachers
. Individual participants attending the
summit

had some relationships with each other, but
the attendees had

never had an opportunity like
this to
assemble

to ta
lk about common concerns
and goals.



OUR GOAL

WAS

TO BUILD A SENSE OF
COMMUNITY AMONG
KEY

INTEREST
GROUPS AND
BEGIN TO MOBILIZE
RESOURCES AND

VOLUNTEERS
TO
CREATE

A STATEWIDE STEM NET
WORK
AND STEM STRATEGIC P
LAN.


Coming into the summit, a common goal
among the
participants was the role STEM proficiency plays in
Nevada’s economic future. As an inaugural meeting
of this scale, the

summit was a venue for
stake
holders to identify barriers that stood between
the present day and a future where Nevada is
rout
inely
producing students ready for the
workforce or higher education
.


A focus on barriers was an appropriate undertaking
for a group at this scale. This is because a barrier
encountered by one sub
-
group might not be known
or understood by another sub
-
grou
p, and that
second group might actually have the wherewithal
to help mitigate or remove it. As a collective voice,
the group also has a more significant opportunity to
ma
ke recommendations for reform.


In this report
of

the inaugural S
ummit,
we
document th
e voices of the groups who worked




2

Generous lead sponsors included Southern Nevada Water
Authority, NV
Energy, Newmont Mines, Barrick Gold, the
Redfield Foundation, and Dorothy Lemelson.




together for two days discussing and debating their

views of STEM education in Nevada. A variety of

recommendations are provided, and while they are
categorized, they are not yet prioritized or culled in
any significa
nt way. Instead, this report serves to
document the “as
-
is” opinions of these informed
groups. O
ur hope is that the recommendations
serve as
context for constructive reforms in
legislation, policy, and district and school practice to
improve our national s
tanding and create a S
TEM
-

literate society in Nevada.


We
know

that the skills students learn in hands
-
on,
inquiry
-
based, real world problem
-
solving
activities
are the ones that our state ec
onomic sectors
desperately need. STEM, as an integrated concept,
is the platform of learning
that contribute
s

to many
careers that require critical thinking and innovation
.
These, in turn, are the jobs th
at can contribute to
our national security by producing our future
innovators and researchers.


H
OW THE
S
UMMIT WAS
D
ESIGNED


Participants were provided with a 152 page briefing
book
assembled by Gathering Genius, Inc.

(
http://www.nvstem.org/wp
-
content/uploads/2012/03/STEM
-
Coalition
-
Book.pdf
).
The briefing book included
documentation of practices from other states and
organizations that resulted in demonstrated STEM
advancement success for students and teachers
connected
to workforce improvement. This book
served as a research reference

as attendees
p
articipated in discussions and made
recommendations
.


Prior to the summit, the organizers designed the
interaction among the attendees to be around

seven
topics of concern in
Nevada’s STEM
education
. These were implemented at the Summit
as

roundtables

convened
by Nevada participants
with deep experience in the selected topics. The
roundtables were:


1.
Technology
Infrastructure and Innovation,

2.
E
nsuring Diversity in Nevada’
s S
TEM Student P
ipeline,

3.
EC
-
12 STEM Standards and Curriculum,

4.
Workforce Readiness,

Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit Final Report



Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

8



2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit




5.
STEM Student Pipeline to Higher Education,

6.
Informal/Nonformal Education: Opportunities Beyond



Conventional Instruction, and

7.
Teacher Preparation and Continuing Education.


By design, t
he roundtable conversations naturally
crossed topical boundaries
. The list of
recommendations that follow are drawn from the
individual round
tables and grouped by like
-
categ
ory
or theme
.

3


W
HAT
W
E
H
EARD


Some important themes resonated throughout the
roundtable conversations

during the summit. One
of the key issues was the
prevalence

of
comm
unications barriers statewide.

Participants
recognized that

many excellent resources,
individuals, organiz
ations, programs, and
opportunities
exist
in Nevada,
but stakeholders lack
awaren
ess or access to most of them
.
Community,
business, and government agency contributors
encounter barriers in their attempts to participate
in the education system.


A
COHER
ENT
SYSTEM
TO PROMOTE: (1)

COMMUNICATIONS

AMONG STAKEHOLDER
GROUPS,
(2) PROVIDE

CENTRALIZED
OPPORTUNITIES

FOR TEACHER RESOURCE
S

AND COLLABORATIONS,
AND
(3) ADVOCATE
FOR
STEM COMMUNITY
-
WIDE
WAS A
COMMON RECOMMENDATIO
N
.


STEM education is

rapidly becoming widely

recognized

in the nation and in Nevada

as essential
to providing a pipeline of competent students to
higher education

and producing a skilled workforce
.
B
ut
many educators expressed a need for further
definitions and available STEM

curriculum and
resources.

Science in particular has suffered from
neglect in elementary school due to

a

focus on
required assessments in reading and mathemati
cs.
There
was broad agreement at the S
ummit that
Nevada

need
s

an expanded statewide
focus

on
un
derstanding and promoting STEM education at all
levels and for all students.




3
The appendix
to this report
contains the separate roundtable
summary reports, and transcripts of the roundtable
conversations are available
at www.nvstem.org



W
HY
STEM

FOR
N
EVADA
?

AND
W
HY
N
OW
?

Participants
frequently observed that b
arriers to expansion

of
STEM teaching practices (curriculum
) include





adherence to more traditional
methods of teaching

(the “sage on stage”
vs.

learning facilitator)
,



tendency for education to be taught in silos,




lack of teachers
with

strong
command of
science and
mathematics,



lack of wide availability of

aligned, sustained,

and
sequenced

exemplary p
rofessi
onal development for
teachers, and



lack of equity in access to resources that are
required for multidisciplinary, hands
-
on, project
-
based curriculum that provides students with real
-
world experienc
e starting in elementary school.


BUILDING SUPPORT

FOR AND EXPANDING
STEM PRACTICES IS PA
RTICULARLY URGENT
BECAUSE
THESE TEACHING

PRACTICES ARE
NEEDED TO
FULLY
IMPLEMENT THE COMMON

CORE STATE STANDARDS

IN MATHEMATICS
AND READING

CURRENTLY BEING ROLL
ED OUT

IN NEVADA
, AS WELL AS THE NEW

SCIENCE
STANDARDS IN

THE PROCESS OF BEING

ADOPTED.


The state

need
s

to turn
its

attention to
preparing a
science standards strategic plan that

incorporates
all stakeholders
and to
assembling the resources for
the kinds of teacher training that will be required to
implement th
e new science standards.

A network
model of teacher training was recommended to
facilitate the development of statewide STEM
professional development yet also is responsive to
local needs.


The U.S. Census Bureau recent announced that over
50% of the babies born in the U.S. are from
historically underrepresented and underserved
populations. Nevada is not alone in its challenges to
ensure equal access to STEM education
for our
diverse populati
ons, and t
he Diversity R
oundtable
recommended the creation of a standing
committee
visible at the state level
to address these
issues.


STEM

MUST BE
A CENTRAL AND ENDURI
NG THEME
THROUGHOUT
K
-
12,

NOT AN
O
PTION
.

The participants
emphasized that addressing equity in access to
STEM education cannot be an “add on” to our

Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

9



2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit




curriculum; it has to be central. We have to start at
the elementary level to provide strong STEM access
to all. More focus on math and science, a
nd
support systems such as mentoring, professionals in
the classroom, and understanding of career
opportunities must occur if we are to be successful.


PREPARING A MORE SKI
LLED WORKFORCE IN
NEVADA WILL REQUIRE
THAT THE
COMMUNITY, EDUCATORS
, BUSINESS AND
G
OVERNMENT COLLABORAT
E, STARTING IN
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, T
O HELP STUDENTS
UNDERSTAND THE REAL
WORLD
APPLICA
TIONS OF WHAT THEY A
RE LEARNING.



As a collective community, Nevada
needs to
provide
many more role models and mentors, provide
field

trips and interns
hip opportunities, and a more
consistent effort to link the classroom K
-
12 to
careers.


The career and technical high school academies in
Nevada are already producing not only students
ready for the workforce, but they are also
graduating many students m
ore prepared for
college.
Often overlooked in the discussion of
STEM, w
e need to explore what successful practices
are used in these schools and how they
might be
more widely applicable in our education system.


W
HAT
N
OW
?


We now need to refine an organiz
ational structure
and communication system for STEM education
that can facilitate broader communications and
access to our assets, advocate for STEM,

and
increase

broad community awareness.
Several
organizations have already begun asset mapping
statewide.
To

achieve our goals, we need to
create
an aligned, focused, comprehensive
strategic plan
that

drives us to raising Nevada’s student
performance in STEM

and other

fields and produces
the sk
illed workforce and college bound population
that we need
.

The board of directors of Gathering
Genius,
Inc
.
hope
s

that these recommendations and
the barriers that were identified can serve as
resources as
we
provide leadership in assisting

Nevada’s stake
holders to

develop a state strategic
plan.


A multi
-
day workshop is being planned for
early

fall

2012 to
use these recommendations in the
design
of a system

to conne
ct STEM assets across the
state
.



A
TTITUDES OF THE
P
ARTICIPANTS
.

The results of a
Z
oomeran
g survey after the summit
are

encouraging. Feedback from 80 respondents.
4
:




80%
strongly

agreed the Summit “
provided

an
opportunity to share key challenges, goals, and
recommendat
ions regarding STEM education
.”



72% strongly agreed that the Summit “
provided
evidence regarding the need for improving students’
skills in STE
M starting with early childhood
.




9
9% strongly agreed
or agreed
that the Summit
met
the goal of

building a strong sense of community by
networking with other participants to build
e
xcellence in STEM education
.




68% strongly
agreed,


participants were able to
brainstorm stakeholder concerns from various
regions, districts and communities as a first s
tep in a
state needs assessment
.




90%
strongly agreed
or
agreed


t
he roundtable
structure facilitated input from all stakeholders.




80% strongly agreed or agreed “
the summit provided
ample time for networking w
ith other Nevada
stakeholders.




93% of participants either strongly agreed or
agreed


the briefing book provided participants

with the
background information, data, and current research
regarding STEM education in Nevada
.



TAKING THESE NEXT ST
EPS REQUIRES
COMMITTED AND PASSIO
NATE PARTICIPANTS,
NOT CHEERLEADERS FRO
M THE SIDELINES.


Keeping the momentum requires everybody’s help
and support. Let’s make it happen
for
Nevada.





4
K
-
12 edu
cators made up 66% of
the survey
r
espondents to
survey, followed by 11%
NSHE faculty 11%, 8% government
agency employees,
8% business and industry ,

4% community
members, and
6% other. See
www.nvstem.org

for survey



Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

10



2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STE
M Summit




R
OUNDTABLE
R
ECOMMENDATIONS


The following
tables summarize verbatim comments from the roundtable discussions. They are grouped into
themes that r
esulted from the crosscutting conversations. In reviewing this part of the documentation from the
inaugural STEM Summit meeting,
readers are encouraged to note the frequency and nuances of how certain
recommendations recur.

We chose to include all phrases
even though they may appear repetitive, rather than
consolidate, in this report because there are subtle differences in how one group or another chose to phrase
their recommendations. The
recommendations were developed in roundtables independently and shed

light
what became common themes over the two
-
day period.


C
OMMUNICATIONS



Scale up organizations already working to improve communications about career opportunities: Dream It Do It Nevada, Gathering

Genius, civic groups, the Governor’s Office of Economic Development and respective economic agencies, industry agencies, the
Nevad
a Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation, chambers of commerce, student associations like FBLA, SkillsUSA,
and community and nonprofit partners



Market our successes better through showcases, website, local media



Let students send the messag
e about their successes
in STEM

education through You Tube and websites



Promote stronger parental and community involvement



Make school STEM labs available to public to increase community engagement and scientific literacy



Support festivals financially
and as volunteers to engage community
-
parents, politicians, community



Scale up Industry/chamber of commerce partners



Develop student ambassador program



Ensure parents hear about opportunities for students, not just administrators



Solve problem of barriers
to organizations and businesses that would like to volunteer and provide programs by modifying school
requirements/scheduling
--
engage students to help recruit support



Create a central clearinghouse of community resources



Raise parent expectations for their

students' performance on CRT's



Provide parental training so parents can support their children more



There is no single point of contact on all sides

we need a bridge



Develop a messaging plan that promotes a culture change, where community and parents see
critical centrality of math and science
literacy for all students; use celebrities to help with message



Educate business as to what teachers need as far as resources and what they are teaching



Create business contact people



Schools need to develop their s
kills in asking businesses and the community for more help



Schools need to provide specific ideas for how the private sector can help. Teach the private sector volunteers how to engag
e with
the students



Ask Gathering Genius to lead the way on a PR campaig
n and be a repository of best practices



Community partnership coordinators have been very effective in interfacing with community help

scale this up



Conduct more asset mapping
--
Gathering Genius, Inc. could do this



Use Skype and other technologies to
assist in communications among educators



Build the culture that math is cool



Start a public relations blitz to support STEM education



Schools need to become more open to the community



Build website for counselors, parents, students to promote the career pa
ths of STEM



Create STEM “heroes”



Provide Informal education with access to marketing and be a part of a centralized database of resources and strategies. Sho
uld be
through the Nevada Department of Education.



Increase messaging regarding the unlimited car
eer choices available to students with excellent STEM academic credentials.



Business and industry could develop quality marketing about the importance of STEM



Increase communication with elementary education students



Develop communication that is cogniz
ant of the intimidation factor for some families, i.e., “degree,” credential, and stepping onto
college campuses.



Communicate and build awareness of value of high school diploma



Ensure that messaging includes “career ready” as well as “college ready”



Devel
op a statewide consistent messaging plan



Become proactive in our communications



Provide better statewide communication of job opportunities


Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

11



2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STE
M Summit





F
UNDING
STEM

E
DUCATION IN
N
EVADA



Connect teachers with funders
-
more effort from grant officers



The state needs to

commit to sustained funding to facilitate long
-
term planning



Guarantee resource equity for rural districts



The state legislature needs to provide funding for fundamental change in STEM education for materials, teacher training, reso
urces



Industry needs to

continue to expand funding and directly supporting good academic programs


T
EACHER
P
ROFESSIONAL
D
EVELOPMENT


P
RE
-
S
ERVICE
T
RAINING
,

C
ERTIFICATION
,

AND
R
E
-
C
ERTIFICATION



Change teaching paradigm from "sage on stage" to facilitator



Change pre
-
service teach
er training to prepare them for project based learning, to be STEM literate, to know how to teach
differently



Add coursework in STEM content and STEM integration
-
give teachers skills in interdisciplinary instruction



Add a STEM practices strand to each
pedagogy/methods course



Tie teacher recertification to professional development related to common core standards and application
-
a built
-
in way to ensure
that all teachers would have some access to either STEM or common core or
project
-
based

learning. Mor
e traditional teachers
struggle with project based learning and some leave



Legislative action is needed regarding teacher credentials and make it easier for industry experts to get into the classroom,

even if
on an adjunct basis



Pre
-
service training needs
to provide earlier and more extensive clinical practicums and more experience in real classrooms



Pre
-
service training for counselors for STEM expectations


T
EACHER
P
ROFESSIONAL
D
EVELOPMENT


O
NGOING



Increase sustained professional development for both te
achers and administrators



The state needs a professional development model that would become part of a Nevada STEM Network



An ideal professional development model is nested and builds interdependent layers of knowledge and resources
-
a formal strategic
plan

with vision and goals



More teacher PD for use of technology



Teacher professional development must better integrate content and practice



Improve coordination and coherence statewide in professional development



Professional development MUST build on previou
s training
-
right now teachers may attend sessions and workshops that have no
connection to each other



Statewide communications and a clearly articulated vision are required to implement a new professional development model that

is
flexible and adapts to lo
cal settings and needs



Ensure professional development is more readily available to rural districts



Expand site
-
based teacher training
-
bring the experts to the schools



Prepare specialty academic advisors for STEM



Current professional development is someti
mes so broad it isn’t useful to the teachers

focus training



Expand and focus professional development activities vertically
-
teachers from multiple grade levels focusing on a discipline
-
elementary, middle, and high school



Teachers must received increased
training in awareness of cultural diversity



The focus at the student level (for both pre
-
service and practicing teachers) should be on supporting student learning of STEM
content as articulated in the draft STEM Foundational Principles, published in the 2
012 STEM Coalition Summit Briefing Book,
Common Core math and reading standards, and the upcoming New Framework Science Standards



Professional development and pre
-
service training should develop skills in how to support ALL students in learning STEM skil
ls, as
outlined in the National Research Council publication,
How People Learn.



Principals must provide opportunities for (1) consistent, ongoing relevant professional development, (2) opportunities for te
achers
to collaborate and network, and (3) access t
o more knowledge and resources



Nevada’s regional professional development centers can capitalize on teacher leaders to spread STEM knowledge and skills and
should continue to provide opportunities for long term, sustainable professional development



Districts are also responsible for providing professional development



Provide summer professional development as part of an 11 month contract
-
provide two months to learn, not teach





Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

12



2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STE
M Summit




T
EACHER
S
UPPORT BY THE
C
OMMUNITY



We must go beyond "token" STEM
education
--
we must convince administrators and teachers who don't believe in doing science or
integrating math into other subjects, or doing application to engineering that this is critical to addressing the new Common
Core
standards and the upcoming Scie
nce Framework standards



To teach science well, you need to incorporate literacy instruction for reading difficult text
--

have students journal, write, develop a
hypothesis



Teachers must be given time to connect standards from different disciplines, which r
equires more work and time



Develop a support and
communication system

for teachers who are all working to develop STEM skills
--

develop ways for teachers
to serve as resources to each other and for more collaboration



Develop a central
place to

help teacher
s find Nevada’s abundant resources and facilitate teacher access to these resources; for
example, Increase awareness of Wiki
-
teacher in CCSD, where best teachers are filmed and they share lessons



Ensure teacher support is available to rural districts



Expand teamwork with universities



Develop centers for math, science, engineering



Give teachers incentives to experiment with different models of teaching and not penalize them for taking that time



Give teachers who are interested the opportunity to visit m
odel teachers, K
-
12



Invest in teachers and make them feel more like professionals



We must help teachers know how to, in project based education
, measure

student engagement, time on task, attendance, drop
-

out
rate, etc.



Help educators understand that the
same qualities required to solve math and science problems are present in the arts

these are
real world problems people have addressed since time began



Develop an advanced mentoring program pairing master teachers with new teachers K
-
12



Partner more with i
ndustry to expand teacher understanding of the application of STEM practices to the real world



Restructure the school day to allow more professional development and teacher collaboration



Provide more teacher and counselor internship exposure to career path
s



Learn what works by establishing a K
-
16 data set to track student paths (this is in progress), tie to high school assessment, and track
students through to job attainment



Explore alternative ways to identify accountability and do assessment “STEM accoun
tability”



Many teachers would like to integrate scientific methods and inquiry activities much better into teaching

math with English, for
example

we must focus
on improved

teacher access to exemplary interdisciplinary project
-

based lessons



See students
as a successful “product” of a partnership among university, industry, and K
-
12 schools



Produce and distribute videos of successful scientists; bring scientists to schools



Improve and increase specific feedback to students, schools and teachers to improve
remedy of problems. The focus on exit exams
is more like an “autopsy” than anything else



To have STEM practices in a school, the administrator needs to know what STEM is, what it looks like, and what to expect from

teachers



Principals must have a vision o
f STEM education and share it with their schools. They must show what it going to look like and what
pathway to take, that helps make STEM happen



Principals must serve as
instructional leaders

and support teachers to teach STEM curriculum



Districts have t
he responsibility to develop teacher leaders and provide implementation specialists



Teacher leaders and principals
should communicate

with district leaders about school STEM implementation needs



ALL districts, not just larger ones, need to have access to
the resources and to provide more professional development and
administrator/teacher collaboration
--
just putting in a STEM lab is not sufficient


STEM

A
DVOCACY AND
S
TATE
L
EADERSHIP



Industry should go to the legislature on behalf of supporting STEM educa
tion



Everyone, from the state superintendent on down, including the legislature, must be involved to stop the suppression of STEM
teaching



State leadership should come from district PR staff, students, peers, chambers of commerce, grant staff, school
boards and industry
partners





Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

13



2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STE
M Summit





C
URRICULUM


A
LL
L
EVELS



We need to develop school wide expectations that STEM is central to learning and developing critical thinking
-
EVERY CHILD
BENEFITS, INCLUDING STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS



Make STEM a theme for
entire schools



Teach relevance of science and mathematics much earlier than 10
-
12th grade



Students need more exposure to the real world
--
more STEM activities starting in elementary school



More vertical alignment and articulation of STEM practices
--
STEM pra
ctices need to flow vertically so that students don't run into a
school that is siloed



Less frequent changes to pedagogy



Prepare teachers and schools for problem based learning that will be required for new science standards



More student access to project
based learning



More integration of subjects K
-
12 to help students understand math and apply skills



Get STEM professionals into the classrooms through more realistic changes to certification requirements and as volunteers and

mentors



Build STEM into the sta
tewide curriculum (note: the Common Core Standards in Math and Reading as well as the new Framework
for Science Standards requires some STEM practices)



We need competency
-

based promotion, not grade level promotion



Add more STEM teaching specialists



Create

formal expectations for the integration of K
-
12, industry, and colleges



Teach more in depth on core topics (the new science standards will emphasize this)



Develop more STEM resources for students using the technology they already use, i.e. You Tube



Better

degree alignment using applied information systems



Improve the anti
-
math attitudes by linking curriculum more clearly to career paths in STEM



Identify what existing standards are already "STEM standards" and be sure teachers emphasize those standards



Addr
ess science illiteracy



Use modular themes
--
STEM integration or conceptual themes across classes with consultant input


C
URRICULUM
-

E
LEMENTARY



Spread message that the Common Core standards are all about integration of curriculum, which
is also

what the teaching philosophy
of STEM pedagogy is about
-
we need to address this to meet CCSS standards and upcoming science framework standards, which
require problem based learning and subject integration



Use science and social studies as vehicles to teac
h math and language arts and stop segregating subjects, as the upcoming common
core assessments will require that students demonstrate skills that can be acquired through project
-
based learning



Support more rigor in elementary school math
-
the Common Core S
tandards do this, but are we providing adequate state wide
professional development to ensure the implementation of the new standards?



We have to start at the pre
-
kindergarten level getting students interested in science and STEM (this is backed by qualita
tive studies)



Solve reality/perception that teachers much teach to test rather than to standards



Universal kindergarten to give students a major head start



Solve the assessment problem
-
teachers feel “strangled” by current assessment practices
--
the assessme
nt system has nothing to do
with project
-
based learning
.


C
URRICULUM


M
IDDLE
S
CHOOL



Expand middle and high school hands
-
on activities through class projects or career and technical education classes



Assessments currently focus away from science
-
address
the impact of this



Schools should have STEM academic advisors



Increase the focus on math
-
smaller class sizes at middle and high school are essential



Middle school projects can be assessed just as in business, with smaller assessments of essential skills du
ring a project so that final
project is measured as to how students apply those essential skills





Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

14



2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STE
M Summit





C
URRICULUM


H
IGH
S
CHOOL



Apply in other schools the strategies used by career and technical education academies to meet needs of lower performing
student
s
--

don't track students into lower level classes, as they never catch up



More high school
schedule flexibility
-
so many requirements mean that students can't take career or tech education or do cross
curriculum projects



Allow students to get their lectures

on video and then come to class for hands
-
on learning
-
(see Southwest Academy in CCSD for
model)



Eliminate out
-
of
-
field teaching



Allow more student choice in classes in high school



Solve disconnect between proficiency pass scores and students who need
college remediation



Align curriculum to workforce needs



Provide calculus in high school for college bound engineering students



Change mindset of high school culture of just meeting minimum to graduate


I
NFORMAL AND
O
UT
-
OF
-
S
CHOOL
S
CIENCE
E
DUCATION



Students need more access to big projects outside of the classroom (extracurricular) so that they can apply skills and share
challenges and triumphs



Provide more online student support, especially for students who don’t have parental support or come from r
ural areas



Informal education access for rural students



Provide more intervention for older students who are weak in common core standards so that they can access STEM career track
s



Bring visiting graduate students to after school programs



ISE provides a
safe learning environment that is more inclusive.



Expand ISE, as it has demonstrated values and results, and it grounds education in real world experience



ISE helps to validate the work that formal educators are doing



ISE can help provide prior knowledge a
nd experiences that will assist students learn in the classroom



ISE needs to be aligned with standards but also with the school curriculum calendars



ISE requires administrative support and buy
-
in
-
it is hindered when it is isolated among just a few teachers



ISE needs access to research tools and databases to document results



Leverage the positive impact of ISE with its ability to create a community that is fun to be in, that is enriching, that is a
ttractive to
industry, and that provides rich learning experi
ences



Utilize informal education to drive interest and motivation to career paths within Nevada industries and serve as a recruitme
nt tool
for industry



Leverage the ability of ISE to attract visitors and tourism



Nevada Department of Education needs to crea
te a culture of understanding and support for ISE, advocate for ISE, streamline the
process to make it easy to access opportunities, provide data and stories to validate the connections between formal and info
rmal
education, provide access to data to docum
ent success, and line item funding for ISE opportunities



Provide a centralized database of ISE resources with effective marketing and dissemination plan



Economic development agencies should speak to the value of ISE and its role in education and support it

with their activities.



ISE should provide rigorous curriculum be accountable to high standards
--
transition ISE’s role as a provider to one of being a partner



Need to collect data on the impact of alternative learning on STEM education and readiness, parti
cularly with respect to museums.


P
OST
-
S
ECONDARY
/

H
IGHER
E
DUCATION



Expand the STEM teaching concepts to higher education
--
we see university professors paid more for lecturing and the graduate
students do the labs, which is modeled at the K
-
12 level



Higher education needs to recruit students more aggressively



Expand/sustain partnerships between districts and colleges for remediation (example is TMCC and WCSD Success First program)





Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

15



2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STE
M Summit





C
AREER AND
W
ORKFORCE
D
EVELOPMENT



Gathering Genius, Inc. should
ask Dream It Do It to address the barriers and recommendations in conjunction with their DIDI
Nevada Plan.



Scale up current effective programs that communicate career readiness include industry
-
led teacher workshops from the
mining industry and NV Energy;
existing opportunities for factor tours; industry financial and in kind support to education
programs; and industry participation in career days, science fairs, robotic competitions, etc.



Expand the CCSD career and technical education programs that are pr
oducing students who are career ready (and many
students exit from these programs college ready as well)



Scale up middle school career exploration through industry partnerships



Ensure career and workforce development access for rural students



Build a caree
r criteria matrix for students with different professional interests



Early introduction for
students to

the pathways to STEM careers, communicate what career opportunities are available and
what programs students should take to position themselves to take
advantage of them



Provide many more internship opportunities for students



Collect data describing what our kids want to be when they grow up



Address the issues of how local control and provincialism hinder change in the education system



Improve education s
tatistics



Increase teacher access to employers



Increased our collective political will to make change



Industry should address its misperceptions of education


R
ESOURCES FOR
STEM

AND
C
AREER
R
EADINESS



Existing certificates/industry credential programs



Industry partners (mock interviews, mentorships, career fairs, tours, existing curriculum and established


career pathways)



We have a skilled workforce (they are working)



Apprenticeship programs (particularly with organized labor)



CTE programs/career acade
mies (especially in Clark and Washoe counties)



Washoe: AACT (medical, arts, veterinarian); tech and college credit programs; signature academies



Industry willingness to engage



Advisory committees in education both at state and local level



National partners
hips (the Manufacturing Institute, the Lumina Foundation for Education, etc.)



Career data bases (NCIS and NAV101)



Strong technical/science
-
based career opportunities in manufacturing, health care, mining, energy, etc.



Businesses want to hire



We do have hig
hly qualified teachers



We have a skilled retired workforce



Foundations and scholarships



Industry asset donation



Upward bound programs



Job s for America’s Grads



Project Lead the Way



FIRST Robotics



Industry
-
developed curriculum (Right Skills Now, for
example, at TMCC and WNC)



Industry support for educational programs (factory tours, supply of parts, financial contributions and


sponsorships, career day participation, etc.)



ACT Work Keys infrastructure in workforce system, providing the National Career
Readiness Certificate



Lego League



Self
-
assessment testing leading to careers



An education articulation plan needs to be developed for the Brookings Institution report





Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

16



2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STE
M Summit





E
QUITY AND
A
CCESS FOR
N
EVADA

S
D
IVERSE
P
OPULATION



Technology is essential for true
STEM education; right now it is not required, so there is a real equity gap. You can widen the gap if
you implement more STEM education

in some schools

but don’t require
all
schools to provide it



Bring more role models and mentors into the schools



Develop mobile STEM labs for rural areas



Link college students to after school STEM programs at K
-
12 schools



Feature a local pool of diverse engineers, scientists, through video, web, broadening classroom access/technology



STEM needs to move from the realm

of an abstract concept to reality in the classroom and be promoted by all stakeholders
--
we all
need to affirm the value of STEM education for the future careers of both the majority and minority populations for the futur
e
growth of our state and nation



W
e need a true paradigm shift from existing teaching strategies to hands
-
on programs that link learning to real
-
world conditions
that apply to students’ lives and future careers



Businesses can and should render the right guidance to schools on future career
s by visiting schools and forecasting future
employment skills needs



Industry internships for students



Industry should conduct a continuous dialogue of industry’s current and future workforce requirements



One of the key barriers is the lack of teachers q
ualified to teach STEM disciplines and the additional costs of integrating core subject
curriculum



Nevada must have a dedicated focus on providing STEM education to our underrepresented student population, beginning with an
early focus in elementary school




We must not assume that providing STEM enhancement for some can become access for all



There is a disproportionate access for higher STEM curriculum in affluent schools
--
diversity strategic plans cannot be a footnote to
other STEM recommendations; they m
ust be central



Create a dedicated task force in the STEM Coalition/Gathering Genius, Inc. to ensure that diversity is addressed in all aspe
cts of the
strategic plan for Nevada



Nevada’s critical crossroad for a current and future skilled workforce cannot

be improved without improvement of its STEM
education and access for underrepresented populations
--
this is the pipeline for economic growth within the state as well as the
nation’s diverse next
-
generation labor force.


Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

17



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report






A
PPENDIX



Attachment A:
Summit Participants

Attachment B:
Gathering Genius, Inc. Board of Directors and Advisory Committee

Att
achment C
: Nevada STEM Coalition Advisory Committee

Attachment
D
: Nevada STEM Coalition Partners

Attachment
E
: Technology in Education Roundtable
Summary

Attachment
F
:
Ensuring Diversity in Nevada’s STEM Student Pipeline Roundtable Summary

Attachment
G
:

STEM Standards and Curriculum Roundtable Summary

Attachment
H
: Workforce Readiness Roundtable
Summary

Attachment
I
:

STEM Student Pipeline to Higher Education Roundtable Summary

Attachment
J
:

Informal Science Education Roundtable Summary

Attachment
K
: Teacher Education and Professional Development Roundtable Summary



Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

18



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




Attachment A:
Summit Particip
ants


Asay

Loretta

CCSD




Avila
-
Porter

Patty

TMCC




Bacon

Ray

Nevada Manufacturing Assoc.



Baer

Tina

NVRPDP




Bailey

Janelle

UNLV Center for Mathematics, Science, Engineering
Education

Ballard

Christina

CCSD




Bauman

Kimberly

CCSD




Beck

Erica

SNC




Begley

Jonathan

Nevadaworks




Behuniak

Anna Maria

CCSD




Bernard

Rene

Lyon CSD




Bettencourt

Jessica

NV INBRE/UNR




Bishop

Valerie

WCSD




Booker

Nicholle

UNLV / NV IMBRE




Borda

Pam

Elko County Economic Development Authority

Bortolin

Greg

DRI




Brancamp

David

NWRPDP




Braunstadter

Sandra

Elko CSD




Briggs

Cammie

White Pine HS, White Pine SD


Brody

Allison

Exhibit IQ




Bryan

Tommi Ann

Tronox, LLC




Burns

Melissa

Naval Air Station Nevada



Bushey

Gail

Nevada Great
Explorations in Math and Science Site

Bybee

Rodger

consultant for Next Generation Science Standards project

Byrnes

Valerie

Northeastern Nevada RPDP



Cannon

Kelly

WCSD




Carmack

Christi

NSC




Carroll

Kris

CCSC




Carter

Dan

Davidson Academy




Carver

Andrea

Hyde Park MS, CCSD



Casella

Michele

EPSCoR




Collier

Robert

Western Nevada College



Costella

Ryan

Clickbond, Inc.




Coudriet

Lise

Lyon CSD




Cranor

Erin

CCSD




Cross

Ryan

Lyon CSD




Crowther

David

UNR




Cruz

Jaime

Workforce
Connections



Curley

Tami

WCSD, Sparks HS




Decker

Kathleen

CCSD Bracken magnet



DeLeon

Andre

NV DOE




DeRosa

Melody

Texas Instruments




Dewberry

Susan

CPO Science




Dhalai

Hamedah

NV Energy




Dickson

James

CCSD




Divine

Darren

CSD




Dorofachuck

MaryJane

NV Arts Council





Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

19



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




Easler

Doretha

NV Energy




Elcano

Joe

KNPB




Ellsworth

Julie

TMCC




Ericksen

Jody

Lyon CSD




Espinoza

Nicole

CCSD




Fadness

Claudia

Lyon CSD




Fajota

Venus

NV DETR




Farley

John

UNLV




Flaherty

Linda

Lyon CSD




Fleming

Patty

Churchill




France

Shannon

Hillside ES, Storey CSD



Frazier

Lisa

Great Basin College



Frewert

Dee

Space Science for Schools, Inc.


Fritsen

Chris

DRI




Gale

Vicky

Lyon CSD




Gamboa

Alex

Envirolutions




Gardner

John

DRI




Gianotti

James

Lyon CSD




Gilligan

Eileen

CCSD
-
CPD




Gobbs
-
Hill

Sarah

NVDM




Good

John

Exhibit IQ




Grace

John

Lyon CSD




Graves

Terra

WCSD




Green

Mary

O'Brien Middle School,
WCSD




Green

Jennifer

Lyon CSD




Grisham

Anne

Sandy
Searles Miller Academy IB World School

Gruber

Tracy

DOE




Gussak

George

Dream It Do It Nevada



Guttman

Paul

Space Science for Schools, Inc.


Hall

Raymond

CCSD




Hall

Rachele
Marie

Lyon CSD




Handzel

Diane

Get in the Act!




Handzel

Gary

Get in
the Act!




Hansen

Eric

Lincoln County SD




Hanses

Lori

Lyon CSD




Hargrove

John

NV Energy




Harrison

Chris

West Ed




Harrison

Chris

WestEd




Hart

Andrew

Nevada Outdoor School



Hasan

Deniz

UNLV




Hawkins

Sue

Newmont Mining Corporation



Herring

Thomas

Western Nevada College



Hey

Patty

CCSD




Heyman

Sharon

CCSD




Hogan

Billiejo

Lyon CSD




Hopkins

Janelle

CCSD




Huckaby

James N.

Lyon CSD




Huckaby

James

Lyon CSD





Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

20



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




Humphrey

Melissa

Lyon CSD




Hutter

Collie

Clickbond, Inc.




Ingram

Opal

CCSD




Jacobson

Robert

Lyon CSD




Janison

Terri

former member, Gov. Office Econ Dev


Jensen

David

Humboldt CSD




Johnson

Eric

CCSD




Jones

Robert

Lyon CSD




Kaiser

Susan

WSCD




Kay

Elizabeth

National Academy Foundation



Keglovits

Russ

Nevada Dept. of Education



Keller

Brooke

Lyon CSD




Keller

April

WCSD




Keppelmann

Edward

UNR College of Science



Kern

Cindy

CCSD




Kimble

Janie

ECSD





Kinsey

Marlo






Knecht

Georgette

WCSD




Knight

Debby

Elko CSD




Krch

Julie

Learning Bridge Charter



Krch

Warren

Learning Bridge Charter



Kuzia

Joanna

Lyon CSD




Kyser

Alex

Dept of Education




LaBuda

Jim

NSC




Lamberg

Teruni

UNR




Lange

Marci

Lyon CSD




Levy

Donna

Career & Technical Education



Litster

Megan

UNLV




Loftin

Lou

NNRPDP




Loftin

Traci

WSCD




Losoponkul

Nita

WCSD




Lousignont

Beverly

Bailey MS, CCSD




Luce

Leigh

DCSD




Luna

Cherri

CCSD




March

Theodor

Lyon CSD




Marconi

Elizabeth

CCSD




Marich

Holly

NNRPDP




Mason

Larry

consultant




Matheson

Michelle

Lyon Cty SD




Mayers

Alicia

WCSD




McClish

Marissa

O'Brien MS, WCSD



McDonald

Bentley

Nevada for Education



McElwain

David

CCSD




McIntosh

Caroline

Lyon CSD




Meihock

Scott

Churchill CSD




Meisner

Dave

Elko
County SD




Mejia

Mirna

EPSCoR




Melendrez

Jose

UNLV




Miller

David

CCSD




Miller

Sandy

Community Leader





Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

21



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




Miller

Virginia
Mae

Lyon CSD




Moore

Susan

Office of Lt. Governor Brian Krolicki


Morehouse

Genevieve

WCSD




Moyle

Heather

Lyon CSD




Navarrete

Lori

NSC




Neal

Susan

Elko County




Neddenriep

Katie

Barrick Gold of North America



Newburn

Mark

Vizics Inc.




Oates

Matt

WCSD




Olson

Ursula

Reed HS, WCSD




Olson

Travis

UNLV




Ort

Cory

CPO Science




O'Toole, PhD

Brendan

Coll

of Engineering, UNLV



Owens
-
West

Rose

West Ed




Owens
-
West

Rose

WestEd




Park

Maureen

Lyon CSD




Pearson

Sharon

CCSD




Perry

David

Lyon CSD




Petersen

Laura

WCSD




Philpott

Stephen

First NV




Pike

Mary

CCSD




Ploucher

Dale





Porter

Tim

UNLV




Puhl

J
-
Petrina

WCSD




Quintana

Joe

Newmont




Reece

Lenette

Bailey

MS CCSD




Remaley

Jasper

WCSD




Rincon

Mark

Sepulveda Elementary, WCSD


Roberts

William

Nye County SD




Robinson

Mike

Dept. of CI UNR




Roseberry

Tamara

Lyon CSD




Rosen

Richard

Teaching Institute for Excellence in STEM

Ross

Carolyn

Churchill Cty SD




Ross

Karen

NV Energy




Rubins

Beth

Workforce Connections



Rumbaugh

Kelly

Lyon CSD




Salem

Bryan

Bonanza HS CCSD



Sanderson

Jason

Lyon CSD




Schiemer

Karen

CCSD




Schrader

PG

UNLV




Scoggin

Sylvia

WCSD




Scott

Melissa

Dept of Education




Shaney

Bridget

Workforce Connections



Shih

Jeff

UNLV




Shirley

Charles

Lyon CSD




Sibley

Bret

SNRPDP




Simmonds

Richard

UNR




Skramstad

Erik

ccsd




Smith

Neysia

Lyon CSD





Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

22



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




Smith

Michelle

Elko CSD




Solonche

Lee

Vegas PBS




Speer

William

College of Education, UNLV



Spicer

Yvonne

Boston Museum of Science



Staffen

Karen

Storey Cty SD




Stater

Rick

Tronox, LLC




Stegman

Camille

NSSTA Storey
County



Stevens

John

Lyon CSD




Stewart

Sara

CCSD




Stockton

Shannon

Lyon CSD




Stone

Dan

CPO Science




Sweeney

Betsy

Elko CSD




Swobe

Caryn

NVDM




Thomas

Grayling

Lyon CSD




Thomson

Connie

NNRPDP




Thorpe

Terry

Mineral County




Thran

Brandolyn

Army Public Health Command



Timmons

Jeanne

Creative Learning Systems



Troutman

Porter

UNLV




Tun

Ruby

Eagle Valley MS, Carson City SD


Unger

Dana

Lyon CSD




Vidoni

Kim

NV Dept. of Ed.




Vine

Freda

Clark HS, CCSD




Vineyard

Richard

Dept. of Education




Wadas

Guy

CCSD




Waggoner

Karen

Hyde Park MS, CCSD



Wagner

Mary Kay

Nevada Division of Environmental Protection

Walenta

Elizabeth

Davidson Academy




Ward

Paula

Nye County SD




Wells

Beth

Gathering Genius, Inc.



Wells

Steve

DRI




Wells

Bill

AtaPros LLC




Wells

Bobbie

AtaPros LLC




Whitcome

Christine

Eagle Valley Middle School Carson SD


White

Tifferney

Lied Discovery Children's Museum


Willden

Jennifer

Storey County




Williams

Robert

Nye CSD




Williams

Rich

Space Science for Schools, Inc.


Williams

Kimberly

Nevada State College



Wong

Aaron

NSC




Woodbeck

Frank

DETR




Workman

Wayne

Lyon CSD




Yarsley

John

Lyon CSD




Young

Susan

WCSD




Zamora

Margie

CCSD




Zeiszler

Brian

Elko HS








Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

23



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




Attachment B:
Gathering Genius, Inc. Board of Directors

& Advisory Committee

Stephen G. Wells, Ph.D.

President




President, DRI

Carol Lucey, Ph.D.

Vice

President



Pr
esident, Western Nevada College

Susan Moore, Ed.D.

Vice President



Senior Policy Advisor to Lt. Governor Brian Krolicki


Richard Simmonds, D.V.M., M.S.


Treasurer


r
etired NSHE Veterinarian


Ryan Costella

Secretary






Dir.of Strategic Initiatives, Click Bond, Inc.

Allison Brody,

D.
A.






Director of Programs, Exhibit IQ

Paul Buck, Ph.D.







a
rch
aeologist, DRI; instructor, NSC



Robert Casaceli







mining consultan
t; former CEO of Franc
-
Or Resources Corp.

David Crowther, Ph.D.





Professor of
Science
Education, UNR

Mo Denis






NV State Senator, Legisl. Comm. On Education

Julie Ellsworth






Prof.

of
biology, Truckee Meadows Community College

John Gardner






Special Assistant to the President, DRI

Tracy Gruber






K
-
6 Mathematics

Specialist, Nevada Dept. of Education

Doug Hill






VP, General Counsel, Intermountain West Communications

Larry Mason






consultant

David Miller, M.A.





Coordinat
or, Secondary Science, Clark County SD

Sandy Miller







former
First Lady of N
evada

Matt Oates





STEM Coordinato
r
,
Dilworth STEM Academy

Stephen

A.

Philpott





FIRST NV volunteer
, former owner, Bearing Belt Chain Co.

Mary Pike, M.A.









Dir.
K
-
12 Sci
ence, Health, PE,
For.

Language
,
& Driver Ed, Clark


County SD

Camille Stegman
, M.Ed.





Past Pres. NV Science Teachers Association, Lead Tchr,



Science, Storey County SD

Freda Vine
, MS Ed.





Teacher, Clark High School/STEM Mentor Program, Clark County SD

Richard Vineyard, Ph.D.





Asst. Director of
Assessment,
NV Dept. of Education



Bill Wells, M.S.E.









Technical Director, ATAPROS, LLC

Bobbie Heaton Wells, C.P.A




Financial Director, ATAPROS, LLC



Don Bailey,

board member emeritus



retired Nevada State Pr
inter


Beth
Wells,

M.A.

Executive Director



board member ex officio











Advisory Committee

Mr. Robert Davidson, Founder of Davidson Academy

Mrs. Jan Davidson, Founder of Davidson Academy

Ms. Frankie Sue Del Papa, attorney, former Nevada Attorney
General

Ms. Jill Derby, former member Nevada System of Higher Education Board of Regents

Mr. Bruce James, former U.S. Printer

Marc Johnson, Ph.D., President, UNR

Caroline McIntosh, Superintendent, Lyon County School district

Shar Peterson, Senior External
Relations for Phoenix Mine, Newmont Mining

U.S. Senator Harry Reid,
Nevada

Michael Richards,
Ph. D.
President, College of Southern Nevada

P.G. Schrader, Ph.
D.,
Assoc. Professor, Dep
t. of Curr. & Instruction, UNLV

Maria Sheehan, Ph.D., President, Truckee
Meadows Community College

Neal Smatresk, Ph.D., President, UNLV

Joyce Woodhouse, former NV Assemblywoman


Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

24



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




Attachment C
: Nevada STEM Coalition Advisory Committee

The Nevada STEM Coalition Committee is a group of community
educators and leaders

who have advised G² Inc.
in

establishing goals and objectives, provided professional advice and leadership for the Coalition, recruited
partners, and promoted
STEM education in the state.

Crystal Abba, M.A., Assoc. Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student

Affairs, Nevada System of Higher Education

Loretta Asay, B.A. science education, M.S. technology, Instructional Technology and Innovative Projects,


Curriculum and Prof. Dev. Division, Clark County School District

David Brancamp,
Director, Northern Nevada Regional Professional Development Program

Kelly Cannon, M.A., Science Coordinator, Washoe County School District

Brian Crosby, teacher, Agnes Risley Elementary School, Washoe County School District

John Crowther, Ph.D., Assoc. Pro
fessor, Dept. of Curriculum & Instruction, UNR

André E.
DeLeón, Education Programs Professional: K
-
12 Science, Nevada Department of Education

Joe Elcano, Mgr. of Education Services, KNPB

Jacque Ewing
-
Taylor, Interim Executive Director, Raggio Research for
STEM Education, UNR

Dee Frewert, Education and Development Director, Space Science for Schools, Inc. Northern NV FIRST Director

John Gardner, Special Assistant to the President, DRI

Sarah Gobbs
-
Hill, Program Director, Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museu
m

John Good, President, Exhibit IQ

Laurie Anne Grimes,
MA, CPST, CLE,

State Bicycle and Pedestrian Education & Information Officer, NV Department of Public



Safety
,
Office of Traffic Safety

Tracy Gruber, Mathematics Consultant, NV Dept. of Education

Rus
s Keglovits, Mathematics Program Professional 7
th
-
12
th

grade, Nevada Department of Education

Ed Keppelmann, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. of Mathematics/ Science Outreach Coordinator for the Coll. of Science, UNR

Deanna Kowal
-
Jaskolski, Principal, Jim Bridger Middle

School, CCSD

Teruni Lamberg, Ph.D., Assoc. Professor, Department of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning, UNR

Donna Levy, Coordinator for Career and Technical Education, CCSD

Melissa Licon, MS Coordinator, WCSD

Lou Loftin, M.A., Science Teacher Trainer,
Northern Nevada Regional Professional Development Program

Cherri Luna, science specialist, Schorr Elementary School, CCSD

Larry Mason, Chief of Diversity, CSN, former member of CCSD school board

Camille McCue, President, Pea Brain, Inc.

David McElwain, Coo
rdinator, Career and Technical Education, CCSD

Susan Neal, Technology, Elko County School District

Matt Oates, Science Specialist, Dilworth Middle School, WCSD

Lisa Riggs, Project Administrator, Signature Academies, WCSD

Ricci Rodriguez
-
Elkins, M.Ed., Prin
cipal, E
-
Techs Charter
HS, former Pres. of the Center For Charter School Dev.

Carolyn Ross, Ph.D., Superintendent of Churchill County School District

Maria Sheehan, Ph.D., President of Truckee Meadows Community College

Brett Sibley, Southern Nevada Region
al Professional Development Program

Lee Solonche, Educational Media Services, Vegas PBS

Camille Stegman, President, Nevada State Science Teachers Association

Elisa Storke, TESOL Instructor, PhD Candidate in Science education, UNR

Caryn Swobe, Swobe Strate
gies

Brandolyn Thran, microbiologist, US Army Public Health

Kim Vidoni, Ph.D., Ed. Technology Coordinator, NV Department of Education



Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

25



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




Attachment D
: Nevada STEM Coalition Partners

The Coalition is building a statewide membership of individuals, organizatio
ns, and business partners who share
a mission to improve Nevada’s STEM education. We seek partners who are ready to work together to advocate;
educate the public; share knowledge; and to build capacity, sustainability, quality, and access for ALL of
Nevada
’s students.
Contact us

to become a partner!

Challenger Learning Center.

Paul McFarlane
, Lead Flight Director

Churchill County School District
. Carolyn Ross, Superintendent

CURB Technologies.

Inc.

Jeff Sunderman, CEO

Dream It Do It.

Nevada.

Ryan Costella

DRI
. Stephen G. Wells, President

Elko County School District

Exhibit IQ.
John Good, President and Executive Producer

FIRST NV.

Jean Hoppert

Gathering Genius, Inc.

Beth Wells, Executive Director

GreenPower. DRI

iNNOVATE22.
Joe Elcano

KNPB Channel 5 Public B
roadcasting.

Joe Elcano

Las Vegas Science Festival
. Allison Brody, Director

of Programs, Exhibit IQ

Lemelson Education and Assistance Program
.

Caryn Swobe

Mendenhall Innovation Program, College of Engineering, UNLV.

Brendan O’Toole

MESA Nevada.
Adrienne
Goetz

Nevada Arts Council
. Maryjane Dorofachuk


Nevada Department of Education STEM Education Planning Group
.

Andre DeLeon

Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation
.
Frank Woodbeck, Director

Nevada Environmental Literacy Council
.
Alliso
n Brody and Jonathan Mueller

Nevada State Science Teachers Association
.

Camille Stegman, President

Nevada STEM Education Planning Group


Northern Nevada FIRST Lego League
.

Dee Freewert
, Regional Director

Northwest Nevada Regional Professional Development
Program (NWRPDP).

Dave Brancamp, Director

Office of Nevada Lt. Governor Brian Krolicki

Raggio Research Center for STEM Education
.
Jacque Ewing, Director

Sierra NV Journeys

Southern Nevada Regional Professional Development Program.
Bill Hanlon, Director

Spa
ce Science for Schools, Inc.

Dee Frewert
, Education and Development Director

Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum


Vegas PBS
.
Lee Solonche
, Dir., Educational Media Services

Western Nevada College
.
Carol Lucey
, President

Workforce Connections
.

Jaime Cruz
, Director of Green Economy Workforce Development







Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

26



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




Attachment
E
:
Technology and Innovation Roundtable Summary

Committee Chair,
Dr. Kim Vidoni, Educational Technology Coordinator, Nevada Department of Education


I.

Marketing our Successes Better

A.

Showcases

B.

Websites

C.

Local Media

II.

Connecting teachers with funders
-
more effort from grant officers

A.

Liaison from outside the district

III.


Increased, Sustained Professional Development in Technology

IV.

Sustained Funding to Facilitate Long
-
Term Planning

V.

Increased and Better Qua
lity of Support from Administrators

VI.

Increased Community Support

A.

Parental Involvement and support by showing student work

B.

Increased community support by putting labs out in the community for adult education,
student access, and access for all

C.

Create a space

to help teachers find what they need

D.

Festivals to pull in parents as well as the community and local politicians

E.

Teamwork with universities

F.

A center for math, science and engineering

G.

Students send the message
-
Let them tell the story with websites and You
Tube

H.

Industry goes to legislature

I.

Industry, Chamber of
Commerce Partners

J.

Student Ambassador Program

K.

Taking the lead should be school district PR staff, students, peers, Chambers of Commerce
(lobbying power), grant staff, local school boards, industry partn
ers






Note: Detailed transcription notes from each roundtable are available on our website at
http://www.nvstem.org/co
alition
-
events/nv
-
stem
-
education
-
2011
-
conference/nevada
-
stem
-
coalition
-
roundtable
-
transcripts/





Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

27



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




Attachment
F
: Ensuring Diversity in the STEM Student Pipeline

Roundtable Summary

Committee Co
-
chairs: Larry Mason, consultant and John Gardner, Special
Assistant to the President, DRI


This report addresses barriers and recommendations/strategies put forth in the Summit held May 2012 at the
South Point Resort. The report format speaks to the barriers and possible solutions for teachers, students,
parents

and the business world's diverse student population. The overview includes all aspects of diversity
include a low income populations, which represents a large portion of the minority community. The elements
that are addressed are not necessarily in the o
rder of their importance or impact but are all significant.


Abstract/reality

This report begins with the fact that STEM, for many students, teachers, and parents, is an abstract
concept. The recommendation is to address preparing students for careers
following strategy of the
unlimited validation of the careers that are based on one or more aspects of a solid STEM education.
The Science, Technology, Engineering and Math curriculum must be promoted to and by teachers,
parents, and the business world.
The abstract concept must be turned into a reality confirmation of the
value of STEM education for the future careers of both the majority and minority population for the
future growth of our state and nation.


Paradigm shift

The change we need to encourag
e most in education by teachers and administrators is students want
hands on programs that link learning to real
-
world conditions that apply to their lives and future careers.
This paradigm shift was voiced over and over by the majority of the participant
s, which included
teachers, students, and administrators attending the summit. The identification of barriers being
removed can be a great asset in the benefit for change for students, teachers, administrators and
industry. The business world can and shou
ld render the right guidance to the needs for future careers of
our students by visiting schools and forecasting future employment skills needs. The business world
offering internships for students, as well as visiting schools, and conducting continuous d
ialogue of their
current and future career requirements is of mutual benefit.


Conclusions

Curriculum is a repeated barrier due to lack of STEM curriculum. These curriculum shortfalls are
magnified by teachers not qualified in STEM disciplines, as well a
s the additional costs for integrating
interdisciplinary curriculum to the core subjects. Curriculum enhancement must also encompass career
courses for all aspects for future career opportunities. There must be a broader understanding of the
unlimited ca
reer choices that do exist for students who have excellent STEM academic credentials. A
key component for the growth of STEM curriculum at all levels K
-
16 is professional development.
Training in cultural diversity for teachers is also necessary. A key
element in this conversation is the
reference to benchmarks identified for Nevada's Superintendents, Administrators and Teachers. There
are outstanding schools within the state, as well as nationally, those schools were indicated in the
overall report as
institutes and profiles of excellence in both diversity and STEM education.


The conclusion of the diversity committee task force is that the recommendation/strategies for
improvement of STEM curriculum must have a dedicated focus for the underrepresented
population of
Nevada's students. The most essential recommended in the introduction/elevation of STEM curriculum
at the elementary level as a primary first step. The well
-
known fact this will sets the stage for
continuation into the higher grades and fut
ure STEM careers for Nevada's students. The importance of
STEM at all levels cannot be over stressed, but that early focus is essential. The incorporation of
diversity into the master plan for Nevada's STEM improvement and recommendations by the G2 must
have a strong advocacy to parallel the other recommendations put forth from the STEM Summit.


Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

28



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report





The assumption that Stem enhancement for some will become access for all is not necessarily true. The
evidence illustrated by the disproportionate access for hig
her STEM curriculum in affluent schools in
comparison to those in lower income districts, and validates the need for sincere focus on the diversity
components for Nevada's STEM curriculum and access moving forward.


Strategies

It is a recommendation that a
ll strategic STEM enhancement plans address the focus on diversity in their
initial proposal. This recommendation from the diversity committee strongly suggests that the diversity
focus cannot be a footnote to all other recommendations made by the Summit
participants. Therefore
it is recommended that there be a dedicated task force within the consortium of G2 ensuring that
diversity is addressed in all aspects of the strategic plan for STEM in the state of Nevada. This primary
recommendation if adopted w
ill ensure that underrepresented and
low
-
income

student populations are
incorporated into the advancement of STEM curriculum. The recommendation for the G2 strategic plan
moving forward adheres to the wording that all students be given equal access and liberty to STEM
education is vital both to the in
dividual student and the future workforce of the state of Nevada. The
critical crossroad for the state of Nevada's current and future work force cannot be improved without
improvement of its STEM education and access for the underrepresented populations.

This is the
pipeline for economic growth within the state, as well as the nation’s diverse next
-
generation labor
force population.



Note: Detailed transcription notes from each roundtable are available on our website at
http://www.nvstem.org/coalition
-
events/nv
-
stem
-
education
-
2011
-
conference/nevada
-
stem
-
coalition
-
roundtable
-
transcripts/





Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

29



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




Attachment
G
: STEM Standards and

Curriculum Roundtable Summary

Committee Chair: Tracy Gruber, K
-
6
Mathematics
Specialist, Nevada Department of Education

___________________________________________________________________________________________

Issues

Our roundtable focused on both stand
ards (what) and curriculum (how) for STEM education for K
-
12. Currently,
there are state standards for mathematics, science, and technology. Currently, there are no standards for
engineering in Nevada. Another issue our group discussed was related to ho
w these standards are taught.
Putting both of these together the roundtable group determined that there is an apparent disconnect between
skills and how they are being taught/mastered in K
-
12 education and what is required for career or post
-
secondary edu
cation. Lastly, the standards and curriculum roundtable addressed the issue of access to STEM
education for all students.


Challenges


Through our discussion about the above issues, many challenges were raised, including the amount of
instructional time for quality science and math instruction. There was some discussion about some elementary
school teachers not feeling very confident wit
h certain math and science concepts. This may result in less
engaging lessons in the classroom. It was also discussed that due to the focus on summative assessments, a
deep understanding of math and science may have been compromised over the past several
years. Assessments
may have resulted in more “drill and kill” instruction, resulting in short term retention of concepts and/or
procedures.


For secondary teachers, one of the challenges identifies was a lack of a deep understanding of content needed
t
o make both math and science more applicable to students. Instruction at the secondary level is many times
delivered through lecture. In general, the lack of making math and science application for students creates a
disjointed curriculum that does not
result in the necessary skills required for career and post
-
secondary
education.


There are several schools throughout Nevada who have implemented or are trying to implement STEM
education. These schools have high expectations and have made a commitment

to increase the amount of time
devoted to the STEM subject areas. Professional development and commitment from the school’s leadership
have been instrumental in this process. Many of these schools have partnerships with business and industry
that help m
ake sure that the pipeline to industry is connected to the skills taught in public K
-
12 education.

In regards to all students having access to STEM education, the roundtable discussion focused on making sure
that ALL students, including special education

students, English language learners, as well as gifted and talented
students, should have exposure and to STEM education. This discussion focused on resources, professional
development, and differentiated instruction. By having ALL students learn STEM d
isciplines, the gap among
different subpopulations may begin to close in Nevada schools.



Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

30



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




Possible Solutions


Communication seems to be the first step in solving the issues above. Higher education faculty, business, and
industry should work with K
-
12 ed
ucation in order to improve the pipeline of K
-
12 education to career or
college. By having all of the stakeholders at the table, it will help create an effective pipeline where what is
being taught meets the expectations of what is required for college an
d career.
Things that would foster this
more effective pipeline are changes in teacher re
-
certification where the process is more STEM
-
oriented
, career
matrixes
where students will know the prerequisites of their desired profession(s) and the development
of
statewide curriculum framework focused on STEM instruction.


Professional development for educators is also a key to solving this problem. The desire was to have a “less
disjointed” professional development focus and provide teachers with the conten
t knowledge and pedagogy
skills needed to effectively teach math and science. By doing this engagement and mastery of skills will increase
and increase confidence, for both students and teachers in the STEM disciplines. By making sure that ALL
students a
re taught these skills, the achievement gap may close and those who may have not had the
opportunity before may now contribute in ways unimaginable. Professional development should also provide
administrators with an understanding of the instructional mod
el which would aid administrators in the
evaluation process.


Having STEM education examples, a “how
-
to” guide, and a STEM network may help solve some of the above
issues. By having others problem solve and find solutions in the area of STEM education,
may increase good
teaching practices. Communication, collaboration, and critical thinking will help Nevada, as a whole, improve on
how we teach Nevada’s students the skills and content necessary so that they will be able to be college and
career ready. T
his is necessary for the future of Nevada.


Note: Detailed transcription notes from each roundtable are available on our website at
http://www.nvstem.org/coalition
-
events/nv
-
stem
-
education
-
2011
-
conference/nevada
-
stem
-
coalition
-
roundtable
-
transcripts/





Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

31



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report





Attachment
H
: Workforce Readiness Roundtable Summary

Committee Chair:

Ryan Costella
, Director of Strategic Initiatives, Click Bond, Inc.;
Member of Strategic Planning
Committee
, Dream

It Do It Nevada


The roundtable conversations for workforce readiness were quite informative. Our conversations focused on
two main topics, resources and
communication. There was broad agreement that there are quite a few
resources in the state that


if tied together


could significantly improve industry’s engagement with the
education system at all levels, especially with the students, to communicate wh
at career opportunities are
available and what programs one should take advantage of to position him/herself to take advantage of them


whether as an elementary school student or high school senior.


Communication

The list below captures organizations t
hat are already working to improve communications about career
opportunities. They can reach wide audiences and if utilized effectively, wouldn’t place a cost burden on the
education system. This list includes, but is not limited to:



Dream It Do It Neva
da



Gathering Genius



Civic groups



The Governor’s Office of Economic Development and respective economic development agencies



Industry associations



The Nevada Department of Employment, Training & Rehabilitation



Chambers of commerce



Student associations like
FBLA, SkillsUSA, etc.



Community and non
-
profit partners

Taking the conversation one more level deep, the participants identified specific examples of effective
communication regarding career readiness, including:



Industry
-
led teacher workshops that the
mining industry and NV E
nergy already currently sponsor




Existing efforts related to factory tours, industry support financially and in kind to educational programs,
and participation in career days, science fairs, robotics competitions, etc.



Dream It Do
It Nevada has built a statewide asset map of all programs in K
-
12, higher education,
industry, and the non
-
profit sector that promote STEM education, career development, career &
technical education, and
industry
-
recognized credentials

The participants als
o identified specific challenges that hinder effective communication, including:



Data showcasing the impact of alternative learning on STEM education and career readiness, part
icularly


with respect to museums




Quality marketing by business/industry



Ineffective communication with primary education students



“Intimidation factor” (the words “degree” or “credential” can be intimidating, as can stepping onto a



college campus for certain families. Communication needs to be cognizant of this)



Lack

of value of high school diploma



Kids only hear “college ready” and never hear “career ready”



Lack of consistency statewide in messaging



We are reactive



We need better statewide communication of job opportunities



Feedback to students, schools, and teachers

on deficiencies isn’t given specifically, so they can never be



remedied. The focus on exit exams is more like an “autopsy” than anything else.



We don’t have any data describing what our kids want to be when they grow up



“Local control” and provin
cialism, especially in the education system



Bad education statistics



Teachers have limited access to employers


Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

32



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report






No single point of contact on all sides


we need a bridge



Legislation is needed regarding teacher credentials and making it easier for industry

experts to get in the


classroom
, even if on an adjunct basis.



No “political will”



Misperceptions of industry in education (industry problem)


Resources

The groups also discussed existing resources that are being dedicated to enhancing STEM and career readiness
across our state, including:



Existing certificates/industry credential programs



Industry partners (mock interviews, mentorships, career fairs, tou
rs, existing curriculum and established


career

pathways)



We have a skilled workforce (they are working)



Apprenticeship programs (particularly with organized labor)



CTE programs/career academies (especially in Clark and Washoe counties)



Washoe: AACT (medi
cal, arts, veterinarian); tech and college credit programs; signature academies



Industry willingness to engage



Advisory committees in education both at state and local level



National partnerships (the Manufacturing Institute, the Lumina Foundation for Educ
ation, etc.)



Career data bases (NCIS and NAV101)



Strong technical/science
-
based career opportunities in manufacturing, health care, mining, energy, etc.



Businesses want to hire



We do have highly qualified teachers



We have a skilled retired workforce



Found
ations and scholarships



Industry asset donation



Upward bound programs



Job s for America’s Grads



Project Lead the Way



FIRST Robotics



Industry
-
developed curriculum (Right Skills Now, for example, at TMCC and WNC)



Industry support for educational programs (f
actory tours, supply of parts, financial contributions and


sponsorships
, career day participation, etc.)



ACT Work Keys infrastructure in workforce system, providing the National Career Readiness Certificate



Lego league



Self
-
assessment testing leading to
careers

The group also identified barriers that prevent resources from being properly allocated or utilized to the fullest
extent:



Teaching to the test



Over
-
reliance on volunteers vs. proper staffing



Transportation of students/costs/liabilities, etc.



No “
proof” of skilled workers or academic attainment (value of high school diploma isn’t



Per pupil funding very low



Bureaucratic barriers and red tape, especially for business engagement (excuse is “risk management”)



Public sector “ownership” of information t
hat should be shared


provincialism



Misperception of careers vs. jobs



Lack of career awareness among teachers, parents, counselors, and the community at large



Cutting of vocational/technical education programs



Equal access to programs



Inconsistent career
advising personnel



Inconsistency of resources/programs from school to school and district to district


Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

33



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report






Teacher comfort with technical education material/practices



Remediation realities



Educators aren’t sure “how” to engage with employers


Recommendations

Al
l

of the barriers identified in the workforce readiness roundtables can be addressed by specific pieces of the
Dream It Do
I
t

NV plan. Dream It Do It Nevada is a 501c3 organization dedicated to creating for the entire state,
a highly skilled workforce by
aligning academic “for credit” programs with nationally portable, industry
-
recognized credentials valued by employers.


Dream It Do It Nevada’s statewide strategy will have the following benefits:



Increase employment and reduce political pressure to
alter the tax system



Increase high school graduation rates and decrease drop
-
out rates (reducing dependency, gang violence,
crime rates, etc.)




Increase higher education completion rates, which will bolster funding



Provide tangible proof of a skilled workf
orce to further efforts to diversify Nevada’s economy and att
ract
new employers to the state




Ensure existing employers have the workforce they need (especially with Baby Boomer retirements)
now and in the future


PROBLEM #1: We have the highest unemployme
nt rate in the nation at 12.3%.

Dream It Do It Nevada will increase employment and reduce political pressure to alter the tax system by:



Working with DETR to expand ACT “Work Keys” infrastructure in the community colleges and job
connect centers statewid
e to screen unemployed and underemployed people on reading, writing, math,
and problem
-
solving

skills




Assisting DETR’s efforts connecting those who successfully receive the “National Career Readiness
Certificate” to employers

looking for skilled workers




Assisting DETR’s efforts to ensure that those who are deficient in reading, writing, math, and/or
problem
-
solving are exposed to the “Key Train 101” online curriculum so they can become profic
ient
and get connected to a job



PROBLEM #2: Nevada has a chal
lenged K
-
12 system with the highest dropout rates and lowest graduation
rates in the country.

Dream It Do It Nevada will increase high school graduation rates and decrease dropout rates by:



Working with superintendents around the state to align high schoo
l infrastructure, programs, and
curricula to career pathways and higher education programs that result in national credentials valued
industry and consistent
with economic development needs




Communicating effectively to parents, teachers, counselors, and s
tudents what local assets are available
to pursue a career path in our state. This will include social media tools; traditional advertising and
marketing; employer engagement through career fairs, factory tours, internships, science fairs, etc.; and
resou
rc
es to bolster career counseling


PROBLEM #3: Higher education spends 25% of resources on remediation and struggles with completion rates,
which negatively impacts their funding.

Dream It Do It Nevada will decrease the remediation burden on higher educati
on and increase completion rates
by:



Working with community college presidents and the NV System of Higher Education to align academic
“for credit” programs with nationally portable, industry
-
recognized
credentials valued by employers




Partnering with community colleges to bolster applications for federal funding through the Workforce
Investment Act, Department of Labor, the National Science Foundation, etc.


Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

34



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report






Working with the Nevada Department of Education to embrace a definition of “col
lege and career
ready” that incorporates the proficiencies measured by the National Career Readiness Certificate



Working with the NV Department of Employment, Training, & Rehabilitation to identify and invest in the
infrastructure necessary to remediate de
ficiencies in our unemployed and underemployed population
with online tools, rather than pass the burden onto higher education a
nd/or employers


PROBLEM #4: Employers have open jobs and can’t find skilled workers, even with record unemployment.

Dream It Do

It Nevada will ensure existing employers have the workforce they need (especially with Baby
Boomer retirements) now and in the future by:



Clarifying specific needs of employers (data shows largest flaws are in basic reading, writing, math, and
problem sol
ving abilities)



Aligning those needs with for
-
credit academic programs that result in nationally portable, industry
recognized credentials



Getting commitment from employers to require these cred
entials in their hiring process


PROBLEM #5: Diversifying Nev
ada’s economy away from gaming/tourism and attracting new employers is
tough without proof of a skilled workforce.

Dream It Do It Nevada will
provide tangible proof of a skilled workforce to further efforts to diversify Nevada’s
economy and attract new emp
loyers to the state by:



Encouraging all employers, recruiters, and staffing agencies to require a National Career Readiness
Certificate “Plus” from all prospective employees to verify they are proficient in reading, writing, math,
and problem
-
solving and h
ave the soft skills to show up on time, work well in tea
ms, and communicate
effectively




Encouraging all employers, in addition to the NCRC, to require nationally portable, industry
-
recognized
credentials associated with their sector. This demand by the p
rivate sector, paired with the granting of
certifications by higher education institutions, will serve as PROOF of a skilled workforce
for existing and
future needs


Note: Detailed transcription notes from each roundtable are available on our website at
http://www.nvstem.org/coalition
-
events/nv
-
stem
-
education
-
2011
-
conference/nevada
-
stem
-
coalition
-
roundtable
-
transcripts/





Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

35



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




A
ttachment
I
: Pipeline to Higher Education Roundtable

Summary

Chair: Dr. Paul Buck, Associate Professor of Archaeology, College of Southern Nevada, and


Research Professor, DRI


Are the recommendations of the Brookings Institution report “Unify,
Regionalize, Diversify; an economic
develop
ment agenda for Nevada” a good

“driver” for STEM education reform in Nevada?



We need an a
rticulation plan

for the recommendations



Nevada needs a communications plan K
-
20



Educators need an
implementation

plan and
support for standards in STEM fields



We have a current l
ack of exposure to STEM in primary grades;
STEM must be sustained K
-
8 and
beyond;
students need explore to teaching practices that emphasize
Inquiry

and

engagement



STEM advisement

is

needed

for our
students



Nevada n
eed competency
-

based promotion
,

not grade level promotion



An i
ntegrated approach is needed

for teaching STEM subjects



Additional f
unding

is

needed for sustained
professional development among various partners



More focus on math

smaller c
lass sizes in grades 7
-
12
are essential



More in depth on core topics



Need better degree alignment using applied information systems



Refocus

teaching practices

to learning in context



Integrate subjects



Need to change assessment
s

to match

new ways of teachin
g



Examine and provide recommendations to change the anti
-
math focus in our society. We m
ust link
curriculum clearly to career paths in STEM



Develop STEM
teaching
resources for technology kids already use (PB note: YouTube vides or video clips
of scientists
at work)


Wh
y do a decreasing proportion of

Nevada students select STEM majors, certificates or emphases in college?



Students n
eed STEM academic advisors in scho
ols



More
student
exposure
to the

real world is essential

we
need STEM activities in elementary schools



More technical academi
c language development for underrepresented

students
.



Decrease the gap between high school and

post secondary by articulating p
rograms betweens schools



Need dual credit programs



We do not have adequate professional development for STEM pedagogy and curriculum



Everybody
, from
the superintendent

on down, including the legislature,

must be involved
. S
top top
-

down suppressing of STEM



Higher ed
ucation

needs to

recruit more aggressively in Nevada



Assessments currently focus away from science



Legislature must provide funding for fundamental change in STEM
education for

materials
.

Start STEM
earlier

, in
pre
-
K



U
se more h
ands
on

inquiry
-

based activities



Develop continuity
among

all levels



Develop more
community partnerships



Create more formal expectations for all these recommendations


Why are so few students well prepared to succeed in STEM fields in college?



High
er

level of

teacher
professional development is needed




We lack a
seamless
STEM
education

K
-
20



Students need a much
earlier introduction to
STEM career pathways



Students lack
fundamentals

needed to succeed in STEM fields


Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

36



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




Do a lower percentage of unde
rrepresented

students

complete college degrees or certificates

in

STEM fields?
If so why, and what should be done about it?



Bring role models into the schools

from industry emphasis on exposure of students to relevant role
models in STEM
, and start it earl
y



Mobile STEM lab for rural areas



Parental outreach/education



Mentors
are needed



Link college students to after school STEM programs at K
-
12 schools



Feature a local pool of diverse engineers, scientists, engineers through video, web, broadening
classroom
access/technology



Change the culture
-

develop cultural attitudes that math is

cool



Do a STEM PR blitz statewide



Increase communication with parents.



Schools

must be

more open to community



Provide w
ebsites for counselors, parents, students to promote the c
areer paths of STEM



Support Gathering Genius Initiative


Which specific STEM disciplinary fields (
i.e., specific

AA &

BS

majors) should our students be well trained in?
What college certificate and/or degree programs should be created or expanded to suppor
t the Brookings
STEM focal areas?

a.

Industry needs to continue and expand funding/supporting academic programs directly


How should teacher preparation programs be changed to support the STEM focus areas of Brookings
Institution re
port?



Eliminate out of fie
ld teaching



Add STEM specialists; options for alterative teacher endorsement



Need more mentorships/partnerships



Bring
a
STEM st
r
and into each
teacher pre
-
service
pedagogy/methods course




Coursework in STEM content and STEM integration=interdisciplinary understanding



More math content for pre
-
service teacher education



College board of mathematical sciences



Much earlier clinical experiences in STEM classrooms are essential


What kind of college internship or partnership programs would be useful to improve
students’

success in
college STEM
field and eventual

employment
?



Need to connect private sector expertise to teacher sites schools, and regions



Need many more internship opp
ortunities



Need more effective communication



Develop m
odular themes

STEM integrated to STEM initiatives or conceptual themes across classes
with consultant input


What can non
-
profits like Gathering Genius, Inc and others do to better prepare K
-
12 student
s to succeed in
STEM disciplines in college?





A
sset mapping is needed



B
etter communication (between stakeholders/ is needed
-

a coalition building perhaps through a
website

sharing
opportunities/pathways


What kinds of in
-
service teacher professional devel
opment are needed to improve success of entering college
students in STEM fields?



I
n

service professional development

must better integrate application and content



Establish and implement a mentorship program accessible to all K
-
12 teachers


Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

37



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report






Use Skype and

other technologies



Teachers must be
come

resources to collaborate more



Partner with industry professionals to expand understanding

of


the
application
s of

STEM

curriculum

to



the real world



STEM training at each school
--

bring experts to teachers

(site
-
based teacher training)



“S
ummer” professional development as part of an 11 month contract
--

2 months to

learn
,

not teach



Re
structure school day to allow professional development and collaboration

each day



Need better teacher/counselor internship
exposure to career paths



Need K
-
16 data set to track student paths

through to job attainment

(learn what works)
, tied to high
school assessment



Need counselor training in college (pre
-
service training) for STEM expectations; then track expectations;
need s
pecialty academic advisors for STEM



Change mindset of sch
ool culture

of just meeting minimum to graduate


Additional
Comments



If the focus of testing changes
and teachers are judged on how well the students succeed in science (
as

they are for English
,

mat
h
,

and
reading)

then these
students and

teachers will be

judged “successful.”
However, t
esting takes away the incentives to “teach’ kids other that just for the test. We want
accountability but a different kind

“STEM accountability.”



Many teachers would l
ike to integrate scientific methods and inquiry activities much better into
teaching

math with English, etc.

They need more support from administrators to do this.



There aren’t
as
many higher paying careers (in Nevada) in sciences
,

math
, and

engineerin
g
, while there
are good paying casino and hospitality
jobs



Use more project based learning

but the “project” should be to produce a skilled and an successful
student through partnership
among

university, industry and K
-
12 schools

the “project’ is a su
ccessful
student in the real world



STEM training for counselors: of specific individuals who have STEM background to advise students,
starting in m
iddle school about STEM careers



Need minority role models who have done well in STEM

bring them to schools,
show what they have
to bring. Make videos of successful scientists? Bring scientist to schools?



Teachers complain that assessment is strangling them

the assessments system doesn’t measure the
right things. We want the teachers to go to project based lear
ning

but the

current

assessment system
has nothing to

do with project based learning



All teachers need more
time out of the classroom for professional development (PD)

summer salary,
restructured professional development

days

currently
professional develo
pment days

a
re so broad
they are useless. We n
eed to expand and focus PD activities on interested groups focused on a
discipline from multiple grade levels

get middle school science teachers together with HS teachers and

elementary teachers of science



Need
advanced mentoring programs of master teachers wit
h new teachers, especially t
hose with
inquiry
skills for the next generation of teachers



Provide e
arlier
, more extensive c
linical practicums and more time i
n the classroom much earlier for pre
-
servic
e teachers



Need
a mobile

STEM lab to take to the rural districts

with qualified staff scientist etc. like the Movable
Museum in AMNH



Need universal kindergarten
-

students will get a major head start



We need “idols” or heroes in STEM as role models



Linking

visiting grad
uate

student or STEM graduate student to go to school after school programs



P
rogram

based on gifted and talented practices

focused on minority student
s in the classroom

maybe
using u
ndergrad
s



Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

38



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




Note: Detailed transcription notes from each roundtable are available on our website at
http://www.nvstem.org/coalition
-
e
vents/nv
-
stem
-
education
-
2011
-
conference/nevada
-
stem
-
coalition
-
roundtable
-
transcripts/





Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

39



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




Attachment
J
:
Informal Science Education (ISE) Roundtable Summary

Committee Chair:

Allison Brody, Program Manager, Exhibit IQ


QUESTION 1: how does ISE impact formal
education in Nevada?



Motivation, interest



Learner has ownership of education experience



Safe learning environment; more inclusive; don’t worry about being right or wrong



Application of content knowledge



Demonstrated value/results



Relevance; it grounds educ
ation in reality



Exposure/gateway to careers; to industry



Help to validate the work that formal educators are doing; this is why it is important to learn this and
this



Provide the “prior knowledge” and experiences to set the stage for the formal lesson



Pro
vide a common starting point for students


don’t make assumptions about what experiences
learners have had


QUESTION 2: creating ISE/Formal Education partnerships to better serve Nevada’s students



Alignment to standards, core curriculum; timing


ISE
needs to align to what is being ta
ught when it is
being taught

use the ISE teaching framework



Easier access to ISE opportunities



Centralized on
-
line platform that includes all ISE resources



Administrative support and buy
-
in; buy
-
in can’t be isolated among
one or two teachers



Improve c
ommunication



Create a c
entralized

data
-
base of resources and strategy to
disseminate



developed through Nevada
Department
of Education.
Take advantage of locations where teachers are already going




ISE needs access to market
ing and research tools



formal
education

needs to clearly communicate needs and ISE needs to market to those needs



Support f
amily growth and commitment to life
-
long learning


QUESTION 3: what is the role of ISE in economic development in the State of Nevada



creating community


ISE has a role in creating a community that is fun to be in, that is enriching, that is
attractive to industry, that provides rich learning experiences



Driving

interest and motivation to career paths within NV industries. A recruitme
nt tool for industry.



be part of creating a community that people want to be part of; create value for industry and
community



ISE drives visitors and tourism through competitions, events



Embrace innovation in industry; don’t discount traditional industry a
s well as new, growth



ISE is the link between industry and formal education. Create curricula to support these connections



Marketing
--

ISE needs access to marketing and research tools


Recommendations


Nevada Department of Education



Create a culture of
un
derstanding and support for informal science education ( ISE)





A
dvocate for ISE



Streamline process to make it easy to access opportunities



Provide data and stories to validate connection to ISE



Formal e
ducation needs greater freedom to access
opportunities and ISE needs access to information,
test scores (to document success, use to improve practice)



Line
-
item funding for ISE opportunities


Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

40



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report





Formal and Informal Educators



Create a centralized database of ISE resources



Effective marketing and dis
semination


Economic Development Agencies



Speak to the value of ISE and its role in Education and support this with their activities.



ISE has a role in creating commu
nity and connecting to industry



D
rive interest and motivation to care
er paths within NV i
ndustries, which is a
recruitment tool for
ind
ustry



Leverage the fact that
ISE drives visitors an
d tourism through competitions and
events



ISE is the link between
industry and formal education
--
c
reate curricula to support these connections


Informal Scienc
e Educators



Prov
ide rigorous ISE opportunities



Be accountable to high standards




Align practices

with

Nevada frameworks and curricula



Transition from being a provider to being a partner




Note: Detailed transcription notes from each roundtable are available on our website at
http://www.nvstem.org/coalition
-
e
vents/nv
-
stem
-
education
-
2011
-
conference/nevada
-
stem
-
coalition
-
roundtable
-
transcripts/





Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

41



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




Attachment

K
: Teacher Education and Professional Development

Roundtable
Summary

Committee Chair:
Dr. Teruni Lamberg, Assistant Professor,
College of

Education, UNR


The following model represents the ideas generated by the STEM summit on March 2012.

The ideal professional development network is a nested model where the layers build on each other.

A major theme that emerged is that there are material, human resources,

knowledge, and professional
development within the state.

There are two challenges: the first is a lack of coordination and coherence in professional development for
teachers. Professional development does not necessarily build on previous training to i
ncrease teacher
knowledge and skills. For examp
le, teachers may attend training sessions and workshops but the workshops
may
not be connected to each other. The second challenge is that a lack of communication around the state has led
to lack of access, kn
owledge and resources The roundtable committee and participants proposed a professional
development model that would become part of a Nevada STEM Network. An ideal professional development
network is a nested model that builds capacity of knowledge and
resources that are layered and
interdependent.In other words, what connects the ideal professional development network is COHERENCE AND
CONSISTENCY that is sustainable over time. This means there needs to be a larger vision and smaller goals with
a focus

on how these projects fit with the larger vision. There needs to be opportunities for people to meet and
interact. The challenges are resources, time and how to do this efficiently so it does not waste time and
resources.

In order to achieve a consistent

professional development model that increases teacher and student
performace,, we need statewide COMMUNICATION and a CLEARLY ARTICULATED VISION
.

What is also needed
is the freedom for teachers and schools to adapt professional development to fit their local needs. Not
everyone is or will be at the same place in professional skills. However, if everyone is working towards a
coherent vision of
professional development, then as a state we are working towards a common purpose. What
should not happen is that the PD gets so prescriptive and cannot be adapted to school and teacher needs. There
needs to be flexiblity to adapt the PD to different setti
ngs.



STEM NETWORK DESIGN FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT



We need a clearly articulated vision, roles, and communication within

and among the circles.

We also need to
coordinate needs by listening to teachers and making sure that they receive support in using research
-
based
practices to teach the standards at all levels

STUDENT Sphere

The focus at the student level should be on supporting
student learn
ing

of STEM content as articulated in the
draft STEM Foundational Principles, Common Core math
and reading

standards and the upcoming New
Framework Science Standards. These principles and standards articulate what a student should know and what
he should

be able to do. How to support
all
students to learn must be considered, as outlined in
the National
Research Council publication

How People Learn
.

SCHOOL Sphere

Principals need to be
instructional leaders

and support teachers to teach STEM standards. Pri
ncipals should
provide opportunities for (1) consistent, ongoing, relevant professional development, (2) opportunities for
teachers to collaborate and network, and (3) access to more knowledge and resources.

TEACHER Sphere

The teacher needs coherent, susta
inable, relevant professional development. Summit participants point out
that that job
-
embeded professional development is very helpful. Teachers can meet in
professional learning

communities (PLC’s)*
. The teachers who attend courses
and professional
should

share their knowledge with
their peers. We need to develop

talented teacher leaders. The regional professional development programs
can capitalize on teacher leaders to spread knowledge.

DISTRICT

HIGHER
EDUCATION

DISTRICT RPDP

SCHOOL
-

Teacher Principal

STUDENT

Goal Support Stem
Learning


Gathering Genius, Inc. PO Box 9144, Reno, NV 89507 775
-
225
-
4411
www.nvstem.org

42



Appendix to
2012 Nevada Statewide Inaugural STEM Summit

Report




Districts have the responsibility to develop teach
er leaders and provide implementation specialists.Teacher
leaders and principals communicate with district leaders about school needs. Districts should also provide
professional develoment

Regional Professional Development Programs (RPDP’s)

Nevada’s three

regional support organizations should continue to rovide opportunities forlong term, sustain
able
p
rofessional development.
RPDP’s should

p
rovide teacher leaders and school level support.

Within each of these layers are also different schools and entities
that currently provide resources and
professional development. Currently the majority are not linked to provide professional development. and
tend to work in isolation.
How can a system be developed that can address the communication piece
?
Geography i
s a challenge. Information and resources exists, but it is not always accessible when needed. Many
groups are re
-
inventing the wheel. How about sharing knowledge and building capacity as a state?



* http://www.allthingsplc.info/pdf/articles/DuFourWhatIs
AProfessionalLearningCommunity.pdf



Note: Detailed transcription notes from each roundtable are available on our website at
http://www.nvstem.org/coalition
-
events/nv
-
stem
-
education
-
2011
-
conference/nevada
-
stem
-
coalition
-
roundtable
-
transcripts/