Exploring the New Schoolhouse Week 2x

groanaberrantInternet and Web Development

Feb 2, 2013 (4 years and 5 months ago)

155 views

Running Head:
EXPLORING THE NEW SCHOOLHOUSE

1





Exploring the New Schoolhouse:

Bringing Together Best Practices and 21
st

Century Tools

Julia Wilson

Lamar University






EXPLORING THE NEW SCHOOLHOUSE


2


Exploring the New Schoolhouse: Bringing Together Best
Practices and 21
st

Century Tools

In 2002, I enrolled in a master’s program for a degree in American history. Two weeks
later, I sat in my doctor’s office and received the wonderful news that I was expecting my first
child.
I set aside one dream for anoth
er, and for eight years I committed myself to my family
and my teaching career. Yet even in these roles the desire to learn and grow flourished, and so it
was with no small excitement that I enrolled in my first course in another master’s program: one
ver
y different from my first attempt. Over the course of the following months I found many
long
-
held beliefs regarding teaching and learning fall, only to have new ideas and concepts take
their place with more support than ever before. I developed a vast ar
ray of skills, I built
communities of practice, and I taught myself and my campus how technology was not ‘just one
more thing’, but the keystone on which a constructivist classroom could be built. It is with much
pride that I share with you the knowledge
and the wisdom gained during my time with Lamar
University Academic Partnerships.

Position Goal

Many months ago, a fellow student asked me to look outside my own world view:
s
he
reminded me that, as

a
mazing and as relevant as new technology can

undoubtedly be

to teaching
and learning, some teachers remain
overwhelmed
by relentless waves of the new
.

My goal at the
time was
to work with my mentor and my
campus administration

to build a framework of
authenti
c learning experiences and
collaboration

amon
g the staff; in doing
so
, I wanted all of my
colleagues to

develop the confidence

and skill to use these vast resources to support success for
all students
.


I find in these final weeks of transition from learner to learner
-
leader that my
mission has

not changed.
I consider myself fearless with technology, and as such I
am driven to
show
how initiative and fortitude can empower teachers to achieve
what were
previously
EXPLORING THE NEW SCHOOLHOUSE


3


considered unattainable goals. I want educators to overcome the
ir apprehensions
:
the fear that
the technology will fail them during instruction, the fear that a lack of mastery will demonstrate
weakness to students, the fear that emerging technology skills will supersede instructional
priorities.
This does not happen in one fell swoop;

rather, through a vital framework of ongoing
professional development and support
(Guskey, 1998, p. 40)
.

My instincts as
both teacher and leader

allow me to effectively c
ollaborate with grade
-
level teams and
instructional teams

to find authentic ways to incorporate technology into best
practices. I have a hands
-
on approach to professional development, and this draws me to an
environment of professional learning communities, where my primary goal as leader is
to
facilitate the communication and parallel accountability that comes from a group of like
-
minded
peers.

Essentially, this idea of professionals learning through interactions in their pursuit of
common goals

(Solomon & Sch
rum, 2007, p. 103)

mirrors the concept of student
-
centered
learning
(Edutopia Staff, 2008)
.

As an instructional leader, I hope to bring the very best of today
together with the cutting edge innovations of tomorrow to supp
ort best teaching practices and
improved student achievement.

Leadership Goal

I want to serve
as a district instructional technology

coordinator because I see enormous

opportunity to introduce an
d develop
technology
as a vital component of ensuring

student
success. This goal might follow a variety of career paths, depending on the district environment.
In my home district, this journey has changed quite recently with the advent of challenging
economic realities. In the past, this career would hav
e begun with

tenure as the campus
technology content interventionist (TCI); however, this position has bee
n eliminated by the
district. This change of circumstance does not obstruct my ultimate goals: in the wake of recent
EXPLORING THE NEW SCHOOLHOUSE


4


changes two other opportunitie
s have emerged that would more actively utilize the educational
administrative components of my coursework.
I could now

begin my advancement by securing a
position as a technology facilitator, responsible for working with a set of campuses on their
instru
ctional technology needs
; or, I could advance in a more administrative capacity as an
instructional specialist, working directly with teams and professional learning communities to
implement best practices and analyze various data sources to improve instru
ction. Either
positio
n would afford me a more robust
experience with the trends of a variety of campuses, and
potentially provide more experience with the needs of a s
econdary campus. I could
segue

that
framewor
k of experience and knowledge into the role

of

district
-
wide instructional technology
coordinator, tasked with providing appropriate knowledge, resources, and support to all teachers
within the district as they work to utilize technology as a vital component of best teaching
practices.

A Few Steps
Forward: A Vision of the Technology
-
Rich Classroom of the Future

The well
-
equipped classroom today rests on the verge of metamorphosis. After long
decades of aching, hesitant steps into the world of technology integration, in the last five years
American

education has seen its first steps into the dawn of a wholly new experience with
classroom computing. Classrooms are now fully connected to the larger world
(Wells & Lewis,
2006, p. 4)

and have begun to embrace how technology brings the ideal of constructivism to life
(Chung, 2004, p. 278)
. If one walks this path of innovation into the future, these seeds of
connection and creation have been brought

to bear in the form of
electronic books, or ebooks,

and collaborative learning environments that are supported through mobile technologies and
game
-
based learning alternatives.
(Johnson, Smith, Willis, Levine, & Haywood, 201
1, p. 8)

These trends merge to create a nexus for the new face of student
-
centered learning. Take a few
EXPLORING THE NEW SCHOOLHOUSE


5


more steps down the path, and the traveler finds even more dramatic changes to the face of the
classroom stemming from the emergence of augmented

reality applications: a few steps farther
and the stunning applications resulting from flexible displays come into view. Every journey
has a place of origin, and this path begins with the classroom of today.


A walk through a typical suburban classroom

like my own

shows the recent explosion of
interactive and collaborative technologies at work. The standards for a technologically
-
integrated classroom are all in evidence: a ceiling
-
mounted projector with networked surround
sound, an HD and recordable d
ocument camera on the teacher station, an interactive whiteboard
mounted to the wall equipped with a remote student response system, and, underlying it all, a
robust broadband Internet connection for both the teacher station and the five student computers
available.
(Moore, 2006, p. 8)

Students are utilizing a class wiki to collaborate and share
documents, and teacher email is available for submitting assignments. Yet, for all of these
benefits, the classroom of the pre
sent has some significant deficits resolved in the classroom of
the future. While the wikis and whiteboards of today’s classroom are a quantum leap forward in
document sharing and student collaboration, there still remains much room for growth.

In 2016,

this same classroom will offer real
-
time collaboration in the form of online
collaboration tools such as the Google Apps suite, where students can work either
asynchronously or in tandem on assignments or presentations, collaborate with peers and the
inst
ructor on the shared calendar, and even create a shared site to both compile data and share
with a global learning community.
(Center for Teaching and Learning, n.d.)

In order to further
enhance students’ ability to collaborate in real
-
time, all students will be issued a personal mobile
computing device, such as an Apple iPad.
Tablet computers such as the iPad will propel
classrooms into a new paradigm, largely repla
cing the need for student laptops or classroom
EXPLORING THE NEW SCHOOLHOUSE


6


desktops
(Elmer
-
DeWitt, 2011)
.
The issuance of
such devices

directly addresses the national
goal of 24/7 accessibility and connectivity for students.
(Office of Educational Technology,
2010, p. 54)

Students will have access to collaboration tools in the classroom in conjunction
with the access afforded the teacher via the interactive whiteboard. The result: full classroom
participation in real
-
time, with full documentation of the developmental processes that moved
the class effort towards its final result. This documentation and availability of adjustment is a
core value of the HEB ISD, as is the expectation that teachers constantly access op
portunities
and resources to develop best teaching practices.
(Forester, Sarpalius, & Barsallo, 2009)

In this
future classroom, teachers will be using meta
-
hubs, such as Verizon’s Thinkfinity, to find
specific activities to al
ign to their lesson objectives: for example, a fifth grade science teacher
like me
will enter the content search for particular objectives, such as “
Identify and compare the
physical characterist
ics of the Sun, Earth, and Moon”
(Texas State Board of
Education, 2009
,
§112.16.
b.8
)

to find a whole network of interactive activities and suggestions for creating lessons
based on those activities.
(Verizon Foundation, n.d.)

Students will then access these activities in
collabora
tion from home to share background knowledge and develop so
lutions with divergent
thinking

(Royal Society of the Arts, 2010)
.

Students will walk into the classroom the following
day and complete a formative assessment that al
lows different learners to respond utilizing their
collaborative solutions.
Students’ own mobile devices will be configured as student response
tools, eliminating the need for a separate student response system
(Johnson,
Smith, Willis,
Levine, & Haywood, 2011, p. 13)
.
In this classroom of the future
,

instructional design, lesson
delivery,
collaborative problem
-
solving,
and student assessment

will form a cohesive action plan
for student success.

EXPLORING THE NEW SCHOOLHOUSE


7


The introduction of a
1:1 initiative for mobile computing devices brings into sharper
focus opportunities for gaming and augmented reality applications to play a significant role in
student learning. Here on the path into the future, students have long
-
passed the skill and dri
ll
games of today’s classrooms: instead, students are stretching and melding their mathematical,
scientific, and problem
-
solving knowledge as they address scenarios with their peers in class and
around the world within a massive multiplayer online game (M
MOG) such as Lure of the
Labyrinth, a game that focuses on the application of higher order thinking skills to utilize
mathematical knowledge.
(Learning Games to Go project, n.d.)

Students in this science class of
the future

will participate in an MMOG that places students in various roles on a spaceship
exploring the solar system. This game could allow for teacher input of possible scenarios and
monitoring of student collaboration and problem solving through the web. A sum
mative
assessment on sun, earth, moon relationships will include a virtual tour of the solar system via
augmented reality such as Apple’s application StarWalk, where a student’s movements can be
monitored to determine their understanding of rotations and r
evolutions of celestial objects,
allowing ELL learners or emergent readers to display knowledge through kinesthetic means.
(Echevarria, Vogt, & Short, 2007, p. 123)

Students can then share their experiences with other
campuses through the virtual world of Second Life.
(Kissko, 2010)

Not only can the students of
this classroom bring the world into their classroom, they can step out of t
heir classroom and out
into the virtual world.


Like a self
-
fulfilling prophecy, the classroom nestled on this pathway does not exist until
educators take those steps toward the future. The obstacles are many: financial resources,
security concerns, and
the resistance of the teaching community to embrace such a sea
change in
teaching and learning

(Johnson, Smith, Willis, Levine, & Haywood, 2011, pp. 3
-
4)
.
These same
EXPLORING THE NEW SCHOOLHOUSE


8


obstacles existed 10 years ago as a barrier to the c
lassroom of today. It will require the vision
and fortitude of educational and governmental leaders to bring this vision to bear.



EXPLORING THE NEW SCHOOLHOUSE


9


References:

C
enter for Teaching and Learning. (n.d.). Google apps. Retrieved May 7, 2011, from Center for

Teaching and Learning: University of North Carolina, Charlotte:
http://teaching.uncc.edu

/e
-
learning
-
tool/google
-
apps

Chung, I. (2004). A comparative assessment of constructivist and traditionalist approaches to

establishing mathematical connections in le
a
rning multiplication.
Education
, 125 (2),
271
-
278.

Echevarria, J., Vogt, M., & Short, D. (2007). Making content comprehensible for english

learners: The siop model . Boston: Allyn & Bacon/Pearson Education.

E
dutopia Staff. (2008, February 28).
Why teach
with project
-
based learning: Providing students
with a well
-
rounded classroom experience
. Retrieved March 18, 2011, from Edutopia:
http://www.edutopia.org/project
-
learning
-
introduction


Elmer
-
DeWitt, P. (2011, May 5). Nielsen: Apple's ipad still commands 8
2% of the u.s. tablet

market. Retrieved

May 8, 2011, from CNNMoney:
http://tech.fortune.cnn.com

-
/2011/05/05/nielsen
-
apples
-
ipad
-
stil
l
-
commands
-
82
-
of
-
the
-
u
-
s
-
tablet
market/

-
http://tech.fortune.cnn.com/2010/03/10/the
-
ipad
-
changes
-
everything

Guskey, T.
(1998).
The age of our accountability
.
Journal of Staff Development, 9

(4), 36
-
44.

Forester, S., Sarpalius, C., & Barsallo, D. (2009). Instructional technology plan: 2009
-
2011.

Hurst
-
Euless
-
Bedford ISD.

Johnson, L., Smith, R., Levine, A., & Haywood, K.
(2010). 2010 horizon report: K
-
12 edition.

Austin, TX: The New Media Consortium.

Kissko, J. (2010, September 24). Top 5 ways to use augmented reality in education: Part 1 of 5



EXPLORING THE NEW SCHOOLHOUSE


10


second life. Retrieved May 6, 2011, from K
-
12 Mobile Learning:
http://www.k1
2

mobilelearning.com/?p=107

Learning Games to Go project. (n.d.). Retrieved May 6, 2011, from Lure of the Labyrinth:

http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/

Moore, R. (2006). The five best accelerators i
n schools.
School Administrator
, 63

(7), 8.

Royal
Society of the Arts. (2010, October 14).

RSA animate
-

changing education paradigms
.
Retrie
ved May 15, 2011, from YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=

zDZFcDGpL4U&feature=relmfu

Solomon, G., & Schrum, L. (2007).
Web 2.0: new tools, new schools.

Eugene,

OR: International
Society for Technology in Education.

Verizon Foundation. (n.d.).
State standards search
. Retrieved May 15, 2011, from Thinkfinity:
http://www.thinkfinity.org/state
-
standards
-
search?start=0&id=TX&grade=5&subject

=Science

Wells, J., & Lew
is, L. (2006).
Internet access in u.s. public schools and classrooms: 1994
-
2005.

U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Educational Statistics. Washington,
DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.






EXPLORING THE NEW SCHOOLHOUSE


11



Appendix

Julia H. Wilson


9037 Saranac Trail
,
Fort Worth, TX 76118

817
-
595
-
9627 / 817
-
905
-
7216

juliawilson@hebisd.edu



EDUCATION/CERTIFICATION


MEd. Instructional Technology Leadership

with Principal Certification

-

Lamar University
:

expected completion December 2011

B. A. History/Elementary
Education



University of Texas at Arlington
:

December 1995


SBEC

Certification
s
:



Principal certification (TExES completed 08/11; expected certification upon
graduation)



Provisional Life: Self
-
contained/History Grades 1
-
8: Effective 12/16/95



English as a S
econd Language Supplemental Grades 1
-
8: Effective

08/04/2007


LEADERSHIP EXPERIENCE:

Wilshire
Campus Improvement Team

Member
: 2007
-

2009; 2011
-
present



Developed the campus comprehensive needs assessment and campus
improvement plan designed to ensure
student success through authentic
analysis and response to data by students, teachers, parents, and
community members.



Developed and implemented programs to increase student performance in
early fluency and comprehension, ongoing number sense, and higher
-
o
rder thinking skills.



Allocated resources to support professional development in technology
integration and student
-
centered learning strategies.


Wilshire Instructional Leadership Team Member: 2008
-
present



Organized and led goal teams and professional lea
rning communities for
data
-
driven decision making and pursuit of campus goals



Facilitated development of campus mission statement and
improvement
goals



Facilitated campus professional development opportunities that related to
campus goals and professional
learning communities’ needs assessments


Wilshire Quality Instruction/Technology Integration Team Leader: 2008
-

present



Created and implemented professional development framework for
technology integration into instructional best practices

EXPLORING THE NEW SCHOOLHOUSE


12




Analyzed campus

data and used trends to create professional
development plan and instructional goals for 2011
-
2012 school year



Fourth Grade Lead Teacher
-

Arlington ISD:
1999
-

2003



Facilitated development of curriculum to support district scope and
sequence



Developed

tutorial program and curriculum for TAAS/TAKS
remediation



Represented grade level on campus leadership team



Developed and implemented foruth grade behavior management plan



Supervised all grade level behavioral and academic intervention
conferences



Organized and updated grade level student data management system



Participated in campus needs assessment and budgeting meetings


Summer school administrator: Arlington ISD


2001



Supervised instruction for all K
-
6 classes



Implemented campus behavior expect
ations plan



Conducted parent conferences to discuss behavioral concerns and
academic progress; submitted final recommendations for further study
and grade advancement



Managed summer school budget, payroll, and student records


TEACHING EXPERIENCE:

Fifth
g
rade
t
eacher


Wilshire Elementary



Hurst
-
Euless
-
Bedford ISD
:
August 2007 to present



Implemented district curriculum in language arts, US History,
mathematics, and science



Developed and implemented differentiated instruction for small group
instruction,
individual student intervention, and sheltered instruction



Collaborated with parents and students to analyze student data and
develop plans for student success



Communicated with stakeholders via school website, email, phone,
and written information



Integra
ted various technology hardware and productivity tools into
classroom instruction, including document camera/projector,
podcasting, word processing/desktop publishing/presentation software



Developed and implemented grade level expectations statements and
b
ehavior support/modification plan



Facilitated behavioral and academic intervention conferences, ARD
staffings, and RtI meetings



Utilized information management tools to collect and analyze student
data, including Pinnacle GlobalScholar and Assessment Data
Manager
(ADM)


EXPLORING THE NEW SCHOOLHOUSE


13


Fourth grade teacher


Sherrod Elementary


Arlington ISD: August 1998 to
May 2003



Developed and implemented lessons in accordance with district
curriculum standards in all subject areas



Developed and implemented differentiated instruction
for small group
instruction and individual intervention



Conducted regular parent conferences to discuss academic and
personal progress of students and to address specific concerns



Supervised and approved lesson plans and objectives for the fourth
grade tea
m; developed tutorial curriculum for TAAS/TAKS remediation



Acted as administrative liaison for the fourth grade team



Developed and implemented grade level expectations statements and
behavior support/modification plan; supervised all disciplinary and
acade
mic intervention conferences



Managed/organized grade level budget and classroom student records


Summer school teacher


grades 2
-
4



Arlington ISD: 1999 &2002



Worked with small, multi
-
age groups on focused skill intervention



Provided on
-
on
-
one tutoring f
or specific skill areas in reading and
mathematics



Created scaffolded lessons based on district curriculum



Conducted parent conferences to outline student progress and make
recommendations for further study and grade advancement


01/96 to 05/98

Classroom t
eacher
ROQUEMORE ELEMENTARY


Arlington
ISD:
January 1996 to May 1998

05/96 to 05/98

Fourth grade classroom teacher; heterogeneous self
-
contained
classroom


01/96 to 05/96


Sixth grade classroom teacher; heterogeneous self
-
contained
classroom


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (2009


present)



Ruby Payne: A Framework for Understanding Poverty: February 2010



Short Cycle Predictive Assessment and High Yield Strategies for Goal Team
Cadre: October 2009



Thinking Approach to Problem
-
Solving: January
-
August 20
09 (18 hours)



Moodle Online Classroom Training: September 2010
-
February 2011(12 hours)



Podcasting, Photostory, and Movie Maker Training: Fall 2010 (6 hours)

EXPLORING THE NEW SCHOOLHOUSE


14


PRESENTATIONS



Wilson, J. (2010).
Introduction to SMART Board and SMART Notebook
.
Presented at
Wilshire Elementary School Professional Development Session,
Euless, TX.



Wilson, J. (2010).
Making Outlook 2007 Calendar Functions Work for You
.
Presented at Wilshire Elementary School Professional Development Session,
Euless, TX.



Wilson, J. (2011).
Introd
uction to the SMART Response System
. Presented at
Wilshire Elementary School Professional Development Session, Euless, TX.



Wilson, J. (2011).
Introduction to SMART Board and SMART Notebook
.
Presented at Wilshire Elementary School Professional Development S
ession,
Euless, TX.



Wilson, J. (2011).
Using Online Rubric Generators for Authentic Assessment
.
Presented at Wilshire Elementary School Technology Progressive Dinner,
Euless, TX.



Wilson, J. (2011).
Introduction to Moodle Online Classes for Professional Boo
k
Study. Presented at Wilshire Elementary School Professional Development
Session
, Euless, TX


PROFESSIONAL PUBLICATIONS:



Shirley, M. (1998).
The writing house
. Grapevine, Texas: SchoolHouse Secrets
Unlimited. (Editor) ISBN # 0966196821



Reference
s

prov
ided upon request.