Re-Mapping the New Self

glassesbeepingAI and Robotics

Oct 20, 2013 (4 years and 21 days ago)

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Re
-
Mapping the New Self



As you learn how to use the meditative and contemplative process
to create a new reality, you will begin the process of re
-
mapping your
subconscious mind. And once you comprehend and repeatedly execute
the “how
-
to” steps
you’ll learn here

over the next few sessions
, you can
then work on
“anything”

that you want to change in your life. Remind
yourself often that in taking these

steps


to change
. And remind yourself
that
you are pruning away the habit of being yourself so

that you can
create a new mind (
or more
effective brain
-
body activity) for your new
future.



In the beginning, the newness of the task you are undertaking
might cause you to feel unsettled or uncomfortable. That’s okay and
very normal.
Change is always

unsettling because you are moving out of
deeply rooted habits and beginning to plant and grow new ones.
It’s just
your body, which has become your mind

through its chemical
neurological process that is
resisting the new training process.



Understand this before you initiate your discipline, and relax

each

step


is designed to be easy to understand and simple to follow.
Personally, I look forward to my meditation
and contemplation
practice
s

as much as anything
else that
I do. I find
medit
ation to be essential for
greater
harmony, order, inner
-
peace, love, clarity, and inspiration
.
Therefore,
I rarely miss a day. It took some time for me to arrive at this
level of intimacy and
relationship with ‘myself’ and the Source of all
Intelligence,

so please be patient with your


self.




My Learning Philosophy



I’ve held many leadership
and supervisory
positions
both
in my
military
career
and
civilian
career. In some cases, I had very little time
to learn
these
new position
s

and the
range of
duties and responsibilities
that came with
them forced me to stick with a solid learning
methodology.
What proved to be the most valuable methodology
to

learn

a
new
series of tasks has been
the ability to
turn


small steps


into
2


one easy habit. In other
words, whenever we learn anything new
(
that
requires our full attention and commitment to practice
)
, we normally
follow specific

steps


during
y
our initial instruction period. That’s what
I found to be
most helpful.
This makes it easier to break down th
e
complexities of
a set of
skill
s

or task
s

s
o the mind can stay focused
on
one step at a time
without be
coming
overwhelmed. In any endeavor, of
course, your goal is to memorize what you’re learning so that eventually
you can do it naturally, effortlessly,

and subconsciously. Essentially, you
want to make this new skill
or set of tasks
a habit.



It’s easier to comprehend and execute any new skill when by
repetition
;

you master one small task or procedure at a time and then
move on to the next

one
. Over time you string each

step


together as
part of one coordinated process. The sign that you’re on your way is
when all the

steps


start to look like one easy, fluid motion
,

and you
produce the intended result
s
. That’s your aim in leaning this med
itation
and contemplation practice
also. We’re going to lean them
step
-
by
-
step
.





For example, in learning to hit a golf ball, there are a host of cues
that your mind has to process in order to have your actions match your
intention. Imagine that w
hile you’re preparing to tee off for the first
time, your best friend shouts, “Keep your head down! Bend your knees!
Shoulders square and back erect! Keep your front arm straight, but
loosen your grip! Shift your weight when you swing! Hit behind the

ball
and follow through!” And

most of all…
relax.




All these instructions
(
at once
)

could throw you into a state of
paralysis. What if, instead, you worked on one thing at a time, following
a methodical order? In time, it seems logical that your swing would look
like one motion. That’s what a ‘procedural memory’ is. This
phenomenon o
ccurs when you do anything long enough. You begin to
know that you know how

to do it
.
We use the same methodology to
build a neural
-
network for meditation and contemplation.



Remember that the more knowledge you have

on a particular
subject of interes
t
, the better prepared you are for a new experience.
For
example, if you only read a few pages from a Law book on Courtroom
procedures, and you needed to contest a complaint in Court, the attorney
who has completed Law School with 5 years of
continuous
Cou
rtroom
experience would dance circles around you

in Court
. Not because
you’re not smart

enough
, but because they possess a great databank of
Courtroom knowledge then you do
!

Every meditation

step


you practice
3


will have a meaning based on what you learn
ed earlier
, and are learning
now,

about QMeditation. Each technique is
based on a
scientific or
philosophical
understanding
,

so that nothing is left to conjecture. The

steps


are presented in a specific order
and
designed to help you
memorize this proce
ss for personal change. Although I have mapped
out a suggested four to five session program to learn the entire process,
please take as much time as you need to practice each

step


until it
becomes familiar

to you
. The best pace to set
for yourself
is one that is
comfortable so
that
you never feel overwhelmed.


The

Bridge of Light


Program

Suggested 3
rd

& 4
th

Saturday Program



Here’s a brief overview.
You will begin every contemplation
session by doing the previous

steps


you learned,
and then

practice the
new material for that week. Because it’s more effective to learn some

steps


together, some weeks will ask you to practice two or more new
steps. Also, I recommend that you practice each new contemplation

step,


or group of

steps,


for a
t least a week before you move on to the
next one. In a few weeks, you’ll build quite a neural
-
network for
both
meditation and contemplation.


Week One:



Every day, do
Step

1: Induction.


Week Two:



Start every daily session by once again






pr
acticing the first
Step
; then add
Step

2:






Recognizing.
Step

3: Admitting and






Declaring, and
Step

4: Surrendering.


Week Three:



Start every daily session by practicing






Steps

1 through 4, then add
Step

5:







Observing and Remind
ing and
Step

6:






Redirecting.


Week Four:



Start every daily session by practicing






Steps

1 through 6,
and then

add
Step

7:






Creating and Rehearsing.



Please take your time and build a strong foundation. If you are
already an exper
ienced meditator and want to do more at once, that’s
fine, but
please
work at following all the instructions and committing
4


what you will be doing to memory. When you can concentrate on what
you’re doing without letting your thoughts wander to any extrane
ous
stimuli, you will come to a point when your body actually aligns with
your mind. Now your ne
w skill will become easier and e
asier to do,
thanks to Hebb’s Law of firing and wiring. The ingredients of learning,
attention, instruction, and practice will

develop an associated neural
network to reflect your intentions.


Preparing Your Tool Kit



Writing
. Separately from your QMeditation sessions, you will read
some descriptive text about each

step,


often accompanied by questions
and prompts under the heading “Opportunity to Write.” I
strongly
recommend that you keep a notebook handy to write down your
answers. Then review your responses before you go into each day’s
contemplation

session
. That wa
y, your written thoughts can serve as a
road
-
map to prepare you to navigate through the contemplative
procedures in which you will access the operating system of your
subconscious

mind
.



Listening
. When you are first learning the contemplation

steps,


you may want to listen to prerecorded guided sessions. For example,
you will learn an ‘induction’ technique that you will use in every on
e

of
your daily sessions, to help you reach the highly coherent Alpha brain
-
wave state in preparation for the approac
h that is the
focus of Week Two
and Week Four. I will be giving you the guided scripts for each week
when we next meet on the 3
rd

& 4
th

Saturday
s

in May

and June
.


Checking Your Tools



Location
. You have learned that overcoming your environment is
a critical step in breaking the habit of being your old self.
Finding the
right environment in which to meditate

and do contemplation (
one with
a minimum of distraction
s)
, will really give you a leg
up on defeating the
first of the ‘Big Three’ (Body, Environment & Time). Pick a
comfortable place where you can be alone and not be seduced by the
addiction
s

to
the external world. Make
your comfortable space
secluded,
private, and easily accessible.



Go to this place every day, and make it your special location
. I call
it a
sacred space. You will form a strong connection with this
new
setting. It will represent where you frequent to tame the distracted ego,
overcome the old self, create a new self,

and forge a new destiny. In time
5


you will truly look forward to being there. When you want to build a new
neural
-
network, it makes good sense to do your meditation and
contemplation practices in a setting that represents growth,

health,
regeneration, an
d a new future. Please do not see this location as a
torture chamber in which you have to meditate

in
. This type of attitude
will undermine your efforts.



It’s vital to prevent distractions from your environment. Make sure
you won’t be interrupted or

distracted by people (a Do Not Disturb

sign
)
can help
if you live with roommates. As much as possible, eliminate
sensory stimuli that could force your mind back to your old personality
or to awareness of the external world, especially to elements of your

familiar environment. Turn off your phone, cell phone, and computer; I
know it’s hard, but those calls, texts, tweets, IMs, and emails can wait.
You also don’t want the aroma of coffee brewing or food cooking to waft
into your meditation setting. Ensur
e that the room is a
t a

comfortable
temperature, with no drafts.



The Body
.
Position is everything when it comes to meditation

and
contemplation
. I sit up very straight. My back is totally vertical, my
neck is erect, my hands are folded comfortably in my lap, and I don’t
interlace the fingers. My arms and legs are resting poised and still, and
my body is totally relaxed. I suggest that you do
not cross you limbs.
You may use a recliner for the comfort of sitting, but I don’t recommend
that you
fully
recline. That might trigger the body’s sleep response.
Sitting upright in a regular but comfortable chair or sitting on the sofa is
fine. If yo
u prefer to sit on the ground supported by pillows, and cross
your legs “Indian
-
style,” that’s fine too.



Preventing bodily distraction is key
!

My spiritual teachers call this
“rising above body consciousness.”
In effect, you want to ‘put the body
awa
y’ so that you can focus without needing to pay it any attention

to the
body
.

The body has a built
-
n autonomic
-
nervous
-
system that regulates
and maintains all of the bodily functions without needing your conscious
attention. Before you get started,
use
the restroom before sitting for
meditation. Dress in loose clothes, remove your watch, drink a little
water, and have more
water
within reach. Take care of any hunger
pangs before you begin, but don’t eat a heavy meal.



Heading nodding vs. nodding off

to sleep
?

Since we’re talking
about the body, let me address an issue

that may come up in your own
meditation practice. Although you are sitting upright, you may find your
6


head nodding as though you are about to fall asleep. This is a good
sign:

you
are moving into the Alpha and Theta brain
-
wave states.


Your
body is used to lying down when your brain waves slow down. When
you suddenly “nod” like this, your body wants to doze off. With
continued practice, you’ll become accustomed to your brain slow
ing
down while you sit upright. The head nodding will eventually stop, and
your body won’t tend to fall asleep.



Making time to meditate

is essential for success. When to
meditate? As you know, daily changes in brain chemistry result in easier
access to the subconscious mind just after you wake up in the morning

is one such time

and before you go to bed at night

is the other
. These
are
the best times to meditate because you can more readily slip into the
Alpha or Theta states.
Personally,
I prefer to meditate in the early
morning hours around the same time every morning. If you are really
enthusiastic and would like to meditate at both

these times of day, go for
it. However, I suggest that folks just starting out do so once a day.



How long to meditate varies according to your level of
commitment to yourself
?

The art of unconditional love is very foreign to
us

in Western countries
.

We’ve not been properly educated in the arena
of unconditional love.
Silent m
editation is one of the most essential
practices
for teaching yourself unconditional. The practice itself will
ground you to the point where knowing
how to love yourself
uncon
ditionally

becomes natural
.
Sitting in meditation is
a

sacred

time
of great
and profound
intimacy with
in

yourself
. You begin to learn
about yourself

at a
much
deep
er

level of
self
-
awareness
and familiarity
that cannot be achieved
by
any other
intentional

inward
practice.




Therefore, the amount of time that you devote to meditation every
day is also a reflection of the amount of unconditional love that you are
growing for yourself. I suggest that beginners start with just 10 minutes
a day to get use to how the body begins t
o settle
-
down and relax out of
its’ habitual flight or fight brain
-
wave patterns. I’d enlarge the time by
an additional 10 minutes as the body becomes more habituated to sitting
longer. The body is a vehicle of “activity” and “motion” and when it is
inte
ntionally

sat still,


it will
rebel and
have the same reaction
s

as a two
year old that is asked to sit still for 10 minutes

in a chair

without
moving…good luck with that
!!



Therefore, taking the time every day to retrain the body to sit still
does take p
recious
personal
time, commitment, and consistency. And,
7


that’s where the unconditional love comes
from
. It’s our opportunity to
“fall
-
in
-
love” with ourselves ‘authentically’
in love with the eternal part of
ourselves that survives the death of the physi
cal body…
instead of
searching outside
environment
for a person, place, or thing to attach our
love to.



How much time for QContemplation
? Now that we understand
that QMeditation and QContemplation are two
separate
and distinct
practice
s, how do we divi
de our time?

Take a few minutes before each
day’s contemplation session to review any writing you have done in
connection with the ‘steps’ you are about to practice

as I said, think of
these notes as your road map to the journey you are about to take.



You may also find it helpful to re
-
read portions of the text

to
remind you
rself

of what you’re about to do

before you go into
contemplation. While you’re learning the process, every session will
start with 10 to 20 minutes for ‘induction.’ As you add

s
teps,


your time
frame should lengthen by about 10 to 15 minutes per

step.


Over time,
you will move more rapidly though the

steps


with which
you are already
familiar. By the ti
me you learn how to do all the

steps


in the process,
your daily contempl
ation
time
(including induction) will generally take
40 to 50 minutes.



Again, I caution you about leaping to any conclusions about the

amount of

time needed to prune away your old ineffective program
s

and
upload and rehearse new program
s
. As an extens
ion
of your
unconditional love

commitment to yourself
,

self
-
care


and
the
transforming
of
your subconscious
mind and its’
operating system
s

is
one of the highest feats of unconditional love

that you can give to
yourself
…why…because no one else on
Earth
can do this
work
for you
as lovingly and consistently as you
can
do

it
.



If you need to finish
meditation or contemplation
by a certain
time, set a timer to go off ten minutes before you must end your session.
That will give you a “heads
-
up” to complet
e the session, rather than
having to stop abruptly without bringing what you were doing to a close.



And set aside enough time to meditate
and do your contemplation
so that the clock doesn’t become a concern. After all, if you are
meditating and find y
ourself thinking about your watch, you
really
haven’t overcome time. Essentially, you may have to wake up earlier or
go to bed later in order to carve out this sacred time
for yourself.


8




Preparing your state of mind is where the battle is won or lost.

I’ve
often said that the road to “Self
-
Mastery” passes through “The Art of
Change.”
Self
-
Mastery also means mastering the Ego; which
is essential
for any human being. To be honest, I do have those days where I battle
my ego tooth and nail, since it want
s

to be in control. A good way to
think about the Ego and
understand
it
is to remember what these letters
stand for: E.G.O. Edging God Out or Ego.



What that means is that you’ve probably heard me refer to human
beings as God
-
in
-
the
-
Body? Well, in reality, that’s who we
really
are
!

But, the
Human Triad:

the
Body
,
Mind
, and
Emotions

have their own
agenda. So, that part of us that is eternal is cons
tantly in battle with
those parts of
us
that are not eternal and just want
to live daily life for the
pleasures and the pains of human existence. That’s why most people are
miserable and unhappy. Most people are living way out of balance and
equilibrium
with their inherent eternal nature

which is spiritual.



Some mornings as I
begin the process, my analytical mind starts
thinking about work that is piling up on my desk, meetings that I have
to attend, training sessions that I have to deliver, and repo
rts that I have
to write, my kids and their complexities, this Meetup group and how to
get my points across, phone calls I have to make, Blogs that I need to
write, and random thoughts from nowhere that pop into my head. I’m
obsessing about everything pre
dictable in my external life.



Typically, my mind, like most people’s mind, is either anticipating
the future or remembering the past. When that occurs, I have to settle
down and realize that those are all “known associations” that have
nothing to do with creating something new in that

present moment.



Mastering the body will take some time. If your body bucks like
an unbridled stallion because it wants to “be” the mind

to get up and
do something
, think about
some place

it has to go in the future, or
remember a past emotional experie
nce with
some person

in your life
---
you must settle it down into the present moment and relax it. Every time
you do, you are reconditioning your body to a new mind, and in time, it
will acquiesce. It was conditioned by an unconscious mind, and it has to
be retrained by you

so love it, work with it, and be kind to it. It will
ultimately surrender to you as its master. Remember to be determined,
persistent, excited, joyful, flexible, and inspired. When you do so, you
are reaching for the hand of the divi
ne…