Agricultural biotechnology

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Oct 22, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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Agricultural biotechnology

Christos Dordas

Assistant Professor

Faculty of Agricultrure

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki


Tempus Project CD_JEP
-
27218
-
2006 (GE): Developing New
Applied Biosciences and Biotechnology Curricula at Tbilisi State
University

Outline


The Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and
the faculty of Agriculture


Agricultural biotechnology


ECTS in AU


Quality assessments in AU.


Thessaloniki

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki


13 different faculty


>

70000 students


>3000
teaching and research staff (professors,
associate professors
,
assistants professors,
and
lecturers)


>
1500 administrative and technical support
staff

The Aristotle University has the
following Faculties:


Faculty of Agriculture


Faculty of Forestry and Natural Environment



Faculty of Veterinary Science


Faculty of Medicine


Faculty of Dentistry


Faculty of Theology
with the Departments: Theology, Pastoral and Social Theology.


Faculty of Sciences
with the Departments: Mathematics, Physics, Biology, Geology,
Chemistry, Informatics.


Faculty of Fine Arts
with the Departments: Visual and Applied Arts, Music Studies,
Theatre Studies.


Faculty of Law and Economic Sciences
with the Departments: Law, Economic Sciences.


Faculty of Education
with the Departments: Early Childhood Education, Primary
Education.


Faculty of Education at Florina
with the Departments: Early Childhood Education,
Primary Education.


Faculty of Engineering
with the Departments: Civil Engineering, Architecture, Rural and
Survey Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Chemical
Engineering, General Faculty of Physical and Mathematical Sciences.


Faculty of Philosophy
with the Departments: Philology, History and Archaeology,
Philosophy and Education, Psychology, English Language and Literature, French
Language and Literature, German Language and Literature, Italian language and literature.


Independent
Departments:


Pharmacy (Thessaloniki), Physical Education and Athletics (Thessaloniki), Physical
Education and Athletics (Serres), Jurnalism and Mass Communication (Thessaloniki),
Balkan Studies (Florina).

Faculty of Agriculture


>
2700

registered undergraduate students,
221 Master of Science
students, and
138
Doctoral degree

candidates.


11
1

Teaching and Research Staff members
and 80 supporting stuff


The faculty has awarded nearly 10.500 BSc
degrees, 750 MSc degrees and
25
0 Doctoral
degrees

Faculty of Agriculture


Department of Animal Production



Department of Field Crops and Ecology


Department of Horticulture and Viticulture



Department of Plant Protection



Department of Agricultural Economics



Department of Hydraulics, Soil Science and
Agricultural Engineering



Department of Food Science and Technology


Agriculture


More focus on new technologies and
especially biotechnology in different aspects
of agriculture

Agricultural biotechnology


A collection of scientific techniques, including genetic
engineering.


Used to improve plants, animals and microorganisms.


Can modify crops and livestock more precisely than
traditional breeding methods.



Potential benefits and goals


Safer food supply for consumers


Less impact on the environment


Less expensive food production


Crops less vulnerable to insects, diseases and weeds


Crops with higher/greater nutritional content


Crops used for new materials and energy sources


Crops developed as production vehicles for medicines and
vaccines to prevent disease



Potential risks being evaluated


Farmworker and consumer safety


Environmental effects on plants, animals and water
systems


Genes moving from genetically engineered crops
into wild plants


Pests eventually developing resistance to pest
-
resistant crops


Introduction of allergy
-
causing compounds into
foods


Biotechnology
-

t
he
p
rogram


In the first two years, students

develop a strong and general
background in biological

science with an emphasis on
fundamental concepts

and basic principles of genetics,
molecular

biology and cell biology.

Two

options,


Plant Biotechnology,


Animal Biotechnology,


Provide

in
-
depth training and specialized knowledge in

an
y
aspect of biotechnology. Each option
needs

a

strong laboratory
component to reinforce the theoretical

concepts.



Students also
should
do an internship
or practical training
in
a

biotechnology company or university or government

laboratory


Proposed courses

Preparatory Subject Matter


Introductory Biology


Inorganic
Chemistry


Organic Chemistry


Physical Chemistry


Mathematics


Physics


Statistics



Computer

Science


Genetics


Biochemistry


Molecular Biology


Microbiology


Animal Biology
(anatomy, metabolism and physiology)


Molecular Genetics


Professionalism and Ethics in Genomics and Biotechnology


Laboratory Research in Genomics and Biotechnology

Plant Biotechnology Option


Plant Biochemistry


Plant Genetics


Principles of Plant Biotechnology


Plant Genetics and Biotechnology Laboratory


Introduction to Bioinformatics


Seed Production and Quality


Entomology


Biochemistry laboratory


Advanced Eukaryotic Genetics


Nematology


Plant Pathology

(Introduction to Plant Pathology, Fungal Biotechnology and


Biochemistry, Agricultural Biotechnology and Public Policy)


Crop production courses


Weed science


Evolution of Crop Plants


Rhizosphere Ecology


Plant, Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture


Introduction to Plant Breeding


Postharvest Physiology and Handling of Horticultural Commodities


Developmental Plant Anatomy


Plant Physiology


Plant Growth and Development


Physiology of Environmental Stresses

in Plants


Mineral Nutrition of Plants


More courses in plant science

Animal
Biotechnology Option



Biochemistry of Animal Organism


Advanced Eukaryotic Genetics


Molecular Biology Laboratory Techniques


Neurobiology,

Physiology, and Behavior


Embryology


Principles of Genomics


Ethics of Animal Use


Animal Cytogenetics


Pathology,

Microbiology, and Immunology


Molecular, Cellular,

and Integrative Physiology


Genetics and Animal Breeding
,


Reproduction and Early Development in Aquatic Animals


Avian Development and Genetics


Population and Quantitative Genetics


Advanced Eukaryotic Genetics


Introduction to Bioinformatics


Farm animal production


Physiology of Farm Animals Nutrition


A few courses in plant science


More courses in animal science


European Credit Transfer and
Accumulation System


What is a credit system?


A credit system is a systematic way of
describing an educational programme by
attaching credits to its components. The
definition of credits in higher education
systems may be based on different
parameters, such as student workload,
learning outcomes and contact hours.

What is ECTS?


The European Credit Transfer and
Accumulation System is a student
-
centred
system based on the
student workload

required to achieve the objectives of a
programme, objectives preferably specified
in terms of the
learning outcomes

and
competences to be acquired.

How did ECTS develop?



ECTS was introduced in 1989, within the framework of
Erasmus, now part of the Socrates programme.


ECTS is the only credit system which has been successfully
tested and used across Europe. ECTS was set up initially for
credit transfer.


The system facilitated the recognition of periods of study
abroad and thus enhanced the quality and volume of
student mobility in Europe.


Recently ECTS is developing into an accumulation system
to be implemented at institutional, regional, national and
European level. This is one of the key objectives of the
Bologna Declaration of June 1999.



Why introduce ECTS?


ECTS makes study programmes easy to read and
compare for all students, local and foreign.


ECTS facilitates mobility and academic recognition.


ECTS helps universities to organise and revise their
study programmes.


ECTS can be used across a variety of programmes
and modes of delivery.


ECTS makes European higher education more
attractive for students from abroad.

What are the key features of ECTS?


ECTS is based on the principle that 60 credits measure the workload of a full
-
time student during one academic year. The student workload of a full
-
time
study programme in Europe amounts in most cases to around 1500
-
1800 hours
per year and in those cases
one credit stands for around 25 to 30 working hours.


Credits in ECTS can only be obtained after
successful completion

of the work
required and appropriate assessment of the learning outcomes achieved.
Learning outcomes are sets of competences, expressing what the student will
know, understand or be able to do after completion of a process of learning, long
or short.


Student workload in ECTS consists of the time required to complete all planned
learning activities such as attending lectures, seminars, independent and private
study, preparation of projects and examinations.


Credits are allocated to all educational components of a study programme (such
as modules, courses, placements, dissertation work, etc.) and reflect the quantity
of work each component requires to achieve its specific objectives or learning
outcomes in relation to the total quantity of work necessary to complete a full
year of study successfully.


What are the key features of ECTS?


The performance of the student is documented by a local/national grade.
It is good practice to add an ECTS grade, in particular in case of credit
transfer. The ECTS grading scale ranks the students on a statistical basis.
Therefore, statistical data on student performance is a prerequisite for
applying the ECTS grading system.


Grades are assigned among students with a pass grade as follows:


A best 10%


B next 25%


C next 30%


D next 25%


E next 10%


A distinction is made between the grades FX and F that are used for
unsuccessful students. FX means: “fail
-

some more work required to
pass” and F means: “fail


considerable further work required”. The
inclusion of failure rates in the Transcript of Records is optional.


ECTS is
:


a tool for transparency


a tool for fairness by recognition


a tool for permanent curriculum
development


Quality Assurance

in the European Higher Education Area


European Association for Quality Assurance
in Higher Education (ENQA)

European standards for quality
assurance in higher education


Part 1: European standards and guidelines for
internal quality assurance
within higher
education institutions


Part 2: European standards for the
external
quality assurance
of higher education


Part 3: European standards for
external
quality assurance agencies

Part 1: European standards and guidelines for
internal quality assurance within higher
education institutions


1.1 Policy and procedures for quality assurance.


1.2 Approval, monitoring and periodic review of
programmes and awards.


1.3 Assessment of students.


1.4 Quality assurance of teaching staff.


1.5 Learning resources and student support.


1.6 Information systems.


1.7 Public information.

Part 2: European standards for the external
quality assurance of higher education


2.1 Use of internal quality assurance procedures.


2.2 Development of external quality assurance
processes.


2.3 Criteria for decisions.


2.4 Processes fit for purpose.


2.5 Reporting.


2.6 Follow
-
up procedures.


2.7 Periodic reviews.


2.8 System
-
wide analyses.

Part 3: European standards for external quality
assurance agencies


3.1 Use of external quality assurance procedures for higher
education:


3.2 Official status (Agencies should be formally recognised).


3.3 Activities: (Agencies should undertake external quality
assurance activities (at institutional or programme level) on a
regular basis.).


3.4 Resources.

Part 3: European standards for external quality
assurance agencies


3.5 Mission statement.


3.6 Independence.


3.7 External quality assurance criteria and
processes used by the agencies.


3.8 Accountability procedures: (Agencies
should have in place procedures for their
own accountability.)




Plant and animal
Biotechnology


First semester


Introductory Biology


Inorganic
Chemistry


Mathematics


Physics



Electives


Second semester


Organic Chemistry


Physical Chemistry


Statistics


Genetics


Electives


Plant and animal
Biotechnology


Third semester


Plant anatomy


Biochemistry


Microbiology


Animal biology


Electives


Forth semester


Plant Physiology


Systematics



Biochemistry laboratory


Principles of crop production


Electives

Plant Biotechnology Option


Fifth semester


Molecular biology


Plant Biochemistry


Plant Genetics


Principles of Plant Biotechnology


Electives



Sixth semester


Introduction to Bioinformatics


Seed Production and Quality


Entomology


Weed science


Electives


Plant Biotechnology Option


Seventh semester


Advanced Eukaryotic Genetics


Nematology


Plant Pathology


Professionalism and Ethics in Genomics and Biotechnology


Plant Genetics and Biotechnology Laboratory


Electives



Eighth semester


Plant, Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture


Plant Breeding


Molecular genetics


Postharvest Physiology and Handling of Horticultural Commodities


Electives

Electives


Introduction to Plant Pathology,


Fungal Biotechnology and Biochemistry,


Agricultural Biotechnology and Public Policy


Evolution of Crop Plants


Rhizosphere Ecology


Developmental Plant Anatomy


Plant Growth and Development


Physiology of Environmental Stresses

in Plants


Mineral Nutrition of Plants


Crop production courses

Animal
Biotechnology Option



Fifth semester


Biochemistry of Animal Organism


Advanced Eukaryotic Genetics


Molecular Biology Laboratory Techniques


Neurobiology,

Physiology, and Behavior


Electives



Sixth semester


Embryology


Principles of Genomics


Ethics of Animal Use


Animal Cytogenetics


Electives


Animal
Biotechnology Option



Seventh semester


Pathology,

Microbiology, and Immunology


Molecular, Cellular,

and Integrative Physiology


Genetics and Animal Breeding
,


Reproduction and Early Development in Aquatic Animals


Electives



Eighth semester


Avian Development and Genetics


Population and Quantitative Genetics


Advanced Eukaryotic Genetics


Introduction to Bioinformatics


Farm animal production


Physiology of Farm Animals Nutrition


Electives


Electives


Biochemistry of Animal Organism


Population and Quantitative Genetics of Farm Animals


Physiology of Reproduction in Farm Animals


Biology of Honey Bee


Genetic Improvement of Farm Animals


Physiology of Farm Animals Nutrition I


Apiculture


Range Management


Applied Reproduction in Farm Animals


Physiology of Farm Animals Nutrition II


Dairy Technology


Description, Preservation and Technology of Feeds


Applied Ruminant Nutrition


Cattle Production


Artificial Insemination


Rabbit and Fur Animal Production


Poultry Production


Applied Nutrition of Monogastric Animals


Pig Production


Applied Poultry Nutrition


Ichthyology and Fishery


Sheep and Goat Production


Carcass and Meat Quality Evaluation



Undergraduate Programme Courses



First Semester


General Mathematics


Physics


General Inorganic Chemistry


Principles of Economics


Elective Group A


Foreign Language


Second Semester


Organic Chemistry


Plant Anatomy and Morphology


Agricultural Economics


Elective Group B


Elective Group B


Foreign Language

Undergraduate Programme Courses


Third semester


Soil Science


Plant Physiology


Metereology
-
Climatology


Elective Group A


Elective Group A


Foreign Language


Fourth semester


General Ecology


Systematic Botany


Statistics


Elective Group B


Elective Group B


Foreign Language


Elective courses


Elective Courses (Group A)


Sociology


General Biochemistry


Cooperation


Farm Power and Machinery


Anatomy
-
Physiology of Animal


Agricultural Technology


Computer
-
Programming


Geology
-
Petrography


Elective Courses (Group B)


Animal Breeding and Farming


General Mathematics II


General Microbiology


Genetics


Agricultural Hydraulics


Principles of Agronomy


General Zoology


Plant /Crop specialization


Fifth Semester


Agricultural Experimentation


Soil Fertility


Principles of Plant Pathology


Pesticides Ι


Elective Group A


Elective Group A


Sixth Semester


Weed Science


General Pomology


General Viticulture


General Entomology ΙΙ


Elective Group B


Elective Group B

Plant /Crop specialization


Seventh Semester


Agricultural Genetics


Field Crops I (Cereals, Legumes, Forages)


Mineral Nutrients and Fertilizers


Vegetable Crops Ι


Elective
Group
A


Elective

Group

A


Eighth Semester


Field Crops II (Industrial Crops)


Field Crops II (Practicals)


Plant Breeding


Agricultural Ecology


Elective
Group
B


Elective
Group
B


Plant /Crop specialization


Ninth Semester


Farm Mechanization


Irrigation Principles and Practice


Mycological Diseases of Field Crops


Pests of Vegetables and Field Crops


Prices of Agricultural Products


Elective Group A


Tenth Semester


Seed Production


Meadows, Pastures and Range Management


Elective Group B


Elective Group B


Elective Group B


Elective Courses (Group A)


From the Department


Sustainable Development of Agric. Resources


Analytical Agricultural Chemistry


Mycological Diseases of Field Crops (Practicals)


Pests of Vegetables and Field Crops, (Practicals)


Fruit Crops (Deciduous Fruit Trees)


Fruit Crops (Deciduous Fruit Trees) (Practicals)


Nematology


Drying and Storage of Agricultural Products


Principles of Plant Virology


Productivity and Planning in Agriculture


Aromatic and Medicinal Plants


From other Departments


Floriculture Ι


Viticulture Ι


Beekeeping


Pests of Stored Products


International Trade of Agricultural Products


Agricultural Cooperation


Agricultural Education


Agricultural Technology


Agricultural Extension

Elective Courses (Group B)


From the Department


Environmental Chemistry


Wetlands and Agriculture


Viral Diseases ΙΙ


Greenhouse Vegetable Crop Production


Irrigation Systems


Genetics and Plant Breeding (Practicals)


Outdoor Ornamental Plants


Acarology



From other Departments


Problematic Soils


Cereal Technology


Marketing of Agricultural Products


Introduction to Vegetable Crop Production


Marketing of Plant Products


Animal Production Specialization
Courses



Fifth Semester


Biochemistry of Animal Organism


Population and Quantitative Genetics of Farm Animals


Physiology of Reproduction in Farm Animals


Biology of Honey Bee


Elective Group Α


Sixth Semester


Genetic Improvement of Farm Animals


Physiology of Farm Animals Nutrition I


Apiculture


Range Management


Elective Group B


Animal Production Specialization
Courses


Seventh Semester


Applied Reproduction in Farm Animals


Physiology of Farm Animals Nutrition II


Dairy Technology


Description, Preservation and Technology of Feeds


Elective Group Α


Elective Group Α


Eighth Semester


Applied Ruminant Nutrition


Cattle Production


Artificial Insemination


Livestock Buildings


Elective Group B


Elective Group B



Animal Production Specialization
Courses


Ninth Semester


Rabbit and Fur Animal Production


Poultry Production


Applied Nutrition of Monogastric Animals


Pig Production


Elective Group Α


Elective Group Α


Tenth Semester


Applied Poultry Nutrition


Ichthyology and Fishery


Sheep and Goat Production


Carcass and Meat Quality Evaluation


Elective Group B


Elective Group B


Elective Courses (Group A)


From the Department


New Techniques in Reproduction



Physiology of Milk Secretion



Hygiene and Elementary Clinic Pathology of Farm Anim


Animal Behaviour


Animal Growth



Applications of Computers in Animal Production



From other Departments


Analytical Chemistry



Field Crops I (Cereals, Legumes, Forages)



Science and Technology of Meat
-
Fish and Eggs



Prices of Agricultural Products


Elective Courses (Group B)


From the Department


Fish Culture


Horse Production


Metabolic Role of Hormones in the Farm Animal Nutrition


Endocrinology of Farm Animals


Immunology


Sericulture


From other Departments


Economics of Livestock Production


Principles of Agronomy


Livestock Farm Mechanization and Farm Waste Manag


Bee Pathology


Agricultural biotechnology


Every living organism, from the smallest and most

primitive
bacteria to every plant, insect, animal or

human being,
contains DNA as the primary genetic

material.


DNA

directs all cellular processes, creating

the incredible

variety and diversity of living organisms

in the biosphere.
Biotechnology focuses on the

mechanics of life processes and
their application.


Biotechnology means “life technology” and represents

an
integrated, multidisciplinary field, with a

profound impact
today on almost every aspect of

human endeavor.