The TCPIP campus contains 24 buildings all ... - CampusCruiser

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Oct 26, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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Campus Wireless Network Design

1

Running Head: Campus Wireless Network Design






Implementing a Campus Wireless Network Design: Fictional TCPIP Campus

Jered McClure

Walden University

Campus Wireless Network Design

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Problem


Technical College Park for International Politics (TCPIP) has decided to offer wireless
connec
tivity service to all its students, faculty, and staff while they are on the campus. However,
the general public should not have access to TCPIP's networks.

The

TCPIP campus

contains 24
buildings, all located in one contiguous area.

You have been asked to
design the TCPIP campus
network. You can use the TCPIP campus diagram in your network design.

Indicate on the
campus diagram the wired and wireless sections of the network. Add the hardware that will be
necessary for both the wired and wireless sections of

the network


(Walden University, 2011)
.

Campus Wireless Network Design

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Implementing a Campus Wireless Network Design: Fictional TCPIP Campus

In order to make a general assessment on the type of hardware required

for the TCPIP
campus
, I needed to make some assumptions as to the size of

the
university grounds
. Based on
the size of the dormitories,
assuming
each

room in the dormitory
is

15 by 15 feet and there being
10 rooms per floor with an added 5 feet each side of the dorm for stairs, etc.

I would put the
entire width and length of th
e campus at 1150

ft
.

each for a total of 1,322,500 ft
.^
2.

Basing the wireless network on Cisco’s Outdoor Wireless Mesh AP products, which have
a 1000
ft.

radius
, giving a 3,141,593 ft
.
^2 coverage area, would mean that the entire campus
could be covered by

one
Access Point (
AP
)

(Doherty, Anderson, Maggiora, & Clement, 2008)
.
However, the number of students on campus connecting to the APs at any given time ma
y
overload the M
esh. A
s such, I would recommend covering the campus with three
APs
, each

of
them

broa
dcasting
at
near
half

power.

Also,
the IT department, Student Center, A
dministration
Offices, and Library
would have wired Ethernet, for convenience purposes.

In regards to security,
“Cisco Wireless APs allow multiple Service Set IDs (SSID) to be
configure
d in each AP, providing what appears to be separate connection points for employees
and guests”

(Doherty, Anderson, Maggiora, & Clement, 2008, P. 344). As such, faculty would
have
access to one area of the wireless spectrum via a secure network login and s
tudents would
have

access to the internet
,

and/or the student network
,

via a student login.

This effectively splits
up the network into two subsections
, and only those clients with the appropriate login details
would be able to gain access to the Mesh.

In
order to ensure that all connections are secure, and that there
is no rogue access

po
ints
connected to the network, Cisco Clean Access (CCA) and Cisco Secure Agent (CSA) would be
implemented

(Doherty, Anderson, Maggiora, & Clement, 2008, P. 326)
.

CCA would

scan the
Campus Wireless Network Design

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client’s computer to ensure that it meets network connection standards as set out by the IT
department. CSA would scan the network to ensure that there are no rogues, and if so, block their
access to the Mesh.
Also, all connections would be via W
i
-
Fi Protected Access 2 (WPA2)
,

which
i
s a secure encryption standard.

This overall setup would ensure a near 100% coverage, with the most active networking
areas receiving land based Ethernet as well. All connections to and from the network would be
encry
pted and checked for health. Also, any rogue APs would be denied access to the network,
as well as, any unauthorized client access.
Finally, with only three APs to manage, the overall
setup would be cheaper and easier to manage than trying to setup a ninet
een (based on 150 ft.
radius coverage) AP Wi
-
Fi network using off the shelf wireless routers/switches.

Campus Wireless Network Design

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Reference

Doherty, J., Anderson, N., Maggiora, P. D., & Clement, N. (2008).
Cisco Networking Simplified

(2nd ed.). Indianapolis: Cisco Press.

Walden Uni
versity. (2011, December 5).
ITEC
-
1020
-
1 Networking Fundamentals
-

Unit 5:
Network Design Part II
-

Application.

Retrieved January 6, 2012, from Walden
University:
http://sylvan.live.ecollege.com/ec/crs/default.learn?CourseID=6256713&Survey=1&47=
7266367&ClientNodeID=984646&coursenav=1&bhcp=1


Campus Wireless Network Design

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Appendix

The map of the TCPIP campus is shown below
.



Administrative Offices


IT

2400

ft^2

Library

Student Center


900
ft^

707 ft^2

15ft

Rack Switch

Cisco Wireless

Mesh

Access Point

(MAP)

Primary
Mainframe:

DC, Gateway,
and Servers


575 F
t radius

Root Access
Point (RAP)